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I am sure someone will come up with a solution to the owls eating these threatened species. Of course the problem will be blamed on lacking habitat, not on the owls.
 

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bpottorff said:
I am sure someone will come up with a solution to the owls eating these threatened species. Of course the problem will be blamed on lacking habitat, not on the owls.
Not sure that anyone will interfere with Nature's nature...or should.

I'm more concerned that nothing will be done to change the downward trend of the golden-winged warbler, as but one neo-tropical and one early successional species in decline, from human decisions and placement of value.
We make some pretty poor leaps of judgement in that regard.
 

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About a year ago I saw an Audubon study that documented the decline of songbird species. Interestingly enough, the declines started in the early 70's. Also, interestingly enough (and the Audubon study did NOT mention this.....go figure) is that the early 70's is when all birds of prey received their blanket protection.

I have no biology degree. But I do have eyes and a fairly reasoning mind. Seems to me that, locally, Cooper's and sharp-shinned hawks would take a MUCH greater toll on songbirds than GHO's.
 

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Yes, Strut it makes sense, and as the songbirds and other birds declined deerticks expanded their range. A fair reasoning mind would lead one to believe that as hawks and owl numbers increased they were responsible for the decline of their prey species that eat ticks, thus the rise and expansion of the deer tick, and finally todays many cases of lyme desease.
 

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eyefromthesky said:
Makes sense because birds of prey are the only things that eat birds. It wouldn't have anything to do with loss of habitat?
Dont forget free roaming cats
 

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No their not the only ones to eat the birds just a n uncontrolled factor. As far as habitat, I think we have plenty of habitat for birds to nest such as trees and bushes. If you want I would be more than willing to take you for a drive in my local area to look at suitable habitat. Good enough with food and nesting cover, but sadly not the hawk proof habitat that some think is needed. Its not the habitat eating the prey its the predators.
 

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I think I posted this before, maybe even to you directly, but there are far more predators of songbirds than just hawks and owls. Just off the top of my head...

Bears
Coyotes
Foxes
Skunks
Raccoons
Crows
Blue Jays
Weasels
Chipmunks
Squirrels
Bobcats
House Cats
Opossum
Snakes
and yes....even Deer on occasion!
 

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R.W.J said:
eyefromthesky said:
Makes sense because birds of prey are the only things that eat birds. It wouldn't have anything to do with loss of habitat?
Dont forget free roaming cats
Thousands and thousands of them that kill millions of native birds and small animals.
 

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Good list, and you pointed out the problem. Most every so called bird predator on your list has a hunting season. Hawks and owls do not. And out of that list the only one I have personally seen kill birds are cats. No doubt te others do to some extent as well. But I have seen more hawks catch birds than even cats. Coopers and sharpshined probably kill more, than all the animals listed on your list.
 

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Mrs. called me one day about ten years ago, wanted me to rush home because a "pheasant" was up in the barn rafters chasing her chickens. Told her to shut the door, I gotta see a pheasant that would go into a barn and chase chickens.

sure enough, a cooper, the "carnivorous pheasant."

In 1994, I toured the Fed fish hatchery at the Garrison Dam, ND. The tour guide was lamenting the number of endangered fish they lose, just in the holding ponds to birds of prey. I spent a week on the Missouri and never saw an Eagle, except the dozen or so which hung out for easy pickens at the hatchery. Now we have a couple hundred Bald Eagles just on the lower Susquehanna.
 
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