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I recently attended a habitat workshop in Lenawee Co.( SE Michigan), hosted by Jake Ehlinger. Jake is the owner of Habitat Solutions 360LLC. He provides long and short term habitat plans to property owners of the Midwest. His property is 67 ac., of which, approx. 10 ac. or so is standing water swamp. He has been very successful in killing 4 and 5yr. olds the past 10 yrs or so. The most interesting part of the tour for me was how big the property hunts. After walking the 55 or so huntable acres, it felt like we toured a property of 200+ acres. He has achieved this through complete compartmentalization of his farm (which he has been working on for the last 30 some years). He uses NWSG,Hybrid Sorghum, Miscanthus grasses, planted conifers, and tons of hinge cuts to screen his access and creates a lot of separation between the doe family groups and bucks that reside on the property. He uses a ton of licking branches (existing branches and vines he attaches to span wires between two trees or he wires them to branches that are too high, or horizontal). He also likes to plant perennials in his hinge cut bedding areas and escape trails throughout bedding trails. He has a bunch of micro-plots within cover and two destination plots, mostly in the front of the property. I was also surprised with how close he was getting mature bucks to bed with relation to does (30-40 yards with in some instances) with great hinge cut screening. I had seen his property and story in “quality whitetails magazine” and also on his online videos. Jake was a great down-to-earth guy and the property was great to see in person. Nothing ground breaking but you get a different perspective seeing it up close.
 

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Sorry guys, I took some but I couldn't get any that would show what was really going on. I took a few from the workbook he supplied, hope they help. Also go on his website and check out some of his video's, and type his address into google maps 16566 Manitou Beach Rd
 

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Very interesting stuff.

Here's an idea for (maybe?) getting similar habitat with a low cost and labor approach.

Couldn't you get cover and screening for compartmentalization by just letting parts of an old field grow up in goldenrod?

Goldenrod comes into old fields on its own in many places. No planting or seedbed preparation or liming or fertilizing or herbicide required.

It gets tall and thick enough to provide cover. And if left for a few years, you'll get some brush coming in, which provides additional cover and screening. Again, no need to plant it, it will arrive.

Then if you don't want the brush reverting to forest, you should probably brush hog it when the brush stems get to about 1 1/2 inches in diameter, or 2 inches tops. Bigger than that and it becomes difficult to brush hog. Brush hog it down and it will come back up in grasses and forbs.

So, you can create a compartmentalized patchwork just by planning where you mow and where you don't, and shifting things around over the years, so that it never reverts to forest if you prefer that it doesn't.

Then within the brush-hog maintained patchwork, you could put in some small food plots here and there.
 

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For sure, I have 3 fields that i'm going to mess around with (5,6 and 7 ac.) that are old pasture fields that are in the early stages of regeneration. Unfortunately i have been mowing them on and off for the last 10 yrs. This has caused a lot of cool season grasses to grow in with the goldenrod and other desirable weeds and forbs which slows down the growth of the better cover i'm trying to promote. Eventually would like to plant some evergreen trees in clumps along with some hardwoods and have some paths mowed throughout the field with a few small plots within shooting distance of the couple of existing mature trees. The only problem is, my project list as it stands now will take about 15 yrs to complete. You are spot on with your thinking,it should definitely be a great addition to any property. i'm sure i'll get to one of them in the next few years
 
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