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what is the purpose or benefits of fletching your arrows with a helical twist? I used to have right helical on my arrows when I had 4 inch vanes and shot fixed broadheads. the only reason I did that was bc that's what my dad always did. Ive shot blazers fletched straight with mechanical heads for years now. im just curious to see if anybody uses helical fletching with the 2 inch vanes. I apologize if this has been discussed on here before.
 

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I may be misunderstanding you question but I use helical fletching on the arrows that are meant for my longbows and recurves. The helical configuration spins the arrow - like rifling does a bullet - and improves accuracy. It is my experience that helical fletching on an arrow fired from a compound bow does not add any advantage and in fact when fired through a wiskerbiscut tends to get deformed and degrades accuracy and longevity of the fletching.
I use right wing feathers and apply a specific right slanted helical cant when I fletch arrows for my trad-bows.
 

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Helical fletching goes back to the use of feathers- if they came off the right wing of a turkey, they would lay flatter on the shaft when applied with a right helix, and visa versa. Helical application with plastic vanes or even 2" Bohning Blazers began to impart a greater spin to the shaft during flight- using the ballistic application of rotation to stabilize flight.

I shoot all of my blazers- 2" for hunting and X2 vanes with a right helix. I found tighter groups and more consistant flight. I found that pure straight fletching was more susceptible to cross wind and was more like a knuckle ball- you never knew where it was ending up.

Somewhere in-between is the use of "Offset" where the vane is applied straight, with about a 3* offset from being straight down the shaft of the arrow. This also imparts more rotation, but not as much as helical.

The downside of severe helical vanes (like you get when you apply 5" feathers) is the arrow will drop due to deceleration faster once you get beyond 40 yards. The same wind resistance that causes rotation then causes a decrease in speed.

I don't buy pre-fletched arrows, but I think most arrow manufacturers are putting the vanes in an offset orientation.
 

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What Guru said, I use 2" blazers right helical for hunting and 4" right helical feathers for targets. I use a Bitzenburger jig with a right helical clamp to fletch my 2" blazers. I then offset the top of the clamp a couple degrees to the right and the bottom of the clamp either neutral or one degree to the left. I then dry fit the Blazer to my shaft to assure good contact on the shaft. This gives me a good helical with a short 2" vane and a very accurate arrow
 

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Right helical will give way more stabilization that strait.It was once common to fletch vanes off set in the days of the old prong rests.They didn't have enough clearance for a true helical.Today,with drop away rests,those clearance issues are a thing of the past.Right helical is preferred to left helical because an arrow spinning to the left can losses the BH upon impact.
 

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I still shoot aluminum because I have so many and they still work. I use right helical with 4" quick spins and I add a lot of helical. As a result my fixed blade broad heads shoot very accurate. However, they drop off a bit around 35-40 yards with my light 55 lb pull. Since I keep my shots to 25 yards or less they provide me with every thing I need to get a complete pass through on broadside shots.
 

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Here's one more tip for those using straight vane application (no helical or offset) with a fixed blade broad head...Tuning can become a real problem.

The vanes on an arrow are used to correct the flight of the arrow. If there is no rotation to the arrow, the front blades of the broad head and the straight vanes at the rear of the arrow work against one another- the broad head begins to steer the arrow. It can cause real headaches when trying to tune arrows. IMO if you are using fixed blade broadheads, you need a helix or at least an offset.
 

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I shoot a 4" right helical feather and they fly awesome...think of a football with and without a spiral, what is more accurate
 

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I shoot Blazers fletched in an Az EZ Fletch mini and it puts excellent helical on. I get great fixed blade flight out to 55 yards with this setup (as far as I can shoot at home).

I have tried 2" as well as 4" vanes and 2, 3, and 4" feathers. All fletched both straight and helical. I found for me, the 2" vanes with a helical give me the best groups with fixed blade heads. I want to shoot feathers because I like how they look better, but for hunting I prefer the Blazers.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks for all the input. im probably not going to change my set up but was curious to see what people thought.
 

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shot straight when i was young and dumb but helical just takes the cake. the explanations are already in this thread. best of luck.
 
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