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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m not sure if this is the right place to post this so if it isn’t I apologize. I recently discovered that honey bees seem to have made a hive underneath the siding of the house. I contacted a few people who do bee removals but they won’t do it because they said they probably wouldn’t survive the move. I don’t want them there in fear they will eventually make it into the house and decided I’ll remove them myself. What are the easiest ways to remove them?
 

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If you were to cut them out now, their odds of surviving winter would be low. Bees will have all their winter preparations made, or will be finishing up soon. Honey stores, pollen caches, and even the tail end of hatching brood. Cutting out comb and attaching it to empty frames can be done, but it won’t be what the bees planned. And if anything happens to the queen, the colony is doomed. Sometimes when you do a cut out, it really messes with the hives heads, and they’ll take out their frustration on the queen ( kill her ). Again, it’s gonna be a dead hive.

As far as removing them, you might be surprised what you find when you pop the siding off. I’ve seen bees build comb two studs wide and eight feet high. Not always, but sometimes these colonies can be massive. You’ll need a good smoker to try to calm them, but you’re still gonna put thousands of bees in the air. A good veil, gloves, and thick enough clothes to stop stings.

Your going into fall now and bee numbers are going to drop fast. All the workers who have been working goldenrod are all used up, they’ll be dead soon. The winter cluster will be a fraction of what’s in there now, maybe 5000 bees as opposed to 30,000 bees. When winter comes they‘ll cluster up tight and it’ll be very unlikely they’ll find their way inside. I’d recommend you leave them there, and find someone familiar with cut outs and extractions to get them in late March, early April. Done right, they usually go smooth….but I’ve seen some turn into a real cluster.

I don’t know where you’re located, but in some areas bee guys will do it for nothing. I’ve never charged anyone, but I do pick and choose what I want to get into. ( no more 30 foot ladders ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help. A local guy stop by today and looked. They were actually yellow jackets. I miss ID them probably cause I wouldn’t get to close haha but he said they will die in the winter because they won’t make enough food. I hope that’s right
 

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Yes, they will die. Wasps and hornets do not survive winters as a colony. Only a few queens overwinter, usually burrowing into the ground.

Honey bees survive as a colony. There’s thousands of bees in a winter cluster, they vibrate their wings to create friction and heat, keeping the center of the cluster a balmy 94 degrees. Queen will start laying eggs for the new season in mid February.
 
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