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Discussion Starter #1
September 1st kicks off ginseng digging season. I've been out checking out some spots but seems like it'll be a tough find this year.
A few years ago, I planted a couple of seeds under my deck and one hardy one continues to grow and produce seeds year after year.



 

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Nice!! I just saw an ad in Trapper & Predator Caller about buying Ginseng seeds I thought about buying some and planting some in my garden next year.
 

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Moss said:
Nice!! I just saw an ad in Trapper & Predator Caller about buying Ginseng seeds I thought about buying some and planting some in my garden next year.
I hope your garden is surrounded by trees Moss. This is a forest plant and does not tolerate much sun. That's why I planted the seeds under the deck, it only sees a little morning sunlight.
 

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I have found quite a few so far this year, i would check them once a week. I had to mark where there are now the deer ate all the leaves off and the seeds were knocked off. I went ahead and planted the seeds but cant wait until Sept.1 I have quite a few spots to check also before then. Good luck
 

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trapperrick said:
Moss said:
Nice!! I just saw an ad in Trapper & Predator Caller about buying Ginseng seeds I thought about buying some and planting some in my garden next year.
I hope your garden is surrounded by trees Moss. This is a forest plant and does not tolerate much sun. That's why I planted the seeds under the deck, it only sees a little morning sunlight.
Well then, I guess i'll plant some under my back porch
 

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nice. so in what type of PA forest habitat would these grow natively?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NorthPotter said:
nice. so in what type of PA forest habitat would these grow natively?
I tend to find them on hillsides with not so steep a grade and mostly around maple trees. I also find nice ones under wild grapevines as well.
 

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the ones i have found so far are around oak and poplar trees on flat ground and a little slope hillside but you really have to look hard as the deer seem to love the leaves on them and knock the berries off. like i said earlier i marked the ones i found so far so i can find them again in a few days
 

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I was hanging my lander stand yesterday and ran across one of these plants. Don't know much about them. What can you tell me? Thanks.
 

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Despite the hot, humid weather. I decided to look for root. I didn't find anything big enough to dig though.





This was the biggest one I found but left it alone.

 

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They have to be a 5 "prong" correct ? What is considered a "prong", a leave ?

Question. If you show a small group of folks how to look for Ginseng, would you be considered the "Lead Sanger" ?
 

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Fleroo said:
They have to be a 5 "prong" correct ? What is considered a "prong", a leave ?
The plant I took a picture of is a 3 prong plant which can be legally harvested in Pennsylvania. Below is from the DCNR website.

What is harvesting ginseng sustainably?

When you harvest ginseng you remove the root of the plant and therefore remove any potential for that plant to set seed and add new plants to that population. If all the plants in a population are removed and no seeds are allowed to set, then eventually there will not be any plants to harvest. In order to maintain a population so that plants can be harvested in subsequent years you need to choose carefully the plants you will harvest. PA regulations say that the plants must be 3 prongs of 5 leaftlets each (at least 5 years old) and the berries must be red when the seeds are planted in the vicinity of the harvested plant. You may not harvest until September 1 of the year. The plants generally will start producing seed about 5 years old, but taking all of the seed producing plants will also keep the population small and limit the number of roots that can be harvested. Take time to manage the population.
 

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I bought and planted over 100 seeds about 4 years ago. Only 14 of them germinated. They do not seem to get any size to the plants and now with the dry weather they are turning yellow. Maybe 3c area is not a good place for them to grow.
 

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On the side of a hill under popular trees is the best place to plant seeds.The ground needs to drain very well.This plant needs very little water.Allso the bigger the trees the better.This plant allso needs very little to no sun.
 
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