The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I used to use the lightest arrow possible without "dry firing" the bow. I now use a heavier arrow/ fixed blade combo for more kinetic energy which should give better penetration. If your fixed blade cuts, the arrow will follow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
+1, but the FP and BH must tune to the same POA. I shoot a Beman 340 which is 9.3 GPI with a 125 gr. FP and BH. They have the same impact point out to the 50 yds. For deer, I use a 125 gr. Thunderhead, for elk and moose I use a 125 gr. COC Muzzy Phantom. All three hit the same point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,072 Posts
I used to be all about speed for my arrow combinations. i now realize that i like a heavier arrow. My arrow and broadhead are around 400 gr. Not to bad. Just be sure you have enough bow to get it to the point and stay in tune.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
everyone always wants to brag how fast their bow is... well thats all well an good if thats what your after. ive been sooting heavier arrows for a long time the ..kinetic energy is were its at..i only shoot 60# an 30" draw. i use mayham 350's an 100 gr. rage 2 blade an smoked 3 deer this year. an had clear pass threw on all 3 furthest shot was 30 yds. on my buck. so imo heavier arrow is better for good penitration..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,102 Posts
My arrows would be considered light by most, but for my DW they are between 6-7 gpp. My arrows are about 340 gr. & my DW is 53lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
700 gr laminated birch arrow. 150 fps hickory selfbow. complete pass thru at 18 yds.
She didnt care how fast the arrow flew
Placement is the key!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
finally glad to see this thread with people agreeing...

years now i got laughed at for shooting aluminums... and i laughed back when i killed a deer. they didnt realize i want that heavier arrow. Now i do hear they make a heavier carbons but i'll switch when i cant get aluminums anymore.

KE is where its at. when i brought that up they didnt quiet understand what i was getting at. i guess its easier said as "follow thru" to some.

anyway, im for heavier. i dont know how heavy i shoot. but i do know I'm shooting 250fps at 68#'s and a 75grain 3blade trophyridge 3-P...something is working out just fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
When I bought a new bow about 10 years ago I went to carbon arrows for the first time. I shot a buck (broadside double lung) and the arrow didn't even pass thru. The deer didn't go far but I was shocked since I always had pass thrus with my old bow shooting 60 lbs with fixed blades. I changed to heavier carbon arrows and I haven't had any problems since.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,812 Posts
Several years a go I used heavy arrows, but in the last several years I have reduced my arrow weight to a dainty 503grs. I have been shooting 57 lbs. at an astonishing 205+- fps.

I am getting total penetration on lung hit whitetail and black bear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
You go after really big pigs and you will have your answer. Heavy arrow wins everytime. But for deer, you dont really need to go heavy.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,524 Posts
Kinetic energy means absolutely nothing in terms of arrow penetration. A ping pong ball and a bb shot at 600 fps have the same weight, and thus the same kinetic energy. Shoot them both at a tin can, one will penetrate, one will bounce off. Kinetic energy only calculates the mechanical efficiency of one's bow. Momentum is a more important factor in penetration, and typically a heavier arrow at a slower speed will penetrate better, to some extent. At some point, too much arrow weight causes a low enough speed to reduce momentum again. The broadhead, the sectional density of the shaft, the shaft diameter, and the shaft coating all have a bearing as well. I prefer to shoot an arrow somewhere in between what most would consider light and heavy, to create a good combination of speed and penetration. 400 grains at 70# is my magic number for most North American big game. I like to be around that range to create the most speed possible without sacrificing penetration. A great broadhead and micro diameter shafts with a slick coating and a high sectional density also improve it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,578 Posts
shootbowtech said:
Kinetic energy means absolutely nothing in terms of arrow penetration. A ping pong ball and a bb shot at 600 fps have the same weight, and thus the same kinetic energy. Shoot them both at a tin can, one will penetrate, one will bounce off. Kinetic energy only calculates the mechanical efficiency of one's bow. Momentum is a more important factor in penetration, and typically a heavier arrow at a slower speed will penetrate better, to some extent. At some point, too much arrow weight causes a low enough speed to reduce momentum again. The broadhead, the sectional density of the shaft, the shaft diameter, and the shaft coating all have a bearing as well. I prefer to shoot an arrow somewhere in between what most would consider light and heavy, to create a good combination of speed and penetration. 400 grains at 70# is my magic number for most North American big game. I like to be around that range to create the most speed possible without sacrificing penetration. A great broadhead and micro diameter shafts with a slick coating and a high sectional density also improve it.
100% agree, momentum is where it is at
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
shootbowtech said:
Kinetic energy means absolutely nothing in terms of arrow penetration. A ping pong ball and a bb shot at 600 fps have the same weight, and thus the same kinetic energy. Shoot them both at a tin can, one will penetrate, one will bounce off. Kinetic energy only calculates the mechanical efficiency of one's bow. Momentum is a more important factor in penetration, and typically a heavier arrow at a slower speed will penetrate better, to some extent. At some point, too much arrow weight causes a low enough speed to reduce momentum again. The broadhead, the sectional density of the shaft, the shaft diameter, and the shaft coating all have a bearing as well. I prefer to shoot an arrow somewhere in between what most would consider light and heavy, to create a good combination of speed and penetration. 400 grains at 70# is my magic number for most North American big game. I like to be around that range to create the most speed possible without sacrificing penetration. A great broadhead and micro diameter shafts with a slick coating and a high sectional density also improve it.
I agree. Most people fail to realize this. I've stated it on here before and people argue it because of what they see on comercials. A high FOC is very important as well. I try to minimize friction the best I can, with a small diameter arrow (fmj) fletched with feathers and a two blade cut on contact head (175 gr). I build my arrows for the bad shots not the good ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
shootbowtech said:
At some point, too much arrow weight causes a low enough speed to reduce momentum again.
The law of diminishing returns. True for just about anything. Eventually you find the apex and start losing gains by going too far.

Out of compounds I like my arrows around 400-450 (only shooting 380 right now and have considered switching arrows) and out of trad gear I like it closer to 550. I shot a 600+ grain laminated birch arrow once and I didn't like it at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Yeah I should have pointed out I shoot 50# trad bows so I am at 11 gpp. I like the 100 grain 2 blade vented Magnus heads so I use brass inserts to get the weight up. Have to play a little with arrow length to get good flight but it's worth it.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top