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Discussion Starter #1
I am typically a bait fisherman and after seeing some of the posts on here of a few of you that are catching 30+ fish on artificials I am intrigued. For me catching 2-4 fish in an hour on a stocked stream is doing good. I have had days where I have caught more and days were I have caught less. I am generally happy in the 2-4 range. I have piles of spinners in my vest mostly rooster tails and joes flies that I carry around and never use. My question is what are your go to lures as I would like to lighten the load that I carry and also try something different. I fully understand that the presentation is just as important as the lure. Suggestions recommendations on technique are welcomed as well. Thanks nomad.
 

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nomad_archer said:
I am typically a bait fisherman and after seeing some of the posts on here of a few of you that are catching 30+ fish on artificials I am intrigued. For me catching 2-4 fish in an hour on a stocked stream is doing good. I have had days where I have caught more and days were I have caught less. I am generally happy in the 2-4 range. I have piles of spinners in my vest mostly rooster tails and joes flies that I carry around and never use. My question is what are your go to lures as I would like to lighten the load that I carry and also try something different. I fully understand that the presentation is just as important as the lure. Suggestions recommendations on technique are welcomed as well. Thanks nomad.
Most, not all, of the people that catch 30 or more trout in a day tend to fish mostly wild trout streams as opposed to stocked streams. Stocked streams generally receive much more pressure and pressure, especially recent pressure, tends to keep catch rates lower.

As you said you are mostly a bait fisherman, do you tend to fish one spot for a long period of time? I believe about 90% of trout are caught on spinners hit on the first cast and almost all within three casts. As a result, successful spinner fishers must cover more water and as a result, they present their lures to more trout.

Another question: do you fish the whole stream or concentrate on the pools? Many people ignore riffles and pocket water, which is a big mistake. I also suggest you fish upstream, which you may already do. Most people fish downstream, and as a result, scare about 90% of the trout.

As to your original question on which spinners to use, like you, I used to use Roostertails and Joe's Flies. I haven't used either of them for years. When I used Joe's Flies, they were too light and I don't add weight to spinners because I believe it hurts the action. The spinners I use now are homemade ones made by my father years ago. The only store bought spinners I use now are Blue Foxes. You should be able to catch trout on the spinners that you have. I'm not a big believer that color makes a big difference, with an exception for certain conditions. I will say that bright or loud colored spinners generally work much better on stocked trout than wild ones.

The final thing I would suggest is to avoid the tiny spinners (size 0 and 00). They are generally too light and don't get down deep enough. I suggest using a spinner that is at least 1/8 ounce.

Does that help? I'm sure that others will have some valuable tips for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lots of great info already. Thank you and thank you again. These are things I never really thought about. To your questions.

I tend to move a lot. If I don't pick up a fish in the first few drifts through a hole or riffles I am moving on. I will say if I catch a fish in a particular spot I will stay and see if I can't pick up a few more but unless I am catching fish I am typically moving. The stocked stream I am fishing now seems like it gets a lot of regular pressure at least close to the parking area. I like to work some riffles now and again. I focus on deeper runs with good current. I will also fish little pockets and under cuts. I don't spend much time in big holes as it seems like that is where everyone fishes. I fish up and down stream but try to stay out of the water as much as possible when moving between spots.

I think the big thing here is I need to find wild trout waters. I don't even know where to begin with that task.
 

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i personally only use panther martins and typically don't target small streams. i always fish upstream. I look at runs and read the banking of the streams and the way the sun is and attack the sunless lays for the alpha or large trout in the holes. I don't spend much time on a hole. If i drag a couple through the hole, the bigs have been alerted and will more than likely have lock jaw then. I never use tiny spinners.
 

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After trying many spinners over the years I have narrowed it to two. I make my own spinners but one is an almost exact imitation of a #1 CP Swing using a silver blade. The other is the White Gold Bead Spinner used by Frank and others. By having one spinner with a silver blade and one with a gold blade I feel I'm ready for whatever preference the trout have on a particular day. I think those two spinners can outfish any other spinners on the market over the long term. I have become a convert to fishing them upstream. After downstream fishing for years I noticed my catch increased dramatically since fishing them upstream. I occasionally have a day with 30+ trout on spinners at a stocked stream but that is not the norm. A double digit day is usually easy to achieve though.
 

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When fishing upstream with spinners, don't you have to retrieve fast to keep from getting snagged? I never used spinners for wild trout because some streams I fish are so small, I have trouble figuring out how to fish them with a lure?
 

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To fish small or shallow streams upstream with spinners, you need to use an underhand flip cast and begin reeling as soon as the spinner hits the water. You will get snagged occasionally but not nearly as much as if you use an overhead cast.

Yes, you may have to retrieve quickly, but don't worry about the trout not being able to catch it. If they want it bad enough, they'll get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So so I understand. When fishing upstream, do you cast upstreama and retrieve quickly with the current?

Does anyone on here make and sell the homemade three bead spinners or could some provide some direction to what materials and sizes are needed to make my own?

Thanks again nomad.
 

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Yes, you retrieve with the current. The people that make their own spinners will have to answer your other question.
 

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When fishing upstream you must retrieve quickly because the blade won't spin properly otherwise. If you choose to try the spinner Frank uses he lists the materials needed in several posts. To make the traditional #1 CP Swing spinner design you need .026 3" closed loop wire shafts, hollow brass beads in size 1/8 and 5/32, wire clevises (brass) size 1, french blades (brass or nickel) size 1 and treble hook size 10. After putting the blade and clevis on shaft add a 1/8 bead followed by 3 5/32 beads followed by another 1/8 bead. Make loop for hook, fasten hook, trim excess wire and you are done.
 

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troutdoorsman said:
Trout magnets are an easy jump from bait fishing since you can fish them the same way by basically drifting and jigging them
I found it is much harder to be a beginner with trout magnets and consistent catch fish as opposed to being a beginner with spinners. Trout magnets are tough to fish. They require a very specific retrieve to be very effective. Spinners you can steady retrieve and catch fish all day.
 

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Lots of good info here. Thank you for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Trout180 said:
When fishing upstream you must retrieve quickly because the blade won't spin properly otherwise. If you choose to try the spinner Frank uses he lists the materials needed in several posts. To make the traditional #1 CP Swing spinner design you need .026 3" closed loop wire shafts, hollow brass beads in size 1/8 and 5/32, wire clevises (brass) size 1, french blades (brass or nickel) size 1 and treble hook size 10. After putting the blade and clevis on shaft add a 1/8 bead followed by 3 5/32 beads followed by another 1/8 bead. Make loop for hook, fasten hook, trim excess wire and you are done.
Thank you. I cant seem to find any of Franks posts for the materials needed. Maybe I am not looking in the right places. Any help would be appreciated. Also where is a good place to pick up these components?
 

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nomad_archer said:
I think the big thing here is I need to find wild trout waters. I don't even know where to begin with that task.
I think the most important thing I learned when I started fishing spinners back in 1979 is that all trout don't come from white trucks.

Sure, I knew that some streams in north-central PA had native brookies, but finding out that almost all non-stocked streams in the south-central area where I lived held wild brown trout was critical to know.

Go to the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission's website and do a search on "Class A Wild Trout Streams." You'll be amazed.
 
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