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Had a call from a friend of mine asking me to take him to pick up his truck. Met him at his brother's house and took him to his truck parked at the State game lands. Asked him why his truck is here. He told me that he was hunting with his friends and one of them accidentally shot himself. He heard a shot and went over and found his friend lying there. He has putting his 44 mag. revolver in the shoulder holster when it discharged. Bullet crossed the body and came out the top of the opposite shoulder. Missed heart by an inch but completely destroyed the shoulder bones and part or the arm bone. According to his friend sometimes the hammer didn't stay back on the revolver. They surmise he holsterd the weapon and it discharged. He has a plate from elbow to neck and is facing multiple surgeries. Long recovery and rehab too.
 

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if I read that correctly, it would appear from your wording the the man was holstering the gun with the hammer "Back"?? Means it was cocked?
 

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He is lucky to still be alive, hopefully his surgeries and recovery go well. Accidents happen, scary stuff. I’ll be praying for him.
 

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Feel bad for the victim and hope he recovers, but I just don't know what to say about carrying and holstering a cocked revolver. What was he thinking?
 

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The man is very lucky he survived. Trigger shoes are common cause of this type of accident. I’d be interested to know what type of shoulder holster and pistol was involved. I could only see this happening from a muzzle up holster, which seems very unlikely for a hunting pistol.
 

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I don’t know the man so I can’t say as to what he was thinking. I do know there is guys out there that really want to hunt, but had no one to teach them either hunting or the safe handling of firearms. I will use an example from this very season. We had a young man(mid twenties) at camp this year who is exactly I described above. He always wanted to hunt and was interested in shooting, he just had no one to teach him. The second day of rifle I Noticed he was walking around with safety off on his ‘06. I went off on him, probably a bit harsher than need be but I don’t play around with gun safety. But he was doing it because no one taught him not to, and he thought it would be better in case he saw a deer he wouldn’t have to worry about switching it off.
 

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Prayers for him and his family. Sound like a long recovery.
 

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The man is very lucky he survived. Trigger shoes are common cause of this type of accident. I’d be interested to know what type of shoulder holster and pistol was involved. I could only see this happening from a muzzle up holster, which seems very unlikely for a hunting pistol.
Some of the cross chest holsters for large revolvers have the opening high on the chest, I can see how the wound can be where the OP described if he had his finger in the trigger while he was attempting to holster his gun.
 
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I don’t know the man so I can’t say as to what he was thinking. I do know there is guys out there that really want to hunt, but had no one to teach them either hunting or the safe handling of firearms. I will use an example from this very season. We had a young man(mid twenties) at camp this year who is exactly I described above. He always wanted to hunt and was interested in shooting, he just had no one to teach him. The second day of rifle I Noticed he was walking around with safety off on his ‘06. I went off on him, probably a bit harsher than need be but I don’t play around with gun safety. But he was doing it because no one taught him not to, and he thought it would be better in case he saw a deer he wouldn’t have to worry about switching it off.
It's great that you're helping this new hunter. If this twenty-something took the required hunter safety course, he was taught. He just didn't listen. Hopefully he's listening & learning from you.
Years ago I hunted with a man who was a trained combat veteran and college graduate. For some inexplicable reason he would load his rifle and check to see if the safety was on by pointing at the ground and pulling the trigger. When his '06 went off the first time we had strong words. When it happened a second time, we never hunted together again. Regardless of age, background, or IQ, some guys should never have a gun in their hands.

Prayers sent for the gentleman who shot himself with the handgun. Sounds like he's in for a long recovery.
 

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Some of the cross chest holsters for large revolvers have the opening high on the chest, I can see how the wound can be where the OP described if he had his finger in the trigger while he was attempting to holster his gun.
Yes indeed! A good possibility.
 

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According to his friend sometimes the hammer didn't stay back on the revolver. They surmise he holsterd the weapon and it discharged.

I feel sorry for the guy but isn't this firearms safety 101. "Sometimes the hammer didn't stay back" YES, it's called pulling the trigger and firing the weapon. Why would anyone be putting a cocked revolver back into a shoulder holster? And, if there was an issue with the pistol it should have been at the gunsmith and not in the field. Some people should not be around firearms.
 
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