The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anybody go out "hunting sang" today? I was able to locate some.







I collect the seeds and spread them out in the same area. The couple of patches I found are all clustered together.
I only found about 6 or 7 harvestable roots but I'm sure there are more around.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,395 Posts
nice, healthy looking plants. maybe get out next weekend. the lady I go with hurt her leg and couldn't go. I go just for the sport of it and to get out. she digs a little and donates the money to the local church. we've been going to spots I dug 30 years ago and haven't been to since then and hit some of her favorite spots. makes for a fun day in the woods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,395 Posts
did well Saturday. got 27 nice roots in the 30-40 year old range. there was a lot there that we left. hope to get out once more while the berries are on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Nice job blackpowder! most of the roots that look harvestable are only around 12 to 16 years old. There were a lot of sangers around here at one time and those old fellas used to hit the plants hard. Most of those guys are gone or just too old to get out anymore and I've been doing my part to get the seed spread out to get a decent amount out there for future generations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Sweet pics. I mailny harvest morels, but when i worked in Greene and Washington County we used to take pics of the ginseng wef ound, never picked it tho cuz it was usually just a lonely plant or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,416 Posts
misfire1 said:
Nice pictures. How tall does the plant get? I've looked but never found any.
A good 4 or 5-pronger could be knee-high or so. But most is about a foot or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Wow. I didnt know what it looke dlike. I saw a pile of that stuff just this weekend touching up some deer stands. In fcat, on my property, there is a lot of that, I always thought it was just some weeds that grow in the woods. What is this stuff worth?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,279 Posts
There are 100's of those plants in a bottom I hunt. Look just like it. Ate their other plants that resemble it. Mine are in a wet area. Not a swamp but always moist.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,799 Posts
there are MANY plants that resemble it...even many plants with red berries...


ive read sang is one of the first plants to yellow in the woods...ive found that to be false so far (my first time ever looking for it) i found 2 patches so far here in Michigan..yesterday i found the 2nd patch...STEEP north facing slopes...hardwood forest...little to no light getting through the canopy..well drained soils..

i am FAR from a pro...

i dont know the tricks or what to actually look for...i would likely have NEVER found the 2 patches i did but i had maps...the maps atleast got me to the right hillsides...now i know what i know and am learning what it looks like..how it grows etc..


im interested in seeing if i can find any at home where i can actually dig it...might be too late not sure..will be home in a week or so...here in northern Michigan the patch i found yesterday was still green and still had its red berries...

most all the other stuff is yellowing which made it stand out actually...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,395 Posts
most likely, if there is "alot" of it, that's probably not what it is. places with a lot of plants are few and far between. not saying it not mind you, just unlikely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,575 Posts
good friend of my father is a house flipper....he bought a house 2 years ago that came with 11 acres...one of this guys friends from work asked to hunt his property and while scouting found an absolute gold mine....he told my dads buddy and ended up getting in touch with a big buyer....made about 10k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,395 Posts
my first patch, some 30+ years ago, was knee high 4 prongers as far as you could see through the under growth and grape vines. it was in a very unlikely area where there had been and old farm stead. all 50-75 year old roots and it was everywhere! we always figured some old timer had planted it there years ago and nobody in the area knew about it. it was right up to a mowed yard in the brush on one side and on the top of the bank at the road. too bad someone found it about 10 years later and wiped it out. sad, they dug everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Valkyrie said:
Wow. I didnt know what it looke dlike. I saw a pile of that stuff just this weekend touching up some deer stands. In fcat, on my property, there is a lot of that, I always thought it was just some weeds that grow in the woods. What is this stuff worth?
Wild root is going for about $500.00 to $600.00 a pound. DCNR does regulate it and they state what is considered harvestable root which is a 3 pronged plant with5 leaves on each prong. Also, the seeds have to be dispersed and planted in the same general area where the root was harvested.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
Be advised, wild sarsprilla looks a lot like sang and there is a lot more of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,416 Posts
John S said:
Be advised, wild sarsprilla looks a lot like sang and there is a lot more of it.
That would be what 'sengers call "fool's seng".

It's really pretty easy to tell the difference between fool's and real.

Fool's doesn't get a central berry pod.

Fool's generally stands twice as tall as the real thing.

Fool's has 5 leaves per stem and ginseng has 5 leaves per stem. But ginseng's leaves all radiate from the end of the stem where Fool's only radiates 3 leaves from the end and 2 from a bit farther down the stem.

Hickory sprouts, Virginia creeper, some of the cinquefoils and even some young briar shoots can give the appearance of ginseng to a novice. But see the real thing just once and it becomes pretty apparent pretty quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Strut10 said:
John S said:
Be advised, wild sarsprilla looks a lot like sang and there is a lot more of it.
That would be what 'sengers call "fool's seng".

It's really pretty easy to tell the difference between fool's and real.

Fool's doesn't get a central berry pod.

Fool's generally stands twice as tall as the real thing.

Fool's has 5 leaves per stem and ginseng has 5 leaves per stem. But ginseng's leaves all radiate from the end of the stem where Fool's only radiates 3 leaves from the end and 2 from a bit farther down the stem.

Hickory sprouts, Virginia creeper, some of the cinquefoils and even some young briar shoots can give the appearance of ginseng to a novice. But see the real thing just once and it becomes pretty apparent pretty quickly.
Yes, it's amazing to walk through the woods and see lots of ginseng looking leaves but 90% of the time it" not sang. I read a couple of posts from guys saying they found lots of it by a swampy area. Chances are they didn't find ginseng. Ginseng prefers loamy soil on hardwood groves and ridges. I'll find some by grapevines because the birds eat the seeds and "plant" them where they roost.

To answer your question mossycamo, no, you do not need a permit to harvest. Not yet anyhow, I can see that coming though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
watchin Hillbilly blood last night. show was about Eugene needed a 1/2 lb. of seng for a down payment on a truck. well to make a long story short, Spencer had seng on his propeerty and going to give some to Eugene. on their hunt there was a pocher taking Spencers seng and they caught up with the poacher. here the poacher had a bloodhound trained to sniff out seng. now the poacher is a regular on the show. but I thought it was interesting to have a dog sniffing seng out. I guess it would be like training the dog for drugs.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top