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Got a doe this morning at 715. Got her home skinned and cleaned. I would like to let it hang for a few days but with the Temps getting to the mid 50s not sure if that is a good idea. I was thinking if I opened the windows at night and had a fan blowing the cold air into the garage(closing around 6am) that it would keep the temperature hopefully below 50 during the day. What's your thoughts?????
 

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I wouldn't...

Quarter and put in cooler with ice or in fridge. Otherwise, I would butcher right away.
 

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I am letting my son's hang till morning then quartering and putting in the cooler.
 

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agree w hunter477. out of direct sunlight and w/ 30-50 averaging out to 40...just fine. done it a few times and no probs.

congrats

Nut
 

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casey said:
huntr4477 said:
should be fine for a few days,as long as it's inside,out of the direct sunlight.

Bob
That's what I'll say, too, but there are a few keys to making sure the meat doesn't spoil.

1. Do not let flys land on it -- that should not be difficult this time of year, but if you have flys then cover the meat.
2. Let the surface of the meat dry. This will seal it and keep the interior of the muscles from being exposed to bacteria.
3. Do not try to wash it. If it gets wet, surface bacteria will suddenly thrive and you'll lose the meat. If there's dirt and hair on it, wait until you cut it up and trim all that away.
4. Do not cut it off the bone in warm weather. You will introduce bacteria with every cut.
5. When you butcher it, do not try to save any bloodshot meat. That's where it will spoil first.
6. If you grind any of it, do it quickly after butching, and freeze it or process it right away. Ground meat will spoil much faster than whole muscles.

This is also my experience with deer, and I have been cutting up my own deer since 19-never-mind. I have never had one spoil. Also, my brother and I each shot a moose in Alaska one year on Labor Day, and the daytime temperatures reached 50 degrees. By the time we flew out on Saturday, drove 8 hours to Anchorage on Sunday, and cut the meat up Monday and Tuesday in a friend's garage, it was still good despite the warm weather.

For more guidance you can probably find a chart recommending temperatures relating to time. Any chart you find will probably be commercial recommendations, which will be on the conservative side. Finally, if it stinks, take no chances. Throw it away.

Steve.
 

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If you want it to age some I would quarter it and put it on ice in a cooler and drain the water out daily,then butcher when you are ready.
 

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With 50 degree temps, I would be cutting it up tomorrow morning.

Exactly what I am going to do to mine, letting it hang overnight and cutting it up in morning. I have done quite a few this way and no problems.

Any warmer, I am quatering and putting in a fridge or cooler til following day.
 

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Everyday Hunter said:
casey said:
huntr4477 said:
should be fine for a few days,as long as it's inside,out of the direct sunlight.

Bob
That's what I'll say, too, but there are a few keys to making sure the meat doesn't spoil.

1. Do not let flys land on it -- that should not be difficult this time of year, but if you have flys then cover the meat.
2. Let the surface of the meat dry. This will seal it and keep the interior of the muscles from being exposed to bacteria.
3. Do not try to wash it. If it gets wet, surface bacteria will suddenly thrive and you'll lose the meat. If there's dirt and hair on it, wait until you cut it up and trim all that away.
4. Do not cut it off the bone in warm weather. You will introduce bacteria with every cut.
5. When you butcher it, do not try to save any bloodshot meat. That's where it will spoil first.
6. If you grind any of it, do it quickly after butching, and freeze it or process it right away. Ground meat will spoil much faster than whole muscles.

This is also my experience with deer, and I have been cutting up my own deer since 19-never-mind. I have never had one spoil. Also, my brother and I each shot a moose in Alaska one year on Labor Day, and the daytime temperatures reached 50 degrees. By the time we flew out on Saturday, drove 8 hours to Anchorage on Sunday, and cut the meat up Monday and Tuesday in a friend's garage, it was still good despite the warm weather.

For more guidance you can probably find a chart recommending temperatures relating to time. Any chart you find will probably be commercial recommendations, which will be on the conservative side. Finally, if it stinks, take no chances. Throw it away.

Steve.
I probably ought to add a little to what I've said. I'm working on the final quarter of a buck I killed on Monday, and he is still fine. He has been hanging in my attached, unheated garage.

A garage will not get as cold as outside temps overnight, but it will also not warm up to outside temps during the daytime.

The only time I've ever had problems is when I've tried to save bloodshot meat. I make my meat very clean -- much cleaner than any butcher will do for you because he doesn't have the time. But I don't have the patience to mess with bloodshot areas. I just throw that away. I may not get as much edible meat from a deer as others do, but I won't mess with bloodshot meat.

Finally, use your own judgment. Just because my experience has been good, it doesn't mean you will have the exact same conditions. So be conservative. It's better to cut up your deer quickly than try to stretch it out to the limit. I certainly will not argue with anyone who recommends immediate butchering in 50-degree weather.

Steve.
 

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My son and I both connected today. I just got done quartering and I have all the quarters hanging on hooks in the garage. It's down to 34 already. I think I will let them hang where they are until morning and then cut every thing up.
 

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So easy to quarter and throw in fridge. Surprising how you can shuffle things around and jam 4 quarters and a neck almost entirely on one shelf
 

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Stayed pretty cold today. Got my sons deer skinned by 1 pm gonna let it hang over night then in a cooler tomorrow. Gonna be partially froze in the morning.
 

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Okay where to start.

If it were me pack with ice and de-bone and place in cooler place. Now, will it be okay with what you are planning ??, I would say yes but 50 can turn into 45 or 55. Ideal is right around 33-37 deg. closer to 33 the better.

First right after out of woods if warm or going to get warm pack with ice.

Number one trouble is hunters gutting the deer. Watch cutting them open too much in field. All you do is expose meat to dirt and trash. Do a finish job once it out and of field and back at camp etc. If I'm close to home I remove intestines and stomach that it.

If you cut or shoot it in the gut and get it all over meat. Wash with water, make a salt and baking soda paste scrub and rinse and reply if needed and or leave coat of mix on.

Aging meat is better at cold temps.

If you think it is too warm it normally is.

Skinned meat in open air will get too dry after a day if that long. Maybe a good idea to cover with plastic wrap.

NO SUN LIGHT AT ALL !!
 

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You'll be aok. Freeze a few milk jugs of water, and stick them inside the body cavity during the daylight hours. Aged venison can't be beat.
 
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