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I attended the meeting last night. The meeting was mostly about the disease itself. They talked about some of the things they can do through executive orders, and gave out a preliminary map of the containment zone.
The disease itself sounds very nasty. there is no cure and the only way to test for it is after the deer is dead. The prion that causes it is a form of protein. The prion has no dna or rna so it should not be able to mutate. The prion can survive in soil for 15 to 16 years, so this aids in the spread of the disease. Birds and scavangers can spread the disease through their feces after they eat infected parts of the deer. The only way to destroy the prions is through extreme heat(2500 degrees) or a ph of 13 and several hours of 200 degree temps. They said the disease is here to stay and the only thing that the PGC can do is try to contain it.
The containment zone in a nutshell will be from Bedford, Everett to the south,to Tyrone to the north, the Juniata River to the east, and a little past Blueknob to the west. This is only preliminary as it could get bigger or smaller. Deer one was shot near Hollidaysburg. Deer two was shot near Roaring Spring. Deer three was shot near New Enterprise. They said deer one and two were shot by deer farms.
The PGC did not announce what any exectutive orders would be. They said some that could be likely are the banning of feeding, the banning of urine based attractions and some kind of checking of deer taken in the dma zone. They said announcments should be coming in the next 7 to 10 days.
All in all it was a very informative meeting. Lots of questions asked about deer farms, all were defered to the Department of Ag(who were in attendance), but they didn't answer any of them. The best question of the night was, Is this disease caused by global warming.
There will be more public meetings coming, if your in the area you should try to attend.
 

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Makes you wonder why Ag even showed up if they were unwilling to answer any questions!
 

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The best question of the night was, Is this disease caused by global warming.
Lemme guess. Asked by someone wearing a Red, White, Blue lapel button with a Donkey on it ?
 

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ROARING SPRING - Hunters turned Spring Cove Middle School's 500-seat auditorium into a sea of camouflage Wednesday as state Game Commission officers revealed the first hints of their response to chronic wasting disease in wild deer.

In an hours long presentation to a packed house, commission veterinarian Walt Cottrell and Bureau of Wildlife Management Director Calvin DuBrock detailed how the deadly deer illness' spreads and the prognosis for Blair and Bedford counties, the site of Pennsylvania's first wild outbreak......


"There is no place where this disease has ever occurred that it has been stopped," Cottrell said. "There are two things the disease does when it arrives: It gets worse, and it spreads."

Chronic wasting disease, which slowly destroys deer's brains and ends in certain death, spread to Pennsylvania sometime before the fall hunting season. While there's no evidence that the disease can affect humans, it decimates deer populations when it hits, Cottrell said.

In response, Game Commission officials have declared a "disease management area" ranging from the turnpike in Bedford County to a Tyrone-Huntingdon axis in the north and from Portage in the west to Raystown Lake in the east....


Those orders - likely to be developed in the coming weeks and revealed before fall - will affect deer on both private and public lands, he said.

DuBrock said commission officials haven't decided how far to extend new rules....

Deer hit by cars in the zone will be tested whenever possible, officials said, and further public hearings will be scheduled before the fall rifle season.

It's too late to stop the illness entirely, Cottrell cautioned. The protein that causes chronic wasting disease survives in the ground indefinitely, and with Pennsylvania's dense heavy deer population its spread is almost guaranteed, he said.

Cottrell said 48 percent of bucks in Wyoming, near the disease's national epicenter, are infected. Pennsylvania's deer population is 10 times as dense, he said, and therefore vastly more likely to transmit the deadly protein.

With the three positives found among just 192 local deer tested since fall, an audience member asked how many others already carry the disease in Blair and Bedford counties.

"More than three," Cottrell said.





http://www.altoonamirror.com/page/conten...ds.html?nav=742
 

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Standing room only in Roaring Spring Wednesday evening. Hundreds of hunters, farmers, and other outdoor enthusiasts all concerned over one thing--Chronic Wasting Disease in the local deer population.

Brad Myers, PA Game Commission, says, “We tested 3,000 deer for Chronic Wasting Disease. Three came back positive--all three from this area."

PA Game Commission officials say the affected deer were from Roaring Spring, Hollidaysburg, and New Enterprise. It's a deadly disease with no known treatment or cure. It's a big deal for the agricultural and wildlife community here in Pennsylvania--one of the biggest communities in the entire country.

Dr. Walt Cottrell, wildlife veterinarian, says, "There’s 1,100 propagators of deer and elk in PA. 25,000 animals behind the fence. Do we qualify? We're second only to Texas.”

The disease can spread very quickly and again is deadly. So the PA Game Commission wants to assure the public that they are aware of the issue and are attacking it at all fronts.

Myers adds, "We're going to do everything we can to help slow the progression of this disease."




http://www.wjactv.com/news/news/hundreds-concerned-over-chronic-wasting-disease-lo/nWymg/
 
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