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Discussion Starter #1
f anyone would like some seeds to start a few paw paw trees, the paw paw research program at Kentucky State U. will send you 10 free seeds. They are currently harvesting and processing paw paw from their orchards for the pulp. They save seeds to send out. Send an email to [email protected] to ask for seeds. Lots of info on their website, www.pawpaw.kysu.edu.
 

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Will these trees be hardy in northeastern Pennsylvania? I don't think I have ever seen any growing here. What feeds on these trees? And can humans eat the fruit?
 

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Thanks I think I will try to get some of these. I have 10 acres and try to plant many different trees to feed wildlife
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Should be good for you. Hardy to zone 5 and hardy to -15F. I saw some paw paw trees bearing fruit last week in a nutgrove on Cornell's campus in Ithaca NY.

Fruit is edible when ripe but astringent/puckery prior to ripening. The fruit does not keep well once ripe so it has never caught on commercially. At KSU, they separate the pulp from the skins and seeds and freeze the pulp until used.

Most any animal would like the fruit. Deer do not typically browse the tree so they do not require protection.

Paw Paw trees are shade tolerant and usually an understory tree near moister areas. While mature trees will do well in full sun, it can damage and kill young trees. They'll need some artificial shade for the first 2-3 years if planted in a sunny location. Trees do not require pruning or care. Paw Paws are a smaller tree, 20-40ft tall. Due to long tap root and brittle roots, they can difficult to transplant but grafted trees are available as bare root or potted plants.

More information at KSU and other places on the web like here http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_astr.pdf
 

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Thanks I did get a message this afternoon and they are processing requests for the seeds now. I don't know if I plant them this fall or wait for spring. Maybe even try starting seeds now.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The seeds will need cold stratification before they will germinate. 70 to 100 days in the fridge with some damp sphagnum moss or paper towel to keep them from drying out.
 

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What Chickenlittle said- and also keep in mind germination rates are not stellar. Maybe 1 out of 5 or less, depending on luck. I'd get 20-40 seeds to start if you want half a dozen or more to grow- just in case. It's always better to toss ones you don't want than to wait 2-3 months for the cold strat to come up empty handed!

First time I did it, half of the packets w/damp moss were filled w/mold that destroyed the seeds...

Paw Paw and Persimmon trees are great for wildlife. If I had 10 acres to play around with, I'd do a bit of both. You can also get seeds for persimmon- I've used Sheffield Seed as a supplier in the past.

BH
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you let the seeds dry out, germination can be very poor. After 3 days drying at room temp, germination rates can be less than 20%.
 

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I came home yesterday with both cargo pockets full of Paw Paws. I ate all the ones that busted when I shook them down. Gave myself a stomach ache.
Seeds are laying all over the ground under the trees.
 

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I also received a zip lock baggie with the seeds in them. Only thing I question is that someone wrote on the bag "2013'. I hope this is a mistake.
 
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