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When I was young, I would lay in bed and dream of the bucks I would harvest. Now that I am old, I sit in my chair and daydream about the bucks I harvested.

I am 71 now. Started hunting in 1966. The mountains are too high and the trails too steep for me now. The fire has gone out, so I don't burn with the desire to hunt anymore. I would rather spend time with my three year old granddaughter.
 

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Ravin R9
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When I was young, I would lay in bed and dream of the bucks I would harvest. Now that I am old, I sit in my chair and daydream about the bucks I harvested.

I am 71 now. Started hunting in 1966. The mountains are too high and the trails too steep for me now. The fire has gone out, so I don't burn with the desire to hunt anymore. I would rather spend time with my three year old granddaughter.
Find some flatland and get that Granddaughter out into the wilds at a slow pace. Best of both worlds?
 

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I imagine the shape your in at 60 could be a direct result of what you did when you were younger...either good or bad.

I was listening to a interview of a man who had turned 104...when they asked him about his secret to good health he said... "Whiskey and bacon"...lol

When I was 16 I started doing pushups and sit ups every night, every week id try for a few more...got to the point where I did 100 every night, as I got older I slacked off to 75.

Doing masonry all my life got hard on my joints, so I quit doing so many pushups because it made my joints click. I started using lower weights on a bench which for some reason don't do that.. So now I use 50 lbs and just do 85 bench press reps...and I hold a 25 lb weight behind my neck and lower the bench so it slopes to the floor and do 25 sit ups...seems ok.

Last year I packed my buck out...pack, treestand , meat, head and rack. ...not sure what it weighed, but the last mt up over, was steep enough that id tip over if i stood up straight...knocking on 57 here in a month...glad I took care of myself when I was younger.
 

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I have the opposite problem. I am 51 and can no longer do it mentally. Physically, I'm in my best shape since my 20s. I just don't have the fire inside anymore. 3 years ago, my wife died. Ever since, I don't have the fire in my belly to do much. I definitely can't sit alone in the woods for very long. My mind just goes too many places. I had the opporunity to shoot a doe last year and just didn't feel like it.

I still love hiking, planting food plots, checking trail cams, etc....I can't do the solo part of hunting anymore. The sitting in the woods, all alone. And I don't care anymore whether I get a deer or not. I hope I snap out of it. In the meantime, buck camp is coming up. I will enjoy the time at camp with my buddies. I'll head out for a few walks with the rifle. But I think I'll enjoy the time at the cabin more.
 

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I am just days away from 58, with a knee that acts up. I notice I feel the cold and struggle with the 4:30 AM alarm more and more.

I am fortunate to have a real good archery spot, but no gun hunting on the property. So right now for me it's "go big or go home" in bow season. This year I let a nice basket 7pt pass by, and I thought to myself that it probably won't be too many more years that I will do that.

I actually whispered to myself out loud, "Not yet my man, not yet......"
 

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I’ll be 75 this December 15th. I was able to retire at age 60, and I’m glad I did, the past 15 years have passed quickly.
I hunted hard until my mid / late 60’s, then my age started catching up with me. The mountains i once climbed in 20 minutes now take an hour, if I climb them at all. I now stay on the flats as much as I can, but still hunt. I will say I have become a much better still hunter since I’ve grown old though , because of the simple fact, I no longer can move as fast as I once did. You may need to change tactic, but that may not be a bad thing.
 

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... I just don't have the fire inside anymore...
So sorry to hear about your loss, you are awfully young to have had to go through loosing your sole mate.

I lost my first wife in middle age, and even though we had been divorced for awhile (but still friendly), the range of emotions was hard to deal with. Guess I had put off dealing with our failed marriage but her untimely death brought out unreconciled emotions, so many questions. Memories of the good times and the bad times (and we sure had our share of both). What could I have done to be a better spouse and person? It really changed me, I like to think for the better, I'm a much more tolerant person than I was as a younger man.

Three years is the blink of an eye, you are still grieving. I hope time will heal some of the wounds and you find peace.

I'm in the same place with the hunting fire inside, but with me it's physical and to a lesser extent age related. Once I get out the old fire comes back to some extent, but it's very hard to get motivated.
 

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So sorry to hear about your loss, you are awfully young to have had to go through loosing your sole mate.

I lost my first wife in middle age, and even though we had been divorced for awhile (but still friendly), the range of emotions was hard to deal with. Guess I had put off dealing with our failed marriage but her untimely death brought out unreconciled emotions, so many questions. Memories of the good times and the bad times (and we sure had our share of both). What could I have done to be a better spouse and person? It really changed me, I like to think for the better, I'm a much more tolerant person than I was as a younger man.

Three years is the blink of an eye, you are still grieving. I hope time will heal some of the wounds and you find peace.

I'm in the same place with the hunting fire inside, but with me it's physical and to a lesser extent age related. Once I get out the old fire comes back to some extent, but it's very hard to get motivated.
Thanks. You totally get it. It's weird. I don't feel like I'm grieving anymore, but I guess I am. It's just different. The empty feeling, the purpose in life....there's so many moments where I'm like, "I don't feel like doing that" or "I'll do it tomorrow". My kids were freshman and sophomores in HS, so I had to buck up and keep it together for them. Now my son is off in college and my daughter is a senior. I have those moments to reflect. I think I'll get back into hunting like I used to. Been hung-ho since I was 12. Right now, it's just not what it used to be. I gotta find that inner peace and happiness, and then the rest will come back. Working on phase two of my life. I was married for 20 years.

The silver lining is, 50 year old women are WILD!!!!! :)
 

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Ravin R9
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So sorry to hear about your loss, you are awfully young to have had to go through loosing your sole mate.

I lost my first wife in middle age, and even though we had been divorced for awhile (but still friendly), the range of emotions was hard to deal with. Guess I had put off dealing with our failed marriage but her untimely death brought out unreconciled emotions, so many questions. Memories of the good times and the bad times (and we sure had our share of both). What could I have done to be a better spouse and person? It really changed me, I like to think for the better, I'm a much more tolerant person than I was as a younger man.

Three years is the blink of an eye, you are still grieving. I hope time will heal some of the wounds and you find peace.

I'm in the same place with the hunting fire inside, but with me it's physical and to a lesser extent age related. Once I get out the old fire comes back to some extent, but it's very hard to get motivated.
Quite a Special and Moving post loridr (y) (y) (y)
 

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At 53, I feel like a youngster on here. I am thankful to be able bodied and physically strong still. My problem is that I’m losing my interest in still hunting here in PA. I enjoy out west and other states greatly still. But PA just isn’t cutting it for me anymore. I hunted a bit in archery, but for the first time in my life, I didn’t even set foot in the woods in fall turkey or bear season. If it weren’t for taking out my dad and son, I don’t know if I’d even still hunt here.
How do you guys maintain your motivation?
Trying to perfect the still hunt. One more mature buck in the Sproul.
 

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Thanks guys.
I'll tell ya what. There are very few people that I feel I could sit down with and have a meaningful (and helpful) conversation with. You get a lot of the platitudes, but people don't really understand. They can't. You would be one of those few people. I could tell that from that one post :)

Actually, my brother-in-law said it best. We were talking about stuff.....maybe 3 months after her death. I said something like, "you know how it is".....or something like that. He came back and said no, no he doesn't know how it is. It was simple, yet profound. He admitted that it's impossible to really know one's experience unless you've lived it.

Again, thank you for the kind and wise words, loridr. :) I hope you have the same peace in your heart that I am working towards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Some people i know in the BEST of shape died in the 50's and early 60's.Know of some who were over weight in their 50's and 60's that are now in the 80's.I don't think we always control that clock when we are handed it at birth.We just gotta live for today because tomorrow is not a guarantee !
 

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410-er, I want to thank you for initiating this thread. An hour or so ago, I thought I'd read a couple of responses, being one of the "getting older" set, and now here I am having finished reading all the responses, and now feel compelled to offer my own.

I'll turn 79 in March, and hunting has been an important part of those years, beginning as a squirrel retriever for my dad when six years old. His Iver/Johnson, 16 gauge, single shot could whack bushy tails from the highest branches of most any shell bark hickory or beech tree. The smell of those empty, paper shotgun shells, helped instill that love of hunting over and through those hills and hollows of West Virginia.

My hunting took a severe hit when at 15 in 1959, dad and I moved to Pennsylvania. His new job ended his hunting, my huge new high school temporarily ended mine, but a used, 12 gauge, Ithaca double barrel, made my 16th. birthday really special and a desire to try Pennsylvania's hills and hollows began to grow in earnest That desire has remained to this day. The hunting partners have mostly passed, my son has lost his enthusiasm for hunting, my grandson has moved south for employment, and I find myself now hunting less and mostly alone.

I will continue to hunt. I enjoy building flintlocks and hunting the early season and after Christmas. The crossbow has allowed me to again participate in the archery season. Physical changes have me hunting nearer the truck, but even that change was challenged in early November when a fine, heavy, 10 pointer walked past my spot at 15 yards! Getting that fellow back to the truck may require looking into the plastic sled idea suggested here earlier!

Best of luck to all of you seasoned nimrods. Be safe. Aim small to miss small, and best wishes for many more years in the woods.

.
 

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410-er, I want to thank you for initiating this thread. An hour or so ago, I thought I'd read a couple of responses, being one of the "getting older" set, and now here I am having finished reading all the responses, and now feel compelled to offer my own.

I'll turn 79 in March, and hunting has been an important part of those years, beginning as a squirrel retriever for my dad when six years old. His Iver/Johnson, 16 gauge, single shot could whack bushy tails from the highest branches of most any shell bark hickory or beech tree. The smell of those empty, paper shotgun shells, helped instill that love of hunting over and through those hills and hollows of West Virginia.

My hunting took a severe hit when at 15 in 1959, dad and I moved to Pennsylvania. His new job ended his hunting, my huge new high school temporarily ended mine, but a used, 12 gauge, Ithaca double barrel, made my 16th. birthday really special and a desire to try Pennsylvania's hills and hollows began to grow in earnest That desire has remained to this day. The hunting partners have mostly passed, my son has lost his enthusiasm for hunting, my grandson has moved south for employment, and I find myself now hunting less and mostly alone.

I will continue to hunt. I enjoy building flintlocks and hunting the early season and after Christmas. The crossbow has allowed me to again participate in the archery season. Physical changes have me hunting nearer the truck, but even that change was challenged in early November when a fine, heavy, 10 pointer walked past my spot at 15 yards! Getting that fellow back to the truck may require looking into the plastic sled idea suggested here earlier!

Best of luck to all of you seasoned nimrods. Be safe. Aim small to miss small, and best wishes for many more years in the woods.

.
Fantastic post.
 

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At 53, I feel like a youngster on here. I am thankful to be able bodied and physically strong still. My problem is that I’m losing my interest in still hunting here in PA. I enjoy out west and other states greatly still. But PA just isn’t cutting it for me anymore. I hunted a bit in archery, but for the first time in my life, I didn’t even set foot in the woods in fall turkey or bear season. If it weren’t for taking out my dad and son, I don’t know if I’d even still hunt here.
How do you guys maintain your motivation?
Maybe step out of your comfort zone. Move to public land, limit yourself to one buck, etc…

cheaper than moving out west.
 
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