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What is the law for transporting flintlock muzzleloaders in a vehicle. Can you have a load in the barrel as long as the pan is not charged with powder.? Or does the barrel have to be clear ?
 

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Page 16 of the digest spells it out. The primer, percussion cap, powder in the pan or battery must be remove before transporting in a vehicle if the barrel is charged. Recommended shooting the charge into a soft earth bank to be really safe.
 

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John, as usual, has this right. However, on my flinters I do not fire the rifle or pull the ball if I am moving by car. I dump the powder from the pan and place a piece of cloth on the pan, then lower the frizzen on it and drop the cock to "half". At the end of the day though, even if I know I am going out the next day or withing a few days, I pull the ball. I never fire it to unload, although I have been tempted. Too noisy (and being a lazy so-and-so I don't want to do the deep cleaning).
 

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I don't know how they work but you can buy a CO2 device that you put to the flash hole ot on the nipple that you can use to blow the charge out.
 

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John S said:
I don't know how they work but you can buy a CO2 device that you put to the flash hole ot on the nipple that you can use to blow the charge out.
They work very well...and are a worthwhile investment. Can also be used to dislodge various objects that get lost down the bore. Just keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction because whatever is in there will come out with enough force to cause various degrees of harm.
 

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I know what I am about to ask is "not safe practice" but would it hunt to leave it loaded, say for a couple weeks? I have no young uns around so that part of the saftey issue isn't one.
 

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ICAREDOYOU said:
I know what I am about to ask is "not safe practice" but would it hunt to leave it loaded, say for a couple weeks? I have no young uns around so that part of the saftey issue isn't one.
I have left barrels charged for up to a week. Never caused any harm. I don't bring the firearm into the house. Where I do leave it, I have a little sign that says "barrel charged!" that is attached.

The biggest damage concern would be with moisture combining with the powder. I would suspect some patch lubes could be enough.
 

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ICAREDOYOU said:
I know what I am about to ask is "not safe practice" but would it hunt to leave it loaded, say for a couple weeks? I have no young uns around so that part of the saftey issue isn't one.
You will get varying opinions on that. Some will tell you it doesn't hurt anything, that performance will be exactly the same as a freshly loaded rifle. That may be their experience, and I respect that. My own routine is to fire and quickly clean the rifle at the end of every hunting day. Quite a few years ago, I kept a flintlock loaded for the entire season, just brushing the powder out of the pan every time I put it my truck. On the last day I had a good opportunity, but was rewarded with the longest hangfire I've ever seen, and I missed the slowly moving deer. Since then, I feel better just not taking any chances.
 

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they have found flintlocks 100/200 years old still loaded, primed them up and they fired....i have left my flintlock loaded from oct to jan one year, but i also left it in the garage where it was not in/out of the heat to form condensation....last day of flintlock in jan it fired......bob

....
 

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Put it this way.. u can leave the barrel charged for as long as u want... You can also never Change the oil in your car.. But I wouldn't suggest doing either... I'll leave mine charged for a few days in late flintlock season... If I don't get any shots at deer in a few days then I shoot it out.. I'm superstitious though.. I feel as though it is a "unlucky load"!!!
 

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I was checking out a ML flinter in a gun store once and I took the ramrod and slid it down the bore and when it hit bottom it went THUNK. I marked the rod with my thumb nail, withdrew it from the bore and then laid it along side the barrel. It was about an inch short of the flash hole. I showed it to the store owner and together we pulled a PRB from the gun and a quantity of blackpoweder fell out. That gun had been in his store for several months as a consignment piece. There was a flint in the jaws too.
 

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jimsdad said:
I was checking out a ML flinter in a gun store once and I took the ramrod and slid it down the bore and when it hit bottom it went THUNK. I marked the rod with my thumb nail, withdrew it from the bore and then laid it along side the barrel. It was about an inch short of the flash hole. I showed it to the store owner and together we pulled a PRB from the gun and a quantity of blackpoweder fell out. That gun had been in his store for several months as a consignment piece. There was a flint in the jaws too.
Wow!
 

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great white hunter said:
jimsdad said:
I was checking out a ML flinter in a gun store once and I took the ramrod and slid it down the bore and when it hit bottom it went THUNK. I marked the rod with my thumb nail, withdrew it from the bore and then laid it along side the barrel. It was about an inch short of the flash hole. I showed it to the store owner and together we pulled a PRB from the gun and a quantity of blackpoweder fell out. That gun had been in his store for several months as a consignment piece. There was a flint in the jaws too.
Wow!
I grew up near an old Indian Museum where there were many muzzle-loading rifle and shotguns hanging on the walls. One day we checked some of them and many, if not most, of them still had charges in the barrel. Some of them had been used in various Civil War or Indian Wars battles and still had many charges in them. Some of them were full of charges almost to the end of the barrel. Most likely in the excitement of the battle and many guns all going off at the same time the soldier thought his gun had fired when it hadn’t and he reloaded time after time until his gun was both full of charges and useless as a gun. They were then reduced to using the bayonet or using it as a club. I’m sure they did both when it came down to living or dying.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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jimsdad said:
I took the ramrod and slid it down the bore and when it hit bottom it went THUNK. I marked the rod with my thumb nail, withdrew it from the bore and then laid it along side the barrel. It was about an inch short of the flash hole.
Just like to add so others don't expect the ramrod to go beyond about an inch above the flash hole on an empty gun. Its been asked on here before if something was wrong because the ramrod wasn't going down to the flash hole. The ramrod will stop about an inch above the flash hole because it does not enter beyond the threaded end of the breech plug, the hole is too small. On the Lyman plug I have here there is about .6" of round thread and then about another .3" of octagon before the flash hole.
 

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The CO2 discharger is the way to go. Works awesome. That said, I'll still leave a charge in my flinter for a few days if I plan to hunt. I read a few years back when I did some research on the topic that extreme temperature variations that occur for example when you bring your rifle inside from a day of hunting in 20 degree weather, that moisture can accumulate and could affect the quality of your powder, perhaps leading to a failed charge or extreme hangfire. I will try and keep mine in the case in either the truck under the tonneau or in the garage so as to eliminate that issue. But never more more than 2 to 3 days.
 

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BowMaster, careful leaving your rifle in the garage. I did just that, so as to not having it sweat, and lost it do to a
:2gunsfiring: THIEF!!!
 

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Just a couple of experiences and "practices" that had happened to me, or that I've done in the past.

1) Damp snow on the ground day and a group of us were hunting just the morning. We had finished up with chasing deer and no shots fired. I went to unload my rifle and just got the "pan poof". After 3 or 4 flash hole pokes and pan poofs, another flash hole poke was made. The rifle was pointed in a safe direction, and my nephew was beside me as we were both kneeing down to get this charge to go off. The pan was completely clean....as a whistle. I cocked the hammer to make sure we were going to get spark, and my nephew said "go ahead....I'm watching", pulled the trigger and the gun went off like a center fire rifle!!! That's how fast it occurred.

Now, no fear of anyone getting hurt as all rules were followed...muzzle in a safe direction....both he and I were aware of what we were doing....but we were both startled when the spark "jumped" into the flash hole and the gun went off!!!

When I choose to keep a charge in my T\C overnight, I will simply tap out the brass barrel pin, and remove the barrel from the breach hook, wrap the flash hole in a rag and keep the barrel in a safe place.

Just some thoughts.

sw
 

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Some guys dump the primer and insert a toothpick into the touch hole, although I always felt the gun should be discharged or unloaded to be put in the car to be safest, and followed that approach.

I once purchased an old double barrel muzzleloader shotgun at an auction up near summit station PA. It had two loads on top of each other in one barrel.
 

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I empty my flintlock at the end of every day. Leaving the gun outside may seem correct, but I've had misfires, and wet powder just from big temp changes while hunting. IMO wet and then dried powder wont burn the same. You might only get one shot during muzzle loader season, I am not willing to risk the gun not firing because I was too lazy to pull the ball and do a quick cleaning when I get home.
 

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zimmerstutzen said:
Some guys dump the primer and insert a toothpick into the touch hole, although I always felt the gun should be discharged or unloaded to be put in the car to be safest, and followed that approach.

I once purchased an old double barrel muzzleloader shotgun at an auction up near summit station PA. It had two loads on top of each other in one barrel.
I like pre 1840 electrical tape ...instead of a toothpick. I use pre 1840 Altoid tins too.
 
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