The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Am I correct in saying that fishers were relatively killed off and that the Pgc restocked them on game lands? Reason I ask
Is that the kid got one on trail cam today about 8 miles from the gl......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Takemrarely said:
Am I correct in saying that fishers were relatively killed off and that the Pgc restocked them on game lands? Reason I ask
Is that the kid got one on trail cam today about 8 miles from the gl......
Fishers were brought in by the PGC in the 1990's and stocked into the northcentral region in the Quehanna Wild Area. In the mean time, fisshers that were brought in by the West Virginia DNR in the late 60's and early 70's quickly expanded their range and moved into southwestern PA. The fisher population has greatly expanded and over compensated since the fisher trapping season has begun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just read the piece in Game News on them this morning......(forgot it was in there).

Found it interesting that when listing the food sources for them, while eggs were mentioned, turkey was not.

Have seen many posts on here where posters said fishers would decimate the turkey population......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,986 Posts
Been almost 20 years now, for the most they were released in the north central mountains but over time natural dispersion has them spread to just about every corner of PA...supposedly to eat porcupines but they soon found out turkey, rabbits, squirrel, your pets and livestock all taste better !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Takemrarely said:
Just read the piece in Game News on them this morning......(forgot it was in there).

Found it interesting that when listing the food sources for them, while eggs were mentioned, turkey was not.

Have seen many posts on here where posters said fishers would decimate the turkey population......
The Game Commission will never admit they made a mistake but they did with reintroducing this killing machine. They will and do kill adult turkeys and also can take a fawn down with no effort. Everyone keeps blaming the coyote for different populations demise. Fishers are just as efficient hunters as any predator in Pa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,227 Posts
6-DASHER said:
Been almost 20 years now, for the most they were released in the north central mountains but over time natural dispersion has them spread to just about every corner of PA...supposedly to eat porcupines but they soon found out turkey, rabbits, squirrel, your pets and livestock all taste better !!
Livestock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,571 Posts
FYI I just read in the papper today (Times Leader Wilkes Barre) that the PGC will be having a film on the fisher this week at the NE office in Dallas, PA. July 13th. I will see if I can find the article and post a link. Waugh!

No luck finding electronic link.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,707 Posts
This was one of the first areas to receive stocked fisher, though there might have been a few that had migrated into the southwest corner of the state, from West Virginia, before we had them here.

Our turkey populations have been stable to thriving, depending on the spring weather conditions, every year since they arrived.

They have also done fawn mortality studies in the same area as the first fisher releases and guess what. Not even one of the fawns that died of predation was the result of a fisher kill.

Though fisher could kill an adult turkey, if they caught one, and though they could kill a fawn, even raccoons have been known to kill a fawn on rare occasions, it doesn't appear to be much of a problem or even a real concern.

It seems the fisher is much more likely to kill squirrels, and most of them red squirrels at that, than just about any other prey that hunters would have any interest in.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
R. S. B. said:
This was one of the first areas to receive stocked fisher, though there might have been a few that had migrated into the southwest corner of the state, from West Virginia, before we had them here.

Our turkey populations have been stable to thriving, depending on the spring weather conditions, every year since they arrived.

They have also done fawn mortality studies in the same area as the first fisher releases and guess what. Not even one of the fawns that died of predation was the result of a fisher kill.

Though fisher could kill an adult turkey, if they caught one, and though they could kill a fawn, even raccoons have been known to kill a fawn on rare occasions, it doesn't appear to be much of a problem or even a real concern.

It seems the fisher is much more likely to kill squirrels, and most of them red squirrels at that, than just about any other prey that hunters would have any interest in.

Dick Bodenhorn
I have to respectfully disagree with with your statement Dick. Have you ever hunted the Quehanna Wild Area or anywhere there abouts? I have hunted the Q and surrounding areas for over 40 years and the turkey population has been on a decline for the past 20 years. Fisher tracks and sightings have been prevalent in that time frame. You work for the Game Commission and you will stand by their decisions and I respect that, but you need to hear it from people who actually hunt in the areas where the Fisher Cat was reintroduced. As for the fawn mortality study, I won't even get into that. What a friggin joke and waste of money.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,707 Posts
Little Big Man said:
R. S. B. said:
This was one of the first areas to receive stocked fisher, though there might have been a few that had migrated into the southwest corner of the state, from West Virginia, before we had them here.

Our turkey populations have been stable to thriving, depending on the spring weather conditions, every year since they arrived.

They have also done fawn mortality studies in the same area as the first fisher releases and guess what. Not even one of the fawns that died of predation was the result of a fisher kill.

Though fisher could kill an adult turkey, if they caught one, and though they could kill a fawn, even raccoons have been known to kill a fawn on rare occasions, it doesn't appear to be much of a problem or even a real concern.

It seems the fisher is much more likely to kill squirrels, and most of them red squirrels at that, than just about any other prey that hunters would have any interest in.

Dick Bodenhorn
I have to respectfully disagree with with your statement Dick. Have you ever hunted the Quehanna Wild Area or anywhere there abouts? I have hunted the Q and surrounding areas for over 40 years and the turkey population has been on a decline for the past 20 years. Fisher tracks and sightings have been prevalent in that time frame. You work for the Game Commission and you will stand by their decisions and I respect that, but you need to hear it from people who actually hunt in the areas where the Fisher Cat was reintroduced. As for the fawn mortality study, I won't even get into that. What a friggin joke and waste of money.
Quehanna isn't the only area where fisher were stocked. There were fisher stocked in my district. I worked in the area just about every day before they were stocked and just about every day after they were stocked right up to the time I retired. I hunted the areas before I retired and I hunt it even more since I retired. I lived in the area for a number of years before fisher were released and have lived in the area the entire time since I retired. I have seen many fisher since they were stocked.

I have seen turkey populations fluctuate before the fishers and saw periods before the fishers were here when turkey numbers were much lower than they have been in any years since the fisher releases.

I also know that increase in decline in turkey number before and after fisher releases is factual because every year of my career I and every other WCO across the entire state recorded all of our daylight miles and every turkey sighting we had every day we were out there. That way they could calculate the number of turkeys we saw by mile driven.

While some people like to apply there personal observations and opinions in relation to various wildlife populations the Game Commission actually collects data in a scientific manner that comes as close as possible to having real and factual knowledge about what is and isn't happening with the various wildlife species and populations across this state.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
Lots around here in Crawford County seeing more and more last few years had one chase a rabbit in my yard this spring I went out to take pics with phone it ran right by me within 10 foot of me several times just sniffin' away.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top