The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How many of you keep your hunting dog in the house? What are your reasons to keep him in the house or not? I have been keeping my puppy in the house for now until I can get a nice kennel for him outside. Let's hear your thoughts. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,998 Posts
Mines in the house because I like having a dog as a full time companion rather than just when we hunt together. There's a lot more to do with a hunting dog than just hunt. He's my hunting buddy and there are nights that just him and I sit on the couch watching TV and I talk to him like I would any other hunting buddy about past hunts we've been on. I get a lot more out of it than the dogs we have in the kennel. It doesn't affect his desire to hunt in the least either
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Ours are inside as well.
I agree with the above post, I talk to em like I would a human hunting buddy. We hang out, have a bond, and seem to understand each other better. I know when he senses something in the field just by his body language and behavior.
Hasn't effected hunts at all.
One is on a lawn chair cushion next to my side of the bed, the other is on a cushion in front of heater vent at base of bed.
They have a bench in livingroom they lay on (not allowed on furniture).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Our dog is the family pet as well and she's very loyal, well behaved and a great companion for my kids. The only problem is that during hunting season, every time I stand up she trips over my heels hoping that I pick up the gun and the orange vest! Lol!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Mine is in the house. To get a dog and kennel it to me didn't make any sense. As a grouse dog she can hunt less than 4 months a year. So for the other 8 months she just waits in a cage? Mine is a gsp and they have been breed to be companion dogs. She is great in the house, never gone to the bathroom or damaged anything beyond her toys. She doesn't even try n kill the cat. I feel like she listens and respects me more because of the time she spends in the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
I have a female setter her now and she has been with us for about 6 weeks now. She came from a kennel and had been attatched to a barrel for at least a year. Got her here and my wife had her house trained in about a week and a half. She had some problems and that is why she is here but she has come out of her shell and blends in now very nicely with the other dogs. Sleeps by the bed at night and is slowly getting over her man made problems. I don't think you can overestimate the importance of the bonding that happens with a dog that lives with you. My pups have no idea what it means to be outside unless it is with me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
bprush said:
To get a dog and kennel it to me didn't make any sense. As a grouse dog she can hunt less than 4 months a year. So for the other 8 months she just waits in a cage?
Exactly. If you only bother to run your dog(s) when you can shoot stuff, no sense holing them up in a kennel if they can satisfy a emotional need for you by keeping them inside, otherwise find a buddy with dogs. If they're worked a few times a week all year long, the fact they're outside doesn't seem to have any negative bearing on their state of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I was going to keep my Britt outside, but I keep her in a crate in the basement. I would love to have the dog upstairs with me but I would have to bathe her every day. I walk her in the woods every morning and night. That is 2 hours of exercise every day. (Good for me as well as her.) When she comes back, she is muddy, wet, stinky, and has ticks. I comb the ticks off, but I miss some. She has Frontline on so she is somewhat protected. I am not.

I figure it this way. I never tell the dog not to get in the mud or roll in the grass. When she is out, she can do whatever she wants. (Except for rolling in poop.) I figure she would rather have it that way than to get a bath every time she gets back home and is dirty.

I work at home so I let her out a few times a day and I spend time in the basement working on things at night, so I am with her throughout the day. She seems to be happy.

I don't think it matters if you keep them in the house or not. You must give them exercise and attention to get the most of the dog. For his sake and yours. I bond with my dog with the daily walks. I think that is more important than having her sleep beside me on the couch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Dogs are "Man's Best Friend" and should always be treated as such .The more People I meet The More I Love My Dog , if that's even possible . Please don't get a dog to put in a cage
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
I'll chime in. I have 3 beagles, my 2 males are kenneled outside in a 30 foot by 20 foot chainlink kennel. My female is my house dog. All 3 hunt rabbits just the same. I run them ALL YEAR long at least a few times a week minimum. Only if its out for an hour or two hours, we still get out. In the summer, its running at night when it isn't hot.

My female still hunts hard even though she is a house dog. The only difference I see is if we go outside and she isn't running around hunting, she shivers more than the males. The males will stand outside when its 0 degrees and look at you like its the middle of summer. I built them a box with 1 inch foam insulation all the way around and fill with straw. Have a heated water bowl to keep water fresh. All good.

All 3 listen and handle well. Inside or out i don't believe has any affect on how well they listen, you still gotta put the time in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Dogs are in the house. Willow, the setter, was added to the pack and she fit right in.

She has that Dr. Heckle & Mrs. Hyde personality. An unstoppable, flat out cover buster in the field, but then will lie down with a bone at my feet in the house and enjoy a nice belly rub.



They’re even helpful in the kitchen.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for sharing guys. I was hoping some would have their hunting companions in the house with them. Like I said my pup is in the house with me now. I'm growing so attached to him that I would like for him to live in the house with me. I just wanted to see if it was going to kill his desire to hunt or spoil him. Like most of you said he won't just be my hunting dog, he'll be my best friend. This is a huge relief. I look forward to sharing the same stories with my pup that you all share with you best friends. Thanks!
Smoke- that's good to hear because as you know my new pup is a beagle and wanted to make sure I'm going about everything the right way.

LDD- I hope my pup does the same every time I get up.

Thanks again guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,940 Posts
I think a hunting dog will hunt better for you if they're with you all the time. When they are with you constantly, that bond is so much stronger. My brit is always in the house, goes everywhere with us and sleeps in my son's bed with him every night. Dogs are pack animals and hunting is usually a pack activity. I just think they'll work harder for you if they are an established and consistant part of your pack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Buckethead said:
I think a hunting dog will hunt better for you if they're with you all the time. When they are with you constantly, that bond is so much stronger. My brit is always in the house, goes everywhere with us and sleeps in my son's bed with him every night. Dogs are pack animals and hunting is usually a pack activity. I just think they'll work harder for you if they are an established and consistant part of your pack.
Just IMO, judging from my situation, this is based solely on the dog alone and blood behind it. Not to disagree but I don't think keeping a dog inside makes it hunt harder for you. The hardest hunting dog I have is one of my outside males. So far, either one of my other 2 have yet to out hunt him. My female hunts good don't get me wrong, but not like him. Again, just a matter of opinion but I think it's more on a dog by dog basis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
i have five beagles and two beagle pups in the house. We live a a pack and we hunt as a pack. You'l find that they will listen better and be more in tune with you. crate training is very good for them. It will help with house breaking and it becoms there safe place/den.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
My wife and I keep our Weimaraner inside with us. He eats with us, sleeps with us, and just wants to be with us all the time. My wife's even pregnant with twins and she wants to be with him all the time. We even have a dog walker come in the middle of the day to get him some extra exercise when we're at work. So I guess I would have to agree that if you get a dog to just hunt him a few months out of the year and then pen him up, it isn't necessarily fair to the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
My three German Shorthairs are in the house all the time. I keep them in a crate wehn no one is home but the rest of the time they are our with the family. They eat with us sleep with us etc like the others have said. My wife runs them in agility to keep them in shape for the offseason. they hunt from October to Jan/feb if i can get out of state with them so they need something to fill up the other eight months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
I keep our 3 (2 labs and a GSP) in the house and they sleep in our bed at night. The wife spoils them when they are not hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
I have a GSP and a setter and they both live in the house. The GSP has the run of the house 24/7 but the setter sleeps in a crate. If I don't put her in there at night and leave the crate door open, she'll go in herself.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top