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Discussion Starter #1
since my first thread got high jacked...

so i bought an inline... it doesn't come with anything but the gun and a sling... what other items do i need to get started? Obviously powder, primer bullet....
 

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Here's some load/bullet info:

I've owned 2 CVA's over the years with that 1-28 twist Spanish-made Bergara barrel. I found the 348 grain Powerbelt Aerotips stabilze very nicely pushed by approx 100 grains 2fg T7 or 2 50 grain T7 pellets. I suggest working up loads starting below 100 grains(if loose) in woking up to the optimum load. Many go with the more readily avaible 250 grainers which Ive shot also. The 348's group a little better & I found their performance on deer to be outstanding.

If you want to use black powder & not a substitute...I suggest getting some Swiss 3fg and start at 70 grains & work up. Swiss is a hotter powder(but cleaner) but if you really get into refining loads...its the absolute best you can get IMO. Very consistent granulation. I shoot it exclusively in my White Rifle Custom Super 91 .504 caliber. Its the choice of match black powder shooters. My TC pro Hunter seems to faver 2 T7 Magum pellets(=approx 120 grains 2F) and the TC Shockwave(Bonded) 250 grainers.

Each ML is differnt in what they seem to like. One thing to keep in mind though is that those max loads in your manual are rarely ever needed. Likely 150 grains is listed. Read manual "cover to cover" and then some if your new to the sport. CVA always had good safety manuals.

Hey...best of luck & look forward to your reports!!
 

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Of course a ball/bullet starter. I assume you get a ram rod (Although two of my inlines came without ramrods and have no provisions to hold a ram rod)

will you be shooting loose powder or pellets(expensive) If loose powder, you will need a powder container(flask or speedloaders) and a powder measure, preferrably adjustable.

Whatever primers the gun takes, and cleaning equipment. If the ram rod doesn't have a proper jag for cleaning you will need one (Watch the threads, there are four or five diffferent threads for jags, get one thazt fits the ram rod). Lots of cleaning patches. Some bore cleaner of somekind. whether you use hot soapy water or a commercial cleaner

Tools to clear the gun when you accidentally dry ball. (ram a bullet in and forget the powder) A gun grade screwdriver, pliers, etc. Many guys prefer to have a range rod for loading and cleaning. The rods that come with the guns are almost always too short for range work. You may already have a stoudt cleaning rod for other rifles and shot guns. (again watch the threads for the jag. )

Perhaps a small vial of alcohol to clean the oil from the gun before loading.

There is the list of essentials (starter, powder containers, cleaning jag) and the list of really handy to haves (extra rod, gun screw driver, tackle box to hold supplies to and from the range, and lastly the one in three years useful things that may be nice to have. You can easily get by with 30 bucks worth of new accessories, but the gun shop clerk can easily sell you $200 bucks worth of accessories, expensive lubes, expensive bore cleaners etc.

Just as a word of advice. until you are accustomed to loading and shooting a muzzie, keep your powder loads moderate. say about a 70 grain or 80 grain load. That load is more than enough to kill ANYTHING in PA, except maybe in a zoo. Manufacturers give lists of loads. The max is usually less accurate and certainly more recoil punishing than a reasonable hunting load.

And for God's sake, don't exceed the max load. Some folks get the really strange idea that if some powder is good, more is better. More powder can be dangerous. Heqavy recoil usually leads to flinching and that leads to missed shots. Frankly, 1870's Buff hunters out west made one shot kils at 400 yards with 70 to 90 grains of powder and 50 caliber bullets. Also, more pwder doesn't really extend range with a light bullet. Air resistance and short bullet length will cause most in-line bullets to start losing stability past 150 yards. Reducing the powder and using a longer bullet extends range more effectively (Yeah I know, it sounds backwards) For instance with 65 grains of powder and a 500 grain bullet, I can knock down steel rams at 500 meters. Most 50 cal in=line bullets can't maintain stability that far. So for all the fancy pellets and expensive composite felt/plastic bushed bullets, they, for the most part, just don't have the same range, as a longer heavier bullet launched by less powder.
 

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Awesome! I had to do a search to figure out what the rifle was that you bought. CVA Accura is a fantastic rifle!

Range Rod is very important, CVA sells one for a great price at only around $28.

Powder tubes for loose powder * best way to go*

Powder: Blackhorn209 without a doubt!
Primers: CCI 209M
Bullets: 245-295-300-338gr Powerbelts shoot great in my Accura as well as the 250gr slick load sabots. 250gr and 300gr Thor conicals shoot great as well. Its a very good rifle with many projectiles.

cleaning supplies: with blackhorn209 you need an oil based cleaner and Butches bore shine is a great product for this powder.

when i get home i can PM you and help you out with more info
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the pointers guys! soon as i get back from work trip i hope to get to the range with it!
 

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You have, and will get lots of good recommendations. Knowing what to get and use is easy. The hard part is putting it all together.

The best advice I can give you is consistency. Consistency is key in shooting an MZ.

Constant pressure is the key to accuracy. So you want to load your rifle to give the same pressure every time.

Pressure=Volume X Energy. Since you know you can control the energy by the amount of powder you use. Then the hardest thing to control is volume.

A range rod is very important for this. Also buy a drill stop. I am assuming you know what a drill stop is. Buy the stop with the same diameter as your range rod. When you load your bullet take the drill stop and adjust it on the rod so that the drill stop stops the rod from pushing the bullet any farther into the barrel. What you are trying to avoid is compressed loads. Then your next bullet you load wil be seated in the exact same place as the last, because the drill stop will stop the range rod from setting the bullet any deeper.

This is a very easy, simple, and cheap way to keep your pressure consistent. And with consistent pressure you will have good groups, provided you do your part. Tom.
 
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