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I was looking at buying the Barska 4X32 Crossbow scope,I am looking to spend under 100.00, but haven't heard much about these scopes. Has anyone used one on their crossbow before or heard anything good/bad ? Thanks.
 

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Don't know much about Barska crossbow scopes but for less than $100 you can get the tried and true Hawke MAP. IMO, the best crossbow scope in the <$100 category.
 

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Hawke optics makes some of the finest crossbow scopes in the world. Last year we had a 25% failure rate on one brand of well known scope. We sold four times as many Hawke scopes and didn't get a single one back. They also have a lifetime warranty. Hawke scopes
 

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How does the varizone(excalibur) compare to the Hawke?The only thing that I didn't care for on the map scope is that it looks cluttered.I was going to try the SR model with the circle's.
 

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That clutter is actually a rangefinder. Starting from the center, the ranges are 20,30,40 and 50 yards as you move down the scope. Looking through the scope you will see a small hash mark on each side of the vertical crosswire. Those hash marks are 6 inches at any given distance. The center to the fat part of the wire is 12 inches at the given distance. The right and left together equals 24 inches. Or, the front leg to the back leg of a mature whitetail. 12 inches is the nose to the back of the head. 6 inches is the ear opening of a mature deer.
It's a very effective system that is quite accurate. We have a captive deer herd that we tested it on and it's one of the best rangefinders I've seen in a crossbow scope.

How does it compare to the Vari-zone? Side by side, tested just a minute ago (it's 6:46 p.m. here now and almost dark) I would pick the Hawke. (my wife picked the Hawke also) There is a very slight difference and probably not enough to matter for hunting purposes. It's too dark to be shooting now anyway. The SR reticle clearly wins in this test, but I would imagine the Lumi-zone would be just as effective. (I don't have one in stock at the moment)

Overall, I give the win to the Hawke because of it's rangefinding capabilities.
 

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Wow Mike, that's exactly the choice presented to me at the moment. Hawke MAP vs Excal Lumi-zone, both "in hand" at the moment. As I explained to you on the phone the other day, I am considering replacing the MAP on my new Terminator with the Lumi-zone that I had on my previous crossbow and I've been very back and forth with it. Thanks for explaining the sidemarks on the MAP reticle as I was a bit confused about that.

Another novice question, the ring that's closest to the eye end of the scope, it moves and changes the power on the scope. Where is the best setting for that adjustment?

Thanks again for the time the other day on the phone, as many have said you're a great guy to deal with!

Greg
 

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The ring closest your eye on the Hawke is a focus ring. My old eyes need it about one turn out, to get the crosswires in focus.
On the Excal it's a variable power ring marked with f.p.s. The Terminator will want it set at 340 or just a bit more. We sight in at 20 yards, move out to 40 and turn the ring until it hits the center of the target with the 40 yard point. The Excal scope also has a focus at the eye end.
 

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My eyes take more than one turn.My eyes changed from the first year and the scope needed adjustment.It was easy though because I lost my scope cover.It has been replaced though.I loose them all the time hunting the way I do.The thick stuff works but it has it's problems.You deal with it.Jett the Hawke MAP is a great scope use it and get comfortable with it.It won't let you down when the time comes.In my opinion people that use range finders that are hand held waste needed time for the shot.The animal may be gone or spooked from excess time or movement.The Hawke scope does it for you.No wasted time or movement.Just hunt buddy.Whatever you do.I would like to see you in the woods.If you lived closer I would give you a couple spots to get you started.
 

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I'm waiting for my Victories from arrowhead before I shoot my new Terminator. Can't wait to send a few arrows down range and get a feel for the MAP. I have to wrap my mind around the rangefinding capabilities of the MAP vs the illuminated reticle and variable speed capabilities of the Lumi-zone. Kind of a no lose situation picking between those 2 scopes!
 

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I should add that you will need to download the free BRC ballistics program for the Hawke. It helps to get the ranges of the reticle dialed in. On the Tornado they are basically 20,30,40 and 50 yards. It even lets you print a chart for under your scope cap. It's located HERE
 

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I just did. Do you happen to know the fps of the Victories I ordered with a 100 and 125 gr heads out of a Terminator? Also, any info on the ED value with the above heads would be a help.

Scope height is measured from the top of the rail to the center of the scope tube, correct?

Thanks!
 

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They will be about 345 f.p.s. with the 100 grains and 338 with the 125 grain heads.
Scope height is measured from center of arrow to center of scope. (I use 2.15)

I like to calculate the ED from POI. (point of impact) when I don't have a chronograph available.

ED Calculation from POI
Calculating the ED Value from the position of the Point of Impact can give accurate results if the various measurements are done with precision. This particular method of estimating the ED Value value is especially useful if used in conjunction with published manufacturer's ballistic data.

When the applet opens, the various textboxes are filled with data from the main BRC application (Muzzle Velocity, Scope Height and Zero Range) and the POI is calculated (based on a target range of 2 x Zero Range). Any or all of these textboxes can be altered to suit your particular circumstances without altering the Data Input Panel of the main BRC application. For example, if the maximum range that you have available is just 40 Yards then change the @ Range value to 40 and, after carefully measuring the vertical distance between the aim-point and point of impact, enter the measured POI distance in the Point of Impact textbox. Click on the Calculate button to calculate the ED Value value. Click accept and it will save the ED value.
Sounds very confusing at first, but once you get the hang of it...it really isn't.

I found a chart we used for a Terminator. The ED value was .0351 with that particular bow/arrow combination.
 

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arrowhead said:
They will be about 345 f.p.s. with the 100 grains and 338 with the 125 grain heads.
Scope height is measured from center of arrow to center of scope. (I use 2.15)

I like to calculate the ED from POI. (point of impact) when I don't have a chronograph available.

ED Calculation from POI
Calculating the ED Value from the position of the Point of Impact can give accurate results if the various measurements are done with precision. This particular method of estimating the ED Value value is especially useful if used in conjunction with published manufacturer's ballistic data.

When the applet opens, the various textboxes are filled with data from the main BRC application (Muzzle Velocity, Scope Height and Zero Range) and the POI is calculated (based on a target range of 2 x Zero Range). Any or all of these textboxes can be altered to suit your particular circumstances without altering the Data Input Panel of the main BRC application. For example, if the maximum range that you have available is just 40 Yards then change the @ Range value to 40 and, after carefully measuring the vertical distance between the aim-point and point of impact, enter the measured POI distance in the Point of Impact textbox. Click on the Calculate button to calculate the ED Value value. Click accept and it will save the ED value.
Sounds very confusing at first, but once you get the hang of it...it really isn't.

I found a chart we used for a Terminator. The ED value was .0351 with that particular bow/arrow combination.
Thanks for adding the ED value. I take it that's with the 100 gr head?

So if I were to try to arrive at this myself, at a 40 yd distance, I would aim using the 20 yd crosshair(zero range) and measure the drop to the point of impact?
 

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Yes that is for the 100 grain head. I should have specified.
Yes, that is correct for the ED measurement. You simply measure the drop and plug it into the POI calculator.
 
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