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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any general tips as to how to go about hunting grouse without a dog? I have been kicking up a few totally on accident and I would like to actually target them when the squirrels aren't cooperating. Is it best to walk slow, fast, straight, zigzag? Just looking for some basic techniques to get me started.
 

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from my experience the best i can say is get stuck trying to get under a tree branch or any other position that is impossible to shoot from then theyll flush and scare the [censored] out of you at the same time.
 

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This is how I hunt them without a dog. Walk at a normal pace for about 20 or 30 yards then stop and stand still for a minute or 2. If they are close when you stop it makes them nervous and they flush after you have stood there for a little bit. If there are logging roads or paths I use them and do the same thing and usaully flush them from the sides close to the road or path. I always see more grouse while doing this when I have my 22. If you watch closely you can see them walking on the ground.
 

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If you are alone a slow zig zag stopping every few feet would be about effective as anything. Sometimes more effective than with a dog
Just not as much fun as having a companion to share it with.
 

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I've often thought that if killing birds was the most important thing to me I'd probably kill as many, or more, without a dog. To me though, seeing a dog on point is 90% of the thrill. Also it's nice when you're older to be able to walk the trails and let the dogs bust the brush.
 

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I used to hunt a lot for grouse without a dog. They can be hunted effectively without a dog - much more so than pheasant and woodcock. Grouse normally have no qualms about flying (unlike pheasant and woodcock) and will take off when you get too close.

There are 2 downsides, though. It means that you will have to go into the thick stuff yourself which makes it harder to get a good shot. Second, it means you are going to have to search for any birds you hit. Finding a downed grouse can be a lot harder than it sounds.
 

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Gary is correct. I hunt the same way when I hunt grouse. I would only add...I hold my shotgun at the ready position at all times. Doc in Pa. PS.. So far this season... seven shots and one Grouse. Happy Days..Good luck to all Grouse hunters. Doc in Pa.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the replies. It is funny how little time they give you when you are at the most ready, but when you are just walking and not expecting to see one they seem to present the perfect shot...because you are in no position to shoot. I may have to try to target them over Thanksgiving.
 
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