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I admit I attempted to get into the traditional sport bought a Martin think only spent like 250 on a bow. I do love the look of those black widow but as for now I don’t shoot or hunt enough with bow to justify dropping big money on that bow.

Be safe shoot straight .
 

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Not sure if this was a question or just a statement. i shot my first trad deer this year with a samick sage that cost me about 140 for the bow and the string upgrade.

I did buy a custom made reflex deflex that cost me $550. I love the new bow and shoots smoother and better than the sage but dead is dead and shot placement is the big thing. I just wanted a high quality bow custom made to my liking that i will have forever. So if I have that bow for 30 years. It will cost me about 18 dollars a year. I can live with that.
 

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I have a Black Widow MAII Graybark I bought back in the early 1980's. It's a nice bow. Last year I sent it back to BW to have it refinished and poundage reduced, they got it down from 53# @ 28 to 49# @ 28.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That greay bark with antler knobs to help break down bow is truly a masterpiece.

When ever I decided to make the deep plunge once and for all the black widow is on my wish list.
 

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My first stickbow harvest was around "86". Shot that buck with a Martin. That bow sold new for $112. Even while I had my shop, I shot Bears, Martins and older Bob Lee bows.

Hi end pretty bows are just that. There are a great many quality bows out the that can be had for reasonable $$. The last buck I shot was with a Bear that I had $80 invested in. Killed a hog in SC with that same bow. Currently shooting Black Hunter that cost < $200 new.

Be patient, shoots lots of different bows, and you'll know when a good one comes along.
 

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... Hi end pretty bows are just that. There are a great many quality bows out the that can be had for reasonable $$. The last buck I shot was with a Bear that I had $80 invested in. Killed a hog in SC with that same bow. Currently shooting Black Hunter that cost < $200 new...
I totally get that. In fact the bow I shoot the best out of my collection is an old Pearson that was an inexpensive bow in it's day and I happened to get for free from a neighbor. Darn thing just plain shoots where I look, period.

That said, if you have the scratch, nothing wrong with desiring a high end, foam core, exotic wood and carbon lam thunder stick. Heck, a Kia will get me down the road, but if I could afford it, there'd be a Dodge Hellcat in my driveway. :grin2:
 

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First Widow new in '87 was 475 w quiver and case.
Had another built in '01 for 860 IIRC.
Last new one was in '04. Still under a K for bare bow.

I love em.

But with injuries, just don't shoot as much.
I'd like a new PCH, but one oops and it could be a wallhanger.

Lucky for me I really really really (did I say "really"?) like the old metal riser Blackwidow HS.
Have had three of them.
Two older non FF models.
Finally found a FF radius riser last version, for 400 bucks.
And I had to refinish the riser.

Came out like new.
Kept my old quiver from the first one, a Delta.

Am a happy camper.

Aint got a single problem with shooting a used bow.
If a PCH came alone at the specs I like, I'd buy one.

But I don't need another bow.
Am satisfied with the one I got, only took 3 yrs to find one.

They don't make em anymore, which makes em cool, but also of risk- since can't get replacement limbs.
 
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I never bought a new custom bow but have got a couple great deals on the leather wall. I have a Dwyer longbow I got for 400 that was worth every penny. I’ve gone through several recurves from some high end companies, I couldn’t shoot any of them as well my first recurve, a Martin hunter. Unless you want a bow built to your exact specifications, I’d recommend keeping an eye out for good deals on used ones.
 

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The question-"How much would I spend on a traditonal bow?"
In truly asking this question I first must state I hunt with mutliple styles-recurve, compound, and even a crossbow.
I would say this about spending money on a new, or used recurve bow:
-How much will I use it?
-How much time am I willing to dedicate in being proficient with it to actually be able to hunt with it?
-Just how serious over all am I about truly diving into the traditional world of bowhunting with the bow itself?
In the end the sky is the limit with forming an answer to the question.
Now--If I were not really sure about being super serious about dedicating time, and effort, and being truly proficient with the bow so as to be honestly, and ethically ready to take game using it I would not dive head first in spending a large amount of money.
Only after truly being dedicated, and becoming truly comfortable with the traditional style of hunting would I consider spending a larger amount of money on perhaps a custom made bow.
In other words---perhaps you have little to no experience with traditional shooting, and start into it. I've seen folks get very discouraged, and then decide it's not for them. Tradtional archery requires time, and dedication to become, and remain proficient. Only after spending the time to really tell myself--"I'm all in--I love the tradtional bow, and am willing to dedicate the time, and effort to do this--I truly love it." Then I would consider going deeper into the waters as they say.
There is no reason to go out, and spend a very large sum of money on a custom, or semi-custom bow that after a short time of shooting it you tell yourself---I just don't think this style of bowhunting, or archery is for me.
I know many people who love looking at the beauty of a traditional bow, but flat out tell me that there is no way they are willing to dedicate the time to it, and also the fact that using this style of equipment reduces your range in the woods, and requires one to get up close, and personal with game to be successful.I have friends who tell me--there is no way I am willing to use equipment that "limits" their effective range to no more than 20 yards. Many have gotten used to the world of modern equipment such as the compound, and crossbow which allows them to extend their ranges on game compared to the traditonal bow, and when they step into this world of traditional equipment they quickly find it isn't for them.
I've told a friend this--before you even give thought to spending ANY money on traditonal bowhunting---ask yourself:
Are you willing to have less shot opportunities?
Are you willing to reduce the range you can shoot at live game?
Are you truly willing to let an animal walk that is just outside your maximum effective range?
Are you willing to truly devote, and dedicate time to practice to become, and remain proficient with traditional equipment?
If the answers to these questions are no--then you may want to reconsider making the move to tradtional archery.
To go back to the original question---my answer--start slow with a bow that fits, and you can truly learn to shoot well. As you progress you will be able to form an honest opinion of just how far you want to go into the world of traditonal archery, and bowhunting. You will eventaully know for yourself if this if for you, and whether your desire to do it is either there, or not there.
As they say--the bug will either bite you, and you'll get addicted to it, or you'll find the bug hasn't truly bit you, and you have no burning desire to go deeper into it.
I posted this long winded post because I have seen folks dump large amounts of money into a traditional bow only to find out that it isn't for them. They end up selling the bow, and gear at a loss, and only have regrets. There is no use in doing this. Start slow, and feel it out.
 

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Yes in traditional archery equipment won’t buy you accuracy. And there are a lot of people who spend lots of money on bows that don’t fit them and that are too heavy for them to shoot properly.
There are $400 bows that will shoot as well as $1500 bows in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing.
 

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Yes in traditional archery equipment won’t buy you accuracy. And there are a lot of people who spend lots of money on bows that don’t fit them and that are too heavy for them to shoot properly.
There are $400 bows that will shoot as well as $1500 bows in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing.
I agree 100%. I've seen folks over-bow themselves, and also attempt using bows that simply do not fit them to include a grip that isn't really suited for their comfort--all after spending a lot of money, and forcing themselves to keep trying with the bow itself.
For me--I love the aesthetics of a beautiful bow, but have no misconception that a beautiful bow will perform, or make me a better shooter as far as accuracy. It's all in what one wants from their bow. For me I love bows such as the Norm Johnson Blacktail bows--beautiful, and good performers. However--with what they cost would I expect that just because the bow is pretty, and cost a lot--will it make me a better shooter? The answer is no. Could I get similar results as far as a good shooting bow by spending less?--Answer is yes.
It comes down to what each person desires, and wants from the sport of traditional bowhunting, or shooting.
If you truly love the sport, and desire to spend the big money on a pretty bow--by all means yes if it's within your budget. If you are limited, and perhaps desire to get a much less expensive bow that you can also shoot well--again by all means do it.
Every person will define what their expectations are with their equipment. Most people I know who would drop the big money on a nice custom recurve are already very experienced in the sport, and simply desire to have a pretty bow just because they can, and they do not have any expectation that because it's super pretty it will be some kind of magic shooting bow. I also know folks who have not spent a lot of money on a bow, and are highly satisfied with their equipment, and how well they can shoot it.
The sky is the limit with tradtional archery. It's all in what one wants to spend, and what makes them happy.
My thoughts on much of this as far as cost, and such with bows today is simple--shoot what you like, and like what you shoot. Just make sure it all fits well as far as the bow itself. Shooting equipment that does not fit well will only instill poor form, and habits. I have found those habits are extremely hard to break. Forcing yourself to try and fit yourself to too much draw weight, or a bow that's too short--bad grip feel to the bow itself is no way to make the sport fun. The sport is supposed to fun, and when huge amounts of frustration set in thats simply not a good place to be. By taking baby steps, and keeping the cost down until one gets comfortable with their shooting, and such is what I would suggest.
I've been shooting a recurve off, and on since the early 1970's, and I guess my love of doing so s because it's what I began with. Didn't spend much at all to start--just kept working hard at getting better, and it's all fun.
There is absolutely no reason to break the bank in participating in traditional archery. Now--if the bug btes you, and you get addicted to shooting traditional--well then maybe you'll find yourself wanting to break the bank on a pretty bow--believe me when I say this.:grin2:
 

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I admit I attempted to get into the traditional sport bought a Martin think only spent like 250 on a bow. I do love the look of those black widow but as for now I don’t shoot or hunt enough with bow to justify dropping big money on that bow.

Be safe shoot straight .
I shot a Black Widow over 40 years a ago, could not afford one at the time at the age of 18 just out of high school.
So I settled for a Hoyt Pro Hunter which was no slouch.
I always said if I ever bought another recurve it would be a Black Widow.
If you can afford it go for it, regardless of how often you get to hunt with it.
How many $3-4000.00 Rifles sit in the safe to be hunted with once a year.:smile2:
 

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i still have one recurve that i bought back in 1981. i used that to take all kinds of Pennsylvania game, big and small. i dont hunt with it anymore, i have a bum shoulder and the riser cracked. it can not be repaired as the very tiny crack goes up the handle and right next to Fred Bears signature. its a custom Kodiak takedown. cost me $225.00 in 1981 and says


happy hunting (real name) Fred Bear 1981


i dont need another one of any kind :)
 
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