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I just turned 67 November 4th. After having both knees replaced and a dislocated shoulder from a fall in spring turkey season I feel very fortunate to still be able to do what I love. Have slowed down and can not climb the hills like I used to. I was still able to get 25 days for archery and spend quality time in the woods feel very blessed and hope to be able to go on for a few more years.
 

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Started hunting alone at 8 years old to help feed the family. missed time hunting the 4 years in the military except some time on leave. It has been a great journey thus far...with a few hitches like a fall from a tree requiring a piece of titanium and 8 screws...I did save the cat thought, triceps reattachments on both arms, but only missed a few days of hunting season thanks to crossbows, Oh and there was that quadruple bi-pass 16 years ago, but I was well enough by hunting season to drag out a nice Ohio 8 point.

I travelled most of my career to different states, met a lot of hunters and had the opportunity to share several camps. I hunted everyday I could and in a few different states. Turned down the opportunity to be best man in a wedding of one of my best friends as it was on a hunting day. One my wedding day my brother -in-law and I wore our tux while shooting doves. I think the only formal hunt I was ever on.

Now at 76 I erected 5 ladders stands, made mock scrapes, cut shooting lanes, ran 14 T cams for 4 months and hunted everyday I could hunt alone. Turkey, deer and coyote at night. I am fortunate to have more acres available to me than I can cover with 4 wheel access.

It was a rough year this season as during archery I had to take quality time off a few days to work on the gas furnace, cut wood for the wood furnace and finally have a new gas furnace installed, also the refrigerator failed and had to take time off to replace it and the washer and the dryers replacement shopping and installation day during the season.

Back to the gym after Christmas as I missed the last two years and I look forward to working out hoping it and my two excellent doctors can keep me going for a few more seasons. Have 2 ladder stands to relocate and two more to install by myself.

Thanks to my wonderful wife who has tolerates my hunting habits for 32 years now.

My best wishes to all take care of yourselves, your family and hunt safe.
[/QUOT thanks! and to you also(y)
 

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And here I thought it was just me getting older….

When the sun comes up, and it’s time to go, the years melt away and I trick my body into gear. I pay for it when the sun goes down. In my head, I’m still 30 years old. Eating Ibuprofen tonight.

Mrs Brownie thinks I’m nuts.
Is she right about ya?
 

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I never thought about working out as my job is a workout every day. But after doing some PT and seeing some of those old guys at the gym next to where i did my PT, i'm thinking i might try some cardio and try to get the strength back in my leg. And keep gradually increasing my draw weight on my bow, 50# is getting easier every day, i'm going to try to be back at 60# before spring, i have a bear hunt scheduled in Saskatchewan in May. Wilderness hunt with lots of long walks to the baits.
 

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I'll be 61 here in a few months and wonder how much longer I can hunt at the level I do, father time waits for no one. Hunting Montana this past fall sleeping on the ground in a tent for 10 days and all the walking with a heavy pack was tough. The day my son shot his elk I packed an 80 pound elk quarter up a mountain and it felt like my hip bones were going to blow out the sockets. I work out hard lifting weights 3 or 4 times a week and do a lot of hiking and running. I had shoulder surgery a couple years ago and it was hard to get back to pulling 60 pounds and can't shoot as many arrows as I used to. The one thing I have noticed there seems to be a lot more stuff in the woods to trip on now than when I was younger. Good luck to all the seasoned hunters out there still giving it a go.
 

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The day my son shot his elk I packed an 80 pound elk quarter up a mountain and it felt like my hip bones were going to blow out the sockets.

The one thing I have noticed there seems to be a lot more stuff in the woods to trip on now than when I was younger.
I turned 50 while on an elk hunt in Utah. By day three, I could barely walk. Right hip. Luckily I had tagged out on a deer and elk. I never had any problem with it before then. Four years later, I got it replaced. Then in 2012, the left one was replaced.

Docs told me the tripping in the woods is because I’m not fully picking up my feet anymore.
 

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Ah, yes. Tripping on rocks and roots. The cousin that lives across the valley from camp and looks after the place, is six months younger than me. Retired dairy farmer, had to give that up after having both hips replaced. He gets around better than I do. Not quite as frisky as he once was, after having a mild stroke a few years ago.

Couple years ago I commented to him that we were almost through the first week of rifle season and I hadn't taken a tumble yet. Several inches of snow on the ground to that point. So he says he'd noted that I hadn't left any of the trails yet, either. He doesn't say much, but when he does it's usually right on point.

:p

Helped the BIL get his big doe out last year. Him pulling his deer cart, me pushing. Couldn't see what I was stepping on, so tortured my achy ankles and knees on a zillion rocks and roots over several hundred yards in the woods.

Told him that ain't happening again. This year he has a roll up plastic sled, said I can help him pull. Ain't happening.
 

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Debating on when the appropriate time is to start the conversation on quitting smoking with the wife is. After rifle season seems like a good starting point… She’s been an on/off smoker for 15 years. Her grandmother died of lung cancer at 57. These conversations never go well…
I quit smoking when I wanted a new shotgun and my wife told me to buy it with my cigarette money. With smokes being 8 bucks a pack I could buy a really nice rifle. Still quitting is hard to do.
 

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I am 46 and will stop complaining that i am old, after reading all the above posts. :ROFLMAO:

Yesterday, i was working on my ATV all day. Winter is coming so i wanted to install snowplow on the ATV (its a new ATV). I started doing it myself instead of taking it to a dealer. I got all the parts, It's a warn front mounted, driven by winch. I mounted the winch, then got stuck with the wiring, i knew i had to splice the ignition wire to connect one of the wires, i figured out everything except that. I was a bit afraid to screw it up. So i walked to my neighbor who is a semi-retired old timer (70+) and a fellow hunter, asked for help. He comes over, quickly helps me with the wiring and leaves. Rest i can do it myself. I realized, this DIY culture is dying with this generation :( , lucky to atleast learn a thing or two.
 

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For someone who never thought I would live to see my 21st birthday I have been extremely lucky. I am 70 and only thing I take medicine wise is 1 81 gr aspirin and Claritin for seasonal allergies a day.
I try not to dwell on what is harder to do anymore but try to focus more on what I still can do. It is frustrating to know I cant sprint up the mountain or work I use to be able to knock out in 20 minutes might take me twice as long or longer but the key is keep plugging along.
All of the original group I started hunting with have passed but you make new acquaintances and new experiences.
I still have a group I hunt mostly with but will hunt alone if that's my only option.
Not as much into the small game anymore but hunt ducks and geese when the season permits. Still get out for bear and archery(crossbow) and rifle hunt deer. I just now would ask for someone to help drag a deer out if I have a long drag.
If the time comes where I need motorized assistance that's what I am going to do, where there is a will there is a way.
Like our ages hunting has changed over time and the end result is still the same its just the methods we use that's different.
Enjoy it as long as your able and the memories of past hunts might be all you need to give it another try.
Good Luck
 
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