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First thing I would try is clean it good.
 

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TC?

You can replace it, reharden it, half sole it.

If it is a case hardened frizzen and you are through the carbon layer, you can add carbon, by treating it with something like Kasenit, add a thin veneer of high carbon steel (half soling) or replace it.

What kind of gun is it?
 

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Just replace it, its cheap and easy. If you don't know how take it to a gunsmith, he will hand it back to you in about 2 minutes if he's not busy.
 

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Gotcha ! Half-soling will probably make it last forever. Most I have seen were high temp epoxied, but I suppose you could solder or weld it if you knew how. I like the fact that you want to fix the old one, good thinking!
 

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half soling isn't hard. you need a piece of very thin clock spring, or spring steel stock. 1/32 or less in thickness. (thinner the better) Using as little heat as possible cut the spring stock so it is just slightly larger than the frizzen face. Roughen the frizzen face and roughen the outside curve of the spring piece. A rubbing with a rough grind stone does a good job. Clean both pieces, epoxy the roughend surfaces and clamp together tight with a C-clamp for 24 hours. Then again, with out heat slowly grind the edgr of the spring stock back to meet the frizzen edges. I have done a few tc frizzens that way. My brother still uses one after 25 years.
 

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Yep, pull starter, old wind up clock, etc. Old clickers. Normally it has a bluish color. it should be as wide as the frizzen face. a little narrower won't hurt, it just won't look as good. Dixie Gun Works sells thin spring stock.

Most recoil starters have spring steel that is too thick and too narrow, but that is the idea. At one time all 5 and 10's sold wind up clocks that had nice wide thin spring steel. (If you even remember a 5 and 10) Keep an eye out at yard sales and flea markets.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok any special expoy or just normal stuff I may try to do this once the new one comes in...there a 5 and 10 in northern cambria
 

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The reconditioning sounds like more work than what it's worth. I had the same issue with mine last year. I replaced it. I was apprehensive about it at first, thinking I had to have the right tools, and knock out little pins, etc... but it was no problem. Turns out there was just one small machine screw holding the frizzen on. The key to it all is having a pair of small neddlenose lock pliers (channel lock) to hold the pressure off the spring when backing the screw out and popping the new frizzen on.

Oh, and the other small issue was that it didn't close quite right on the pan. I had to do some light grinding work on it to get it to close better. Hopefully you won't have that issue. The new frizzen was only about $18-$20 I believe. I'd just go the replacement route if it were me.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
i am replacing i have a new one on the way but isnt fixing and adjusting and trying to make parts for you gun that much better when you shoot something with it you have a more sence of acomplishment bc you did it or you made it
 

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There is something to be said for just replacing. It is cheap. But you are also correct about fixing a part to perform better. It sure isn't the traditional way to fix a frizzen, but you are right about the satisfaction that comes from self accomplishment. A little more independence. A little more self confidence. Ever so slightly closer to the self reliant spirit of the early frontiersmen. A twelve inch piece of spring steel stock 1/32 and one inch wide at Dixie is $4 plus shipping. I just use cheap epoxy from the hardware store. $7.00 and the knowledge that I can fix it myself, vs a new frizzen at $20.

Also, for frizzen springs, etc. There is one tool that has come in so handy over the years and I use it for lots of things. A needle nose vise grip pliers. about 7 inches long. You can adjust it for how far it closes so you don't over compress a spring like a main spring or frizzen spring. Just use two pieces of tablet backer cardboard to keep from marring the spring. You can adjust it so you only compress the spring enough to do the work. Cost around $12.00. It also works on small coil springs and those tight spots you can't get a regular pliers into.
 

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There is one tool that has come in so handy over the years and I use it for lots of things. A needle nose vise grip pliers. about 7 inches long. You can adjust it for how far it closes so you don't over compress a spring like a main spring or frizzen spring.
hmmmm, that sounds familiar.


No doubt, if you're looking for an "I did it myself using these crude, obscure parts I conjured up", then have at it. Don't forget, to apply heat, you have to do it over an open fire, no blow torches in 1750.
 
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