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Discussion Starter #1
For a wood rifle stock, some say free float it from a point just forward of the chamber, some say best is fully bedded to the very end of the stock. Best for accuracy?
 

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IMHO, I've found it best to bed 'em up to the recoil lug and leave the barrel free float. The recoil lug itself should be bedded in the back only and the sides and front should be taped at least twice before you seat the barreled action, so when the tape is removed, the sides and front of the lug are not touching anything.

SW
 

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Sethwood, can you explain the advantage of not fully bedding thre recoil lug? I have always fully bedded mine and have had very good accuracy results. However, I am always looking for a new process and I am curious about what you described. Not fully bedding the lug would, for starters, make initial disassembly after the bedding hardens a lot easier!
 

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For a wood stock, ya have to free float. Wood expands and contracts due to humidity and temperature changes.

Ya can fully bed one of them goofy plastic stocks and achieve good results because they are basically inert when it comes to climatic changes. But for wood....free float....'cause ya just never know when that beautiful piece of finely figured walnut is gonna do something funky.
 

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Sethwood said:
IMHO, I've found it best to bed 'em up to the recoil lug and leave the barrel free float. The recoil lug itself should be bedded in the back only and the sides and front should be taped at least twice before you seat the barreled action, so when the tape is removed, the sides and front of the lug are not touching anything.

SW
I've read several articles and post on bedding, and I guess you can come away with your own conclusion, but to me it makes sense that you want the stock to absorb the rearward initial shock of the shot. What you don't want is the lug to be "tied" into the stock.

If you read THIS LINK about stress free pillar bedding, this guy bed's only the rear of the lug, but doesn't really give his reason...other than the entire process is "stress free" when done.

I think when you bind the lug, this changes the harmonics of the barrel. And that's what you don't want to change.

SW
 

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Re: Free float or fully bedded rifle barrel channe

If you have ever spent the money to have a top notch Smith bed a barrel or have had the opertunity to look at a top benchrest shooters rifle you'll find they are pillar bedded and have the action bedded in front of the recoil lug up to an 1 1/2" on the barrel. I have never seen the barrel bedded the entire length
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Re: Free float or fully bedded rifle barrel channe

Thanks to all. Some variation from one post to the next, yet none recommended a fully bedded barrel channel on a wood stock. I used to think as I mentioned originally. My last stock job I bedded everything around the entire action including the tang area and as I mentioned a bit up the barrel past the chamber area. This .270 gun shoots 2 inches at 100 yards with worn edges to the lands in the barrel. I'm considering having the bore re-cut to a .280 or .30-'06. Just bought a high Q rifle fully bedded up the channel on a walnut stock. I'll know more after I find the time to shoot it in sometime in the next few weeks. Good shootin' to all.
 
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