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Discussion Starter #1
I might have a line on a nice old gun that needs a stock. Trouble I'm having is everytime I try to search trying to find someplace that sells just the wood all I come up with are company's selling actual stocks or blanks. I just need a hunk of wood, I have the bandsaw and all carving tools from carving decoys. Anyone have any suggestions where I can find a selection of wood? I'm not necessarily interested in walnut, just anything that isn't straight grained lumber.
 

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I took a large walnut tree down a few years ago and my buddy wanted a section to make a stock for one of his guns. I cut the piece longer than he needed then slabbed it with my chainsaw about 10 inches thick. He put it in his garage to dry for over a year before we carved his stock.

You may be able to get some ruff cut wood at a local sawmill or find someone with a portable mill that can cut a slab for you.

Good Luck
 

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Gunstock blanks are air dryed 1 year for every inch of thickness...then into the kiln.

Some think that's over kill, and that's OK if they do. But you're going to invest a lot of time into carving and inletting and final finish. You can do what you want..I'm just giving you food for thought.

Is this an old relic that could have some value if the original stock was carefully reproduced. Or is it just a nice old gun that would make good everyday beater?
 

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Curley summed it up pretty well.

The kiln drying process might seem a little overboard but when you inlet the barrel and action and shape the rest, you are left with very little meat. If the wood is not dried properly, stocks tend to twist once inletted.

The climate where the wood is grown also greatly affects the quality of a stock. Eastern Walnut and even some British and French Walnuts are very porous and don't cut very nicely when inletting. California Walnut seems to be quite a bit nicer but cost a bit more than most others.
 

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What are you calling a blank?

A blank is what you are looking for, which is basically just a squared up slab of wood, on which you draw the shape of the stock you want, and start cutting from there.....

there are blanks on ebay all of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, it is just a blank that I'm looking for. I don't want to "find" something locally, because of the issues of drying it out. I've carved plenty of wood with decoys and I know what troubles you run into with "damp" wood.

Good call buck, all that I have been able to find are the roughed out "blanks" that have been formed on a bandsaw. All I really want is a slab of wood, whether that be cleaned up or still rough cut.

I'm kind of putting the cart before the horse here. I should probably acquire the rifle first before I go any further. Thanks for the replies.
 

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I have some black walnut blanks cut in 1991. Have been doing what your looking to do for 30+years. PM me if your interested and I might part with one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, they weren't willing to come down to something reasonable. It was a 30-40 Krag that I found at a local gunshop. Too bad they wouldn't come down another $40. Oh well, time to keep an eye open for the next project.
 

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That's what you have to do. Look for something that has enough meat left on the bone to make the repairs without going in the hole.
 

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Buckshot1822 said:
there are blanks on ebay all of the time.
This.

Picked up a REALLY nice piece of Turkish for a stock for the Mrs.' Sako for a very fair price.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So, I'm resurrecting this thread as I got a line on some black walnut. Looked at some last night and there are quite a few crotches that I can grab. Trouble is some are on the small side. Is there a rule of thumb for diameter needed to get a stock? I realize I can't(or shouldn't) use the pith, so that leaves a slab off each side. I just don't want to grab some logs and find out they are way too small.
 
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