The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently had the pleasure of shooting at the Orvis grounds in Sandanona, NY. I got to shoot a 20 gauge Caeser Guerini O/U gun, and to say the gun left an impression on me is an understatement. The entire experience definitely made me want to get a nice gun and shoot more often. I own 5 or 6 12 gauges, all of them pumps (Remington 870s, Old Ithaca Model 37s, etc. and Mossberg 835s), all of which I've killed upland birds and/or turkeys with. However, while all are very nice shotguns which I'm very happy with, I'd really like to get a double gun. I've shot both O/U and side-by-side, but I guess I tend to gravitate to the over under.

Can you pros give me some gun recommendations? Here are some general guidelines:

- fit - I'm 6'8" tall and have very long arms, but I manage well with most guns
- price - I don't want to spend $10,000 on a shotgun at this point in my life. What should I really expect to spend? How much gun can I get for $500/$1,000/$3,000/$5,000?
- use - I will use this gun to hunt upland birds and break clay birds, if this gun gets shot more than 20 times in a year, then I have had a great year.

I know that there are a lot of talented hunters here with a lot of nice guns. So, without giving me a 30 paragraph diatribe about ethics, do you think you could suggest a few guns to look into or share some advice about double guns with a novice?

Thank you very much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The length of pull was 15 and 7/8" I believe. It was the longest gun they had. 28" barrels and around 43" overall? Does that sound right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,160 Posts
I've shot SKB O/U's for over 40 yrs. for everything from upland birds to waterfowl to trap. They were originally imported by Ithaca and, more recently I believe, by Weatherby. They are a very reliable and well-built shotgun at reasonable prices. You could check gunbroker.com for availability. The older ones were fixed choke but the newer imports have choke tubes. Go with an IC/Mod if you get a fixed choke O/U.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,712 Posts
I swiped my Pops Charles Daly 20ga.(made by Miriko/Japanese)(not sure who's making CD's now) that he got back in the 70's. You might want to check them out. I don't do much small game hunting anymore mostly just doves and it's worked flawlessly firing 2 boxes of shells at those things
.... also older gun fixed chokes mine is F/Mod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
I have an American Arms O/U 20 gauge that is actually made in Italy. It was my father's first and although it is slightly heavy and way to pretty for busting brush I shoot it well and fits well into the shoulder pocket when I'm not dressed bulky. It was a $1,200.00 gun 15 yrs ago. I don't know what it would cost now but I will say you can feel the difference between a $500 gun and a $1,000 one and I've fired a few in the $2,000 range and honestly always wondered why spend $2,000 on a gun but when you shoot it, it will make you realize that the gun is priced at $2,000 because it's in a totally different league. Firmly cements my believe that you get what you pay for!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Caesar Guerini makes a nice gun over a wide range of prices. They also offer both right and left handed stocks which is great for this southpaw shooter. The guns mechanically are identical it’s the level of engraving and the wood that can drive the prices up. I would not hesitate to pick a CG if they fit you and are within your price range ($2,900-10,000) range. I really like the looks of the Woodlander which is on the low end of the price range as well as the Magnus serious which are in the low to middle part of the range. All CG's come with a lifetime warrantee from CG USA and their customer service is the best I have experienced. Here is my Magnus light which is by far my favorite upland gun.



Beretta makes a great gun as well and the lower end guns are pretty reasonable ($1,800 range). Mechanically the 680’s series of Berettas are pretty much the same so the higher priced models are basically engraving and wood just like the CG. A Beretta Silver Pigeon I would be a great option and not break the bank. This is a Beretta Ultralight Deluxe which is my second favorite upland gun.



Browning Citori's are also great although in my opinion they have a different "feel" to them than the CG and the Beretta. Only you can tell which one you like more. Citori's are a great value especially in the used market and are very reliable. I have a couple with tens of thousands of rounds thru them and they have never needed any kind of service. Here is a little 20 I use for grouse and woodcock from time to time. It was like new in the original box on gunbroker and I paid much less than the price for a new one. One note, the field grade Citori's typically have a shorter length of pull and more drop in the comb than the CG and Beretta so I would shoot one first to see if it would work for you.





I really think you cannot go wrong with any of these options. Good luck with you search!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
I'm 6-3 and was fitted at 15 7/8"....while fine for targets, I shoot much less length equally well when hunting.
LOP is less important than either balance or simply liking the gun.
Additionally, a long length of pull will most often require a perfect push-away mount...tougher when tired or in less than optimum shooting positions and cover.
Your height though may carry xtra requirements...just do not follow the "fitted is best" idea too devoutly.

Any of the presently popular Italian or the Browning O/Us will serve a hunter well. I would pick based upon balance, grip diameter, comb fit(as 6'8 implies a long neck) and any guns at which you enjoy looking.
I would, especially with Berettas, consider used.
Jaquas did allow some guns to be fired on the range, if that is of interest.

Basically and usually, O/U scatterguns under 1K will not equal in longevity or trigger pull those guns of 2K but, for the most part, price past 2K is most about ornamentation and marquee.
Any model though, besides the super low dollar offerings, will easily digest 10-15K targets a year w/o a burp.

Take your time, borrow some guns to try, carry a slip-on pad with you to test those borrowed guns as needed and do not be in a hurry to purchase. The more you shoot, the more you will refine what your needs are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I would have to say I agree with icemole. If your just shooting casually and dont want to spend a small fortune I think an older Charles Daly would fit the bill.They were made in Miroku Japan. The engraving the blueing and the wood are all spectacular. They will go the long haul. I bet you could find a decent 20 gauge on Gunbroker. Then have Mike Orlen open the chokes and then have the stock lengthened to suit you and still be under one thousand dollars. Not saying this is my choice of gun or the best gun but it will be great for the money spent and it will be quality. Personally I prefer the American side by side or an early made pump like your Ithaca 37. Good luck. Let us know what you find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,981 Posts
IMO get a quality O/U meaning a "B" gun (beretta or browning) you can always sell it down the line if you decide to get more into target shooting or keep it for hunting and buy a target/clays gun that tend to cost more. The beretta silver pigeon 1 is a great value at under 2K as is a browning citori. The browning 725 is relatively new but is a great gun also but field models go for around $2500 or so. Any of these will outlast you. There are fancier versions of these with nicer wood, engraving, etc. but the actions are the same. REAL upgrades from these guns in target models (somewhat less suitable for hunting) usually start in the 4K+++ range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Also recommend a B gun... Beretta or Browning... what ever fits you best... lots of these guns on the used market at reduced prices...

G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
Forestcohunter,
If possible I suggest you shoot a few more shotguns that
fit you properly, before you invest in anything. The B guns are nice, however if you have the money, for a nice Grouse
gun, a Parker or an L.C. Smith are fantastic SxS double guns.
You may find you want a nice Hammer Gun instead of a hammerless, lots of real nice double guns to look over before you purchase. Churchill makes a great O/U and there are many others. When you are talking about purchasing a good shotgun, go slow and look things over, good shotguns usually cost serious money.
Pine Creek/Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
All,

Thank you very much for this informative thread. I see that I have a lot of information to consider and I expect that I will travel over to Jaqua's when I'm next home in Western PA.

I do intend to shoot more guns before making a purchase, but I look forward to owning something different. New vs. used makes no difference to me, so long as the gun is well maintained. When I have done some narrowing of the available choices, I'll come back and revive this thread to see if you all would like to give some opinions.

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
Simply put BERETTA
Can spend a little or a lot. Plenty of configurations to choose from, ie. Barrel length, engraving, etc. Go plain, go fancy, buy a quality gun to start.
From what you described you want to do with it. I'd look at a 686, or 687 series with 28 or 30" tubes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
I agree with Dave. The 'B' guns are fantastic but may not be for you. When you find the gun for you... You will know it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Also you should at least look at an AYA.Absolutely beautiful gun,Especially the #2.Was at Cabelas in hamburg,Pa and had one in 16 ga in my arms.Love at first sight.Beautiful oil finish,engraving and light as a feather.Think that will be my next one.for about $4ooo.Lot of money yes but the pride you get hunting and owning a fine firearm as this is something to behold.Am I rich,of course not so I will save to get one and not just pick up anything.Do I need something like this,NO.I deserve it,LOL.Old german saying,"Just for nice",LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
Pine-Creek said:
Forestcohunter,
If possible I suggest you shoot a few more shotguns that
fit you properly, before you invest in anything. The B guns are nice, however if you have the money, for a nice Grouse
gun, a Parker or an L.C. Smith are fantastic SxS double guns.
You may find you want a nice Hammer Gun instead of a hammerless, lots of real nice double guns to look over before you purchase. Churchill makes a great O/U and there are many others. When you are talking about purchasing a good shotgun, go slow and look things over, good shotguns usually cost serious money. What does your high end vintage grouse gun do better then my Ithaca SKB 280E? I know yours looks nicer, has more collector value, and has a sentimental value of days gone by. That's about where it ends though. Field use shotguns are a matter of taste. Rifles are different. More money buys you more performance.
Pine Creek/Dave
That is not true. That's opinion based on your preference for old time nostalgic upland guns. Good shotguns can be had for a few hundred dollars. I have hunted with and owned several SKB shotguns that will perform as well as $4000 classic shotguns. Higher price range brings you into a world of better fit and finish. It does not take you into the realm of "good shotguns".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
ForestCoHunter,

If I were you I would get fitted by a professional before I spent that kind of money on a gun. It will be the best couple of hundred you ever spent.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top