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I'm a fairly patient person. However not patient enough to sit and pick crabs long enough to satisfy my appetite for the delicious critters. I don't think I've ever left a table of crabs saying "I'm full, no more". More like "I'm tired of picking crabs". Or maybe "I wish I had enough money to buy some more crabs"! 馃構
 

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I'm a fairly patient person. However not patient enough to sit and pick crabs long enough to satisfy my appetite for the delicious critters. I don't think I've ever left a table of crabs saying "I'm full, no more". More like "I'm tired of picking crabs". Or maybe "I wish I had enough money to buy some more crabs"! 馃構
I must be abnormal as I never walked away from a crab eating session hungry!! Of course....it ain't a half hour session by any means!!:)
 

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I'm a fairly patient person. However not patient enough to sit and pick crabs long enough to satisfy my appetite for the delicious critters. I don't think I've ever left a table of crabs saying "I'm full, no more". More like "I'm tired of picking crabs". Or maybe "I wish I had enough money to buy some more crabs"! 馃構

I hear ya. This is my idea of picking crabs:

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I must be abnormal as I never walked away from a crab eating session hungry!! Of course....it ain't a half hour session by any means!!:)
I've set at the table for a couple of hours, and still could eat more. Shrimp, clams, crab.....any seafood. Seems like I could just eat it for hours on end!!!

And of course lobster, but that would get ridiculously expensive.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I hear ya. This is my idea of picking crabs:

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When I lived near Trenton NJ I belonged to a club that would meet once a month for a combined dinner and meeting at an area restaurant. We'd book the conference room for the evening and the restaurant would assign a couple of waitresses to take care of us. One of the places we met was at the Chesapeake Bay Seafood House across the river in Levittown/Fairless Hills. They had a deal where you would pick and pay for an item on the menu and for the rest of your stay you could do as many more picks as you liked for the same price or less at no additional cost. That was in the late 1980s and at that time the Alaska King Crab was priced at $11.99. My second pick was a freebie so I'd order the crab again. "But wait, there's more!" Everything else on the menu is priced cheaper than King crab, so I could order anything I wanted all night for free. Those were some great nights out.
 

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Nothing beats a summer afternoon sitting around a picnic table at the shore house with good friends or family, some ice-cold beers, and a bushel or two of fresh steamed crabs and corn on the cob.
Can sit, pick, drink, eat and laugh the hours away.
Yep, this would be my ideal way of having beer,,,, or Crab lol I meant crab first. :ROFLMAO:
 

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King crab does taste decent when drenched with salted butter & does serve to fill the gut quicker but a properly seasoned/steamed hardshell is like filet mignon compared to minute steak!! :)
You got that backward Loggy!!! King crab industry didn't need to develop it's own seasoning (Old Bay) to make its product appeal to the masses.:LOL:

Ohhh, those sweet,sweet King crab.......

*Both species really are delicious. You can thro snow crabs (actually my favorite) in there too, they're all good!:)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When it comes to crustaceans we have plenty of varieties to choose from and each has it's own unique flavor and it's own fans. My favorite is the Northern Lobster, but I also like the Blue Claw Crabs from the mid Atlantic region, the Stone Crab claws from Florida, the less well know Rock Shrimp from Florida, the Gulf Shrimp, Rock Crabs from California, Dungeness Crabs from the Pacific Northwest, and a few of the different King Crabs from Alaska, and I think they're all good in their own way.

Side note
We don't see Rock Shrimp from Florida because most people don't know what they are. That's because they werent made commercially available until a machine was invented that could split and devein them. They're a medium size shrimp with a hard shell like a lobster and they actually taste very much like a lobster. If you ever get the opportunity, do try them.
 

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Rock shrimp were (are) awesome 馃槬
Unfortunately, I'm allergic now to all shrimp.
Loved 'em while I could though.
At least God let me continue enjoying crabs, lobster, clams, oysters, and mussels... but man I miss shrimp.
 

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Mussels are the only thing from the ocean I don't like. I'd even go as far to say it's a food I hate. One of the few, as I'm not a picky eater.
 

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Mussels are the only thing from the ocean I don't like. I'd even go as far to say it's a food I hate. One of the few, as I'm not a picky eater.

I got terrible food poisoning eating mussels, and to make matters worse we were tent camping on the sand at Assateague. Hit me during the night and was one of the worst nights and following day of my life. That was the last time I ate mussels.
 

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I got terrible food poisoning eating mussels, and to make matters worse we were tent camping on the sand at Assateague. Hit me during the night and was one of the worst nights and following day of my life. That was the last time I ate mussels.
That would just not be any fun馃槬

Especially tent camping.......馃樀
 

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Well you guys can talk how wonderful those king crabs, stone crabs etc are but I eat several hundred blue hard shells in an average season and to me they are heads & tails above ALL and yes I tried them all!! To each their own.....main thing you're eating/enjoying crabs!!. I catch all my crabs:

Daughter made me this sign(she knows im a crabbing nut lol)

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Discussion Starter #19
Back in the 1950s some bright fellow that owned a good sized piece of ground that went from Route 9 in Waretown, NJ out to the bay decided to make his fortune by selling lots. It was called Barnegat Beach and Barnegat Beach Drive was a gravel road that went straight through the woods out to the salt march. A dragline was hired to make a lagoon and what the dragline pulled up was used for fill on either side of the lagoon. They never knocked down the forest like was done in most developments, but instead they sold wooded lots that the new owner could clear himself or hire somebody to clear. My father bought three lots and cleared them himself, first by hacking out the small stuff with a grub axe and burning it and later he took out enough trees in the middle of the property to start building a house. Fill had to be brought in because even though the lots were a half mile from the bay that area was still on the books as being one foot below sea level and could flood during a hurricane.
Dad had a bay boat called a garvey but eventually traded up to a forty foot wood hulled boat with a Chrysler-Gray marine engine that was one of the first boats to have a slip in the lagoon and that was where we slept while he was building the house.
What a wonderful adventure it was for a kid! I was old enough to be on my own and made friends with another kid. Some days we'd pick blueberries in the woods and then set up a card table right on Rt. 9 and sell berries, and on other days we'd catch crabs.
We didn't have crab traps, but we had a long handled crab net and we'd just keep checking the dock pilings until we saw a crab hanging on a piling doing whatever it is that crabs do. We'd slip the net into the water a few feet from the crab and then move it slowly until it was just under the crab. Then we'd yank that net up as quick as we could and the water pressure would hold the crab in the net until it was out of the water and we could flip him into a peach basket. If we missed the basket we had to slam the net down on him before he could drop back into the lagoon. To do that we first had to learn the many ways not to pick up an angry Blue Claw. Little ones pinch, but big ones can draw blood and sometimes they don't let go until they figure you learned your lesson.
Another method we use was to tie the head of a mossbunker onto a long piece of string and toss it in. When it went to the bottom you couldn't see it but if you kept just a little tension on the string you could feel the crab pulling and tugging on it. Old Mister Crab is greedy and if you pull slowly you could bring him up to just below the surface and slip the net under him.
We would pile some seaweed in with the crabs and once in a while we'd walk 'em down the launch ramp to give them a bath, and by late afternoon we were on our way to Jay's house so his mom could cook them, and both families would get together for a pig out.
We were just a couple of kids, but we were heroes. We provided for our families just like our fathers did. Oh man, what a feeling that was!
 
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