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From experience, never trust a realtor as the final word on this type of thing. They sell property. They're salespeople, they rarely know the building and zoning codes of individual townships. And more of them know less and less about it now then they did years ago. You'd be foolish to trust them to thoroughly research it for you. Some of them may indeed know but you better do your own due diligence to be sure. It's called buyer beware, not realtor beware for a reason.

This is your responsibility as the potentially buyer so you contact the local township zoning and building codes offices AND you also consult an experienced land attorney. Not all townships, especially in rural areas, have their zoning regs and construction codes online so yes, you do have to often speak with them and go to the office too and review the books in person.
 

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Notice in my previous post, I said "a competent RE" person? As in one that has to know what's up, in order to represent the seller. In many rural counties they have county wide septic codes and townships don't have their own enforcement officers, like more populated areas do. The Twp. my camp is in, uses a guy that covers zoning and building codes in multiple townships in both Potter and Tioga, for example.

Back in the 80s, one of ou Twp. supervisors told dad and I, that they were being told by the state to pass an ordinance for privies. IIRC the details, no new ones could be permitted, not even for seasonal camps. Since we still had our privy, he suggested we fill in the hole with dirt and not use it, since we'd gone to indoor plumbing. Ours never had a hole under it. Military style: access door, third of a steel drum. Burned 'er off with diesel fuel couple times a year.

They were informed that DEP personnel would be making regular inspections of malfunctioning on site septic systems, to watch for sewage running on the ground, etc. They were not amused having the state tell them what to do locally, but had no choice. Since then they've had to enact quite a few new ordinances to keep the state happy.

Oddest thing I've ever seen: Farmer was putting in a double wide for one son that was getting married. Original spot was in Tioga. County sewage officer told them it'd have to be a sand mound. So they called the Potter guy, since the long flat spot spanned both counties. Perked it, said a conventional leach bed system was ok. So they moved the two halves of the house about a hundred yards and put it in Potter.
 

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In order to represent the seller, a competent RE agent has to know how to sell property. And if I'm a potential buyer I'll have an agent who's representing ME! And still at the end of the day, the agents are salespeople who's goal is to close a sale and earn a commission. I'm not saying don't use a RE agent or don't consider their advice and knowledge.. I'm saying don't rely on them as the final word on what you can and can't do building-wise on a specific property. Again it's called buyer beware for a reason.
 

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From experience, never trust a realtor as the final word on this type of thing. They sell property. They're salespeople, they rarely know the building and zoning codes of individual townships. And more of them know less and less about it now then they did years ago. You'd be foolish to trust them to thoroughly research it for you. Some of them may indeed know but you better do your own due diligence to be sure. It's called buyer beware, not realtor beware for a reason.

This is your responsibility as the potentially buyer so you contact the local township zoning and building codes offices AND you also consult an experienced land attorney. Not all townships, especially in rural areas, have their zoning regs and construction codes online so yes, you do have to often speak with them and go to the office too and review the books in person.
After we purchased our land, the realtor said "you do know you can't build a cabin here, right". Ha ha ha. Nobody mentioned it to us beforehand. Turns out the the guy that owned and developed the lots also did the same thing in a another cabin community in a different township close by. The guy that owned these lots told the other township he would put in sewer and he didn't. They thought they could stop all building on this guys lots everywhere. My buddy and fellow owner is a Township building inspector, zoning officer, etc. He called the solicitor for our cabin township and told him he couldn't restrict us because of what the builder did in another township. Solicitor didn't know anything about our situation but he said "you're right". We built our cabin. Realtor was surprised, oops!!
 

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One thing to see about getting accomplished pre-purchase. Determine where You want the structure, and have the land perked.

If it perks too slow or fast, then remediation would create unwanted, sometimes high expenses.
 
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