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Discussion Starter #1
As some know, the Horton name was bought by TenPoint Crossbows along with some equipment. Here is the brand new reverse draw Horton RDX that will debut tomorrow at the ATA. 370 fps, 10 inches cocked, adjustable buttstock, and a new brush arrow retention device instead of the typical twangy spring on most crossbows. $999 MSRP which is under what many thought this bow would come in at.

 

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I have a feeling they will sell like hotcakes. I like the arrow retention idea. That is a source of alot of noise in most crossbows.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
cspot said:
I have a feeling they will sell like hotcakes. I like the arrow retention idea. That is a source of alot of noise in most crossbows.
Yep. You can see the brushes in the second picture I posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Here is a better picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Without the Acudraw, some street prices are coming in around $800. That is way less than many expected and close to half of what Scorpyd are selling for.
 

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dpms said:
Without the Acudraw, some street prices are coming in around $800. That is way less than many expected and close to half of what Scorpyd are selling for.
Yep. I think staying south of $1,000 for an RDT it will sell like crazy. I think most assumed that since it was Tenpoint it would be well north of the $1,000 mark.
 

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I think my 2 year old Parker may be for sale soon. Ha! That's a sweet x-bow. Wow!
 

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dpms said:
Without the Acudraw, some street prices are coming in around $800. That is way less than many expected and close to half of what Scorpyd are selling for.
Dpms, in your opinion, does Acudraw offer any advantages other than ease of cocking, or is it simply a cocking mechanism? Tenpoint seems to claim the consistent cocking of it adds to accuracy, which I find hard to believe.
 

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I can believe it.

I tried cocking my crossbow by hand, without using the string cocking device. I wanted to see what would happen if I wanted to get off a second shot in a hurry and not mess around with getting the cocker out of my pocket.

It made a difference. It was all over the place.

That's my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Bates said:
Dpms, in your opinion, does Acudraw offer any advantages other than ease of cocking, or is it simply a cocking mechanism? Tenpoint seems to claim the consistent cocking of it adds to accuracy, which I find hard to believe.
The Acudraw is a crank that reduces cocking effort and increase shot to shot consistency. A rope cocker is as consistent as a crank but requires more effort. I prefer rope cockers to cranks as I don't want the extra weight of a crank on my bow.

The Storm has a rope cocker option called the Dedd Sled. Word is it is a short rope without pulleys so there is no mechanical advantage when cocking if the rumors are true. It will be consistent, shot to shot, but much harder to cock without they pulleys that most rope cockers have.

Many narrow limb bows are about impossible to cock by hand because the string angle is to great which pinches the fingers. Hand cocking can be done on many of the wider limbs bows bit accuracy can suffer. Remember, with crossbows, we are talking really high speeds. Any slight variance to where the string latch catches the string will certainly affect accuracy.
 

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dpms said:
Bates said:
Dpms, in your opinion, does Acudraw offer any advantages other than ease of cocking, or is it simply a cocking mechanism? Tenpoint seems to claim the consistent cocking of it adds to accuracy, which I find hard to believe.
The Acudraw is a crank that reduces cocking effort and increase shot to shot consistency. A rope cocker is as consistent as a crank but requires more effort. I prefer rope cockers to cranks as I don't want the extra weight of a crank on my bow.

The Storm has a rope cocker option called the Dedd Sled. Word is it is a short rope without pulleys so there is no mechanical advantage when cocking if the rumors are true. It will be consistent, shot to shot, but much harder to cock without they pulleys that most rope cockers have.

Many narrow limb bows are about impossible to cock by hand because the string angle is to great which pinches the fingers. Hand cocking can be done on many of the wider limbs bows bit accuracy can suffer. Remember, with crossbows, we are talking really high speeds. Any slight variance to where the string latch catches the string will certainly affect accuracy.
Thanks DPMS!!! I couldn't imagine mine being more accurate than it is (I use a rope cocker).
Great explanation. Learned something.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
PATurkeyHntr said:
What is the warranty on the new Horton bows? Do the reverse draw bows have the same limb breaking problems?
I believe TenPoint is 5 years on the limbs. I would imagine Horton would be the same. TenPoint limbs have been some of the best out there. Reverse limbs bow tend to have their limbs close to parallel so they dampen each other quicker after the shot imparting less stress on the limbs.
 

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All I can say say is that there is DEFINATELY a difference in point of impact when cocking by hand and using the accudraw on my 2013 Ten Pt. Turbo XT 2.
 
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