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Discussion Starter #1
I see RMC oxyoke, is selling a Jaspis flint, looks like the old Thompson Center 7200 black flint, I just wonder if it is the same?

RMC is also recommending the Jaspis flint on there flintlocks.


Anyone using the Jaspis flint?
 

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I see RMC oxyoke, is selling a Jaspis flint, looks like the old Thompson Center 7200 black flint, I just wonder if it is the same?

RMC is also recommending the Jaspis flint on there flintlocks.


Anyone using the Jaspis flint?
First I ever heard of the Jaspis flint? Been using Tom Fuller's English flints which IMO are 2nd to none.
 

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They look like cut German Flints. Not sure why RMC would sell them. They have never been as good as English flints for L&R locks which is what are used in RMC's rifles. However, a quick search on RMC's web site did not show any rifle sized flints except the Jaspis. (Musket flints yes) I am always willing to learn about something better, but 40 years of muzzle loading and I have never heard of cut flints being as good on custom locks as English, or amber or chert.
 

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I looked them up and at $14 I think the ones on my knapping tarp are lookin real good, I have used Hornstone with great success and Cobden is excellent. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Something I found out about the different types of flint From RMC Oxyoke

German Jaspis is a man made stone and is the hardest flint on the market average 80 + shots.

German Agate is the middle of the road not to hard and not to soft average 40 shots

English flint is the softest stone average 15-25 shot

Some can get more or less from there flint

Also the harder the flint the harder it is on your frizzen.
 

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I like saying I use Demfree flints. you know....you heard of them...dem free flints you get when lazy, uneducated flint shooters throw them away at the range. Over the last 25 years I may have purchased about 4 flints I felt were perfect in every way. Dem free flints are 80%er's. They just need dressed up by quick nap or hunter napping. Quick or Hunters napping is with a preferred unloaded gun and the flint in the jaws; you line up the flints' cutting edge with the bottom of the frizzen; draw hammer back slightly and release, causing the flint to strike the bottom of the frizzen. This flakes of very small pieces of the flint and resharpening it. You do it a couple times until you have a sharp edge. I try to, first help the guys that discard flints with instructions. Most don't want help. I guess they feel they look bad if the admit they'd like help; that's my gain. I'd ask, "You don't want that?' If not I pocketed them. The best time for me is always Saturday and Sunday prior to flintlock deer season, here in PA. The most flints I ever recovered was 38 on one Saturday/Sunday weekend before Christmas, in the mid 1990's. I usually get 14-20 most years. I haven't done that, much, since 2013, when I moved to the Pittsburgh, PA area. Seems the members of shooting clubs and shooters in general in this area, don't shoot their flintlocks. When I'd get cut agate or other cut stones, I fixed them and give them to someone who likes them. I'm first an English, second a French Amber, flint guy.
 

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Sort of maybe' Depends on the lock geometry and the hardness of the frizzen. The more directly the flint bashes into the frizzen, the more likely a flint will chip and break. A better designed lock has the flint edge come down in an arc that is very close to the arc of the frizzen, As the flint scrapes along the frizzen, it pushes the frizzen open at just about the same time as the flint leaves the bottom of the frizzen. Thompson center locks especially the early ones were basically battering rams that bashed the flint open. In addition, the TC frizzens were crappy case hardened things with very thing layers of carbon on the surface. Once a flint dug through the hard layer, the frizzen was almost done for. Locks with better geometry actually can easily go more than 100 shots with a quality flint. My North Star trade gun had the same flint for almost 10 years of hunting and target competition. The flint eventually split near in half and was done. With a siler or other quality lock, an Ebglish flint can last a long time, assuming you pick it right in the first place. Too many people buy flints on a card blister pack and end up with crap without realizing it. An english flint should be a translucent uniform gray, not muddy looking or swirly.. Hold it up to the light, and if there are any chips or cracks, pass on it. The same pretty much applies to Chert and Amber. Those artificial German flints are not all that long lasting and will not throw the same shower of sparks as reliably as some custom locks using English flints. If your lock geometry is off, a German may well last longer, it is tougher and harder, but not necessarily as good at sparking , under ideal conditions, as English. As a result the German made last through more bashings than an English flint. If your geometry is dead on, the English will last longer.
 

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Your right Zimm, the flints angle is like slicing the spark off the frizzen and dropping it into the pan. A lot of the angle and corrections can also be fixed by how the flint is held between the jaws, also. Shaping the leather or lead can aide to shape or place the flint at the correct angle. Most guys can't understand the hammer angle geometry. You can see a flint that isn't sharp and sharpening it works. if you had fifty + shots and then the flash is lost, the geometry of it isn't the problem. The biggest fail in proper alignment is in factory locks. after a few hundred are made then the machines can go thousandths out of adjustment and that makes a lot of bad angled hammers. Bad flint shape is no reason because that can be fixed by lead or leather adjusting to fix the strike angle. But going to a gunsmith, preferably one with some good expertise in flintlocks, can be helpful if your a newby and prefer that route. Ask for an estimate for the work prior to having it done. That way you have an idea what it's going to cost.
 

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I bought my son a new RMC BACK IN Dec.It looked like a regular English flint so I didn't question it.We probably shot 40-50 shots with it,without a single misfire or adjustment.Maybe it came with a german jaspis
.
 

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I have two flinters - One has the German Jaspis & the other has a German Agate ... The issues I've had with my flintlocks haven't been flint related. Get a good spark with both and both seem to be holding up well.

Before going to those - I had whatever came with my one gun when I bought it off my cousin. I think it was an English, but I'm not sure.
 
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