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OK, I'm a complete new-be to X-Bow shooting. I picked up a Carbon Express Covert Tyrant Crossbow Package on a close-out deal from MidwayUSA last month. It came with a Carbon Express branded scope, although I have no idea who actually made the scope. I will probably replace the optics with something better after I figure out what I'm doing, but for now..............

The scope has two hash-marks above the cross hair and three below. Their manual is completely insufficient as it goes to explaining the proper sight in procedure, only stating something like: sight in using the top cross hair at 15-20 yards and then every hash is about 8-10 yards of distance difference.

So, asking from help from the experienced group here. How would you go about sighting in this scope? Should I really use the top hash at 20 or are the ones above the cross hair for shooting closer or from an elevation?!

So far, I have just dialed it in at 20 yards with the Cross hair, not the top hash.
 

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I would just use the crosshairs as 20 yds and the chevrons below for longer shots, adding 10yds for each one. I haven't seen a crossbow scope with marks above the cross hairs. If you decide on another scope I would get one that has a "speed ring" to better fine tune your shots beyond 20 yds. I also like lighted cross hairs which work well in low light, especially in a blind.
Overall you will like xbow hunting.
 

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Either try to find somewhere you can shoot inside at 50 yards, or wait till it warms up a bit (or just layer up) but here is what I would do. Look into your scope- what draws you eye attention- the chevrons above the cross hair or the cross hair? I'll bet it's the cross hairs. Secondly, where are you primarily hunting- woods or fields? If its woods, I would sight in the cross hairs to 20 yards. If it's in a field where you may have longer shots, then use the top chevron. Now here is where it will take time. You have to determine what each line below your 20 zero's in at. Your manual says 8-10 yard difference for each chevron, but think of it this way. If you think they are 10 yards apart, and you shoot at a deer at 40 yards, you could be as much as 6-8 inches low. You need to find out exactly where each one hits. On my Ten Point- if I'm on at 20, then my 30 is about 1/2'low and my 40 is 1"low, and my 50 is 1 3/4" low. None of these discrepancies will make a huge difference on a deer, but at least I know where it will hit. Biggest thing is 1) don't sight into circles- sight into a horizontal line across a blank piece of cardboard. You won't stack arrows that way, and you can shoot 6 arrows to compare where you are hitting. I use a piece of black electrical tape as my line. Now you can measure up or down from the tape to see how much you are high or low. 2) block up your crossbow like you would a rifle for consistent shots. 3) Turn your target for a vertical line and aim for it- now you can adjust windage.
 

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There was an article in the Oct issue of the Pennsylvania Game News about sighting in a scope on a crossbow. I imagine there are several ways to do this but here is my take based on the article.

Put the xbow on a solid rest and use the crosshairs to sight it in at 20 yds. Adjust the windage and elevation knobs to zero it in. Go to the next lower crosshair and shoot from 30 yds. If the arrow hits high, move back. If the arrow hits low, move up. Do not change the scope settings. Once you are hitting the bullseye, measure the distance, then go to the next crosshair and shoot from 40 yds. Again adjust your distance to hit bullseye. Keep doing this up to your longest range crosshair. When you are done, write the distance for each crosshair on tape and put it on the bow. The distances for the crosshairs may vary, i.e. 20, 32, 44, and 56 yds.

Some scopes have a speed dial. For them, you sight in at 20 yds then shoot at 50 yds using the appropriate crosshair. If the arrow is high, you turn up speed dial. If arrow is low, you turn speed dial down. Once you are set for 20 and 50 yds, it should be good for all ranges in between.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 

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I bought a Ten Point 'take off' from ebay. Dealer was upgrading basic models to speed dials. It has 3 cross hairs and 4th dot on the vertical cross hair. All 4 light up in red or green. Top cross hair set to 20 yards. Check the next at 30 and 40 and the low dot is 50. Those scopes are made by Hawke. It was $89.00 shipped.....
 

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Read the instructions in your owners manual. It will tell you how to sight in the scope. I had a carbon express scope on my cross bow, it worked fine, I replaced it with a different scope that was a little more clear but the instructions in the manual will tell you how to sight it in.
 

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Yeah, I don't think I would bother with the top hash line either, I'm guessing your Xbow shoots around 350 fps if the manual tells you to sight in at about 20 yards. As mentioned above check 30 & 40 yards, then practice a lot. Best thing about a Xbow other than hunting with one is whenever your done with practice you don't have to clean it before you put it up.
 

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Make sure your crossbow limbs/crosshairs are level It makes a big difference in windage at longer ranges.Depending on what target you use sometimes its easier to level the target and use it as a reference.
 

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Once you get it sighted in with the target tips, whether a twenty yard zero @ 20 yds and shoot to find where the little circle shoot to, or an inch high over the cross hair @ 20 yds to not have holdover issues out to probably 30 yds, you will need to find a broadhead that shoots to the same place as the target tips.

Some guys use fixed blades like the Slick Trick, I personally like the mechanical broadheads. I believe they are more accurate due to less of a tendency to plane. Either way,(I am sure someone will offer advise on this as well), keep in mind that the grain wt of the broadhead has a major influence on the arrow(bolt) flight as well.


When I changed over from Carbon bolts to XX75 aluminum the 125gr broadheads planed terribly, but 100 grain were much better. Even the mechanical heads flew much more accurately in the lighter version. I eventually got 3 inch groups at 50 yds with XX75 and 100gr heads.


Hope this helps. Just find the right combination and all will come together.
 
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