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In the June issue , on page 12, the picture of that log pile, how in the world did they stack those logs that high????
 

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I don't have the picture at hand, nor have I seen it....but I'm betting with ramps, block and tackle. You can accomplish a lot with those simple tools.

Archimedes moved a fully loaded ship on dry land using such devices, all by himself.
 

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My Grandfather worked the logging camps in northern Centre Counties in the 1920s. The big logging floats on the West Branch were over, as were the splash dams. He had a good working knowledge of both, as his father had worked in those eras. He was in on the tail end of the narrow gage railroading. He worked the Spruce Run area, logs were cabled across thee West Branch to Coleman’s Siding to be milled.

He mined coal from October to March, ( the mines dried out in the winter, and there was more demand for coal), and worked the logging camps in late spring and summer. Even though the mines were low, and everything was done by hand...he much preferred mining to logging. Although most would think working underground to be dangerous, there were a lot more accidents in the woods than in the mines.
 

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In the June issue , on page 12, the picture of that log pile, how in the world did they stack those logs that high????

Not only "how" but "why"? There was a lot of muscle necessary to stack that pile

There does seem to be a rail in the foreground and I wonder if the pile was stacked that way to load flat cars.
 

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Very interesting and always like hearing about that era of time. If you ever get near Galeton, Pa off route 6. They have a lumber museum and a Bark Peelers festival every year over the 4 th of July weekend. The museum is open year round , I think or they should be. Both are very interesting.
 

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Very interesting and always like hearing about that era of time.
The publisher of the Sullivan Review newspaper in Dushore, PA was a gentleman named Doc Shoemaker. He was a wealth of information regarding logging in the area. Unfortunately Doc passed away a few years ago. He had many photos of the old logging operations and logging railroads in the area and was always willing to show them.

I don't know if his collections is still at the Sulley but if you get up that way stop in an ask.
 

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I'm not sure. I would stop in and talk with him. I knew which buttons to press to get him talking and I was a good listener. BTW he was also my veterinarian and went out of his way a few times for me. A great guy.
 

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Benjamin Kline wrote a great series of books about the narrow gauge logging era in Pa.
The book Pitch Pine and Prop Timber details many of the logging operations in north central Pa. I believe the book is still available on Amazon. I bought all of his books many years ago.
 

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Another good one is "Sawmills among the derricks" detailing logging railroads and lumbering in PA by Thomas T. Taber. There is a book for each area of PA. Very interesting stuff.
 
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