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Ravin R9
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I'm going on 66 and still going for the most part. Those southern Potter Co. mountains and bitter cold have become a challenge for me.
Both knees replaced , have 16 screws and plate in hip from an auto accident along with a bad back and arthritis.
I get monthly injections in my abdomen for the Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Can't really complain still can do most of the outdoor activities I like.
My advice to the youngins is the better ya take care of your body now the better your body will feel down the road when aging.
My biggest nemesis is the cigarettes. Hook line and sinker.
 

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I’m pushing *65, hunting 3 sometimes 4 states a year is wearing e down, there’s no more off season. I have a old freighter pack frame that I have a #50 bag of play sand on, I went 2.5 miles this morning. It gets harder every year, but I keep telling myself I’m still 30 years old. One of these days my body is going to find out Im lying lol.
 

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At 53, I feel like a youngster on here. I am thankful to be able bodied and physically strong still. My problem is that I’m losing my interest in still hunting here in PA. I enjoy out west and other states greatly still. But PA just isn’t cutting it for me anymore. I hunted a bit in archery, but for the first time in my life, I didn’t even set foot in the woods in fall turkey or bear season. If it weren’t for taking out my dad and son, I don’t know if I’d even still hunt here.
How do you guys maintain your motivation?
 

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Ravin R9
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I guess visions of a monster Buck keeps me motivated. In my younger days I always dreamed of going out west for Elk but couldn't afford it.
Putting 2 kids thru Catholic school wasn't cheap.
Not sure if I'd be up for the task now and also lost my desire to do it. Would rather go out west to Trout fish.
One thing I'll admit is getting up at 4 am 2 or 3 days in a row to hunt is becoming less desirable. :D
 

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At 53, I feel like a youngster on here. I am thankful to be able bodied and physically strong still. My problem is that I’m losing my interest in still hunting here in PA. I enjoy out west and other states greatly still. But PA just isn’t cutting it for me anymore. I hunted a bit in archery, but for the first time in my life, I didn’t even set foot in the woods in fall turkey or bear season. If it weren’t for taking out my dad and son, I don’t know if I’d even still hunt here.
How do you guys maintain your motivation?
i think you either have it, or you don’t.

I also find I enjoy the activities around hunting as much as the actual hunt. Shooting the bow out in the yard, taking a “scouting” walk in the woods.

Hunting also strengthens the bond with my son who is still at the “full bore” stage.
 

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At 69 going on 70 in February I'm like most of you fellas here, stoved up with arthritis and other problems but we keep going doing what we love, rather it's hearing that old hound bellow out a pretty tune chasing a rabbit, grouse or pheasant or sitting in a deer stand waiting for that big buck we seen early in the season, we keep doing what we love because we can and will as long as we have legs that move, lungs that breath and a way to get our game home. I don't plan on giving up any time soon, not as long as the good Lord allows me a little strength to get in the woods and give him thanks for all the years I been blessed with some of the best times of my life.
 

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I am just two months shy of hitting the 72 years old mark and I feel like I am still going pretty strong for a man my age and past physical abuse. I spent my youth and Army days being pretty abuse to my body then spent the first twenty five years of my career not only participating but teaching law enforcement defensive tactics. I gave up the teaching of it when I hit age 60 but still had to do the annual training until I retired. Some of it involved a lot of throws, body twisting and falls so it was kind of brutal and hard on the body at times.

Until I reached age 60 I felt like I could still do just about anything I wanted to do. From age 60 - 70 I was noticing that old age was creeping up on me but I could still hike the steep hills, though not as fast as I once did, could cover 6-8 miles in a day chasing grouse or pheasants behind my bird dog and thought nothing of killing a deer a couple miles from the truck and either dragging or carting it out.

Though all of my joints and other parts are still the originals I was born with I have noticed the past over the past two years that each year now I get slower and less able. Now I struggle with just a few hours and two or three miles of pushing through the high grass and bracken fields hunting pheasants. Now all of the high grass and weeds seem to do their best, and too frequently succeed, to tie my feet up, trip me up and cause me to continue practicing those old falling techniques I used to teach.

This getting old is certainly not for the weak of heart or mind. For the first time in my life I am starting to tell my hunting companions that I am just getting too old for this lifestyle I am still trying to live.

I have no real serious regrets about most of my life or the abuses I have delivered to my body though. I have lived a full and mostly good life and still enjoy pretty good health and mobility, compared to many others my age. There are some things I would change if I could, mostly things where others ended up getting hurt and some even killed. But for the most part I have had a good run on life.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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Dad often said gettin' old ain't for sissies, when he was about the age I am now. He was right. :)

Spent most of my working life having to be there at 7. That changed when I started working for myself. Not in much of a hurry to get up these days, except for deer season. When my gal still hunted, she asked my buddy the first doe season she came to camp, HTH I got up at 4:30 with no alarm clock. Buddy told her I'd been doing that at camp for as long as he could remember, if it was an opening day.

Gotta have your priorities in order.
 

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Ah, yes. Tripping on rocks and roots. The cousin that lives across the valley from camp and looks after the place, is six months younger than me. Retired dairy farmer, had to give that up after having both hips replaced. He gets around better than I do. Not quite as frisky as he once was, after having a mild stroke a few years ago.

Couple years ago I commented to him that we were almost through the first week of rifle season and I hadn't taken a tumble yet. Several inches of snow on the ground to that point. So he says he'd noted that I hadn't left any of the trails yet, either. He doesn't say much, but when he does it's usually right on point.

:p

Helped the BIL get his big doe out last year. Him pulling his deer cart, me pushing. Couldn't see what I was stepping on, so tortured my achy ankles and knees on a zillion rocks and roots over several hundred yards in the woods.

Told him that ain't happening again. This year he has a roll up plastic sled, said I can help him pull. Ain't happening.
Don’t knock those rolled up plastic sleds until you tried one Denny. They will run over you going down hill if the leaves are wet, and especially with snow. Ain’t to shabby on dry ground either.
 

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"Don’t knock those rolled up plastic sleds until you tried one Denny. They will run over you going down hill if the leaves are wet, and especially with snow. Ain’t to shabby on dry ground either."

I usually retrieve deer with the camp tractor or the camp jalopy, on my own ground. Not many places I can't get to with either one and maybe a short drag to 'em? Even better if I get one within a few hundred yards of camp, which happens fairly often. We'll see how the BIL's new sled works this year I reckon?

Been run over a few times dragging deer. My first buck was uphill from camp and there was a frozen crust on the snow. Buck knocked me down several times dragging it. Last tug down to camp was easy. Just had to pull it out from behind the trees it got stuck on and let 'er rip again.

:)

Another buck was over a half mile from camp, so decided to take it down into the next valley behind camp. Deep snow, easy drag, if I don't count getting rolled in the snow by the dead buck several times on the trip down. Dead deer's revenge. Called one of the local farmers on the radio, they came and got me.
 

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Don’t knock those rolled up plastic sleds until you tried one Denny. They will run over you going down hill if the leaves are wet, and especially with snow. Ain’t to shabby on dry ground either.
I agree, I have a rollup Ive used several times. However, at camp we keep a pink kids plastic sled big enough for a buck. My neices outgrew the sled and it was free. Added a longer tow rope and i want to drill a few holes along the side lip to lash the deer in.
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