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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a used traditions deerhunter 3 years ago, and it has sat in gun safe since. I finally took it out this morning and while it was fun to shoot I couldn’t hit the broad side of the barn with it. Shooting high right from 25yards not even on paper at 50. I think some of it may be me pulling and flinching but the sights suck.
 

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I'm sure the sights are fine, its you, I guarantee. Not saying that in a bad way, but with a flintlock practice definitely makes perfect. You can't go out two days before the season, having never fired the gun, and expect great results. Take it out several times a year and play around with it, and I guarantee you will see results.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I know I figured most of it was me, but I am thinking of getting a set of rmc v peep sights for it. I will probably just take the bow out late season again until I get used to the flintlock.
 

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It could be a a combination of factors. As others have said, practice is essential for accuracy with a flintlock. Another factor could be what kind of bullet you are shooting. Different muzzleloaders have different rates of twist in the rifling and this leads to some bullets being more accurate than others. I am not familiar with the specs and/or rifling on the gun you mentioned, but a good starting point may be to find out he rate of twist and then research to see what bullets are most accurate with that rifling. For example flintlocks with a slow rate of twist often are most accurate with a patched round ball, others may be more accurate with different conical bullets.
 

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It could be a a combination of factors. As others have said, practice is essential for accuracy with a flintlock. Another factor could be what kind of bullet you are shooting. Different muzzleloaders have different rates of twist in the rifling and this leads to some bullets being more accurate than others. I am not familiar with the specs and/or rifling on the gun you mentioned, but a good starting point may be to find out he rate of twist and then research to see what bullets are most accurate with that rifling. For example flintlocks with a slow rate of twist often are most accurate with a patched round ball, others may be more accurate with different conical bullets.
Quite right. I'm sure its similar to my son's Traditions Frontier Hawken. If so, then its got a 1/48 twist. This has always been claimed to be a good all around rate of twist, but in reality its more suited to conicals than round balls. If he tries a t/c maxi ball or a Lee REAL bullet, I bet he will see marked increase in accuracy. That and practice to minimize the flinch factor by ignoring the initial flash of the lock. That alone does more guys in than anything when shooting flintlocks. And if he tries to get the lock sparking faster, and there are ways to do this, he will also see improvement.
 

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My traditions only shoots round ball, As i found out the rifleing is deeper in a flintlock than in an inline.

Good luck, Stant
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It does have a 1:48 twist, and I am using patch and ball with 80grains of Black powder down the barrel.
 

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My traditions only shoots round ball, As i found out the rifleing is deeper in a flintlock than in an inline.

Good luck, Stant
I doubt rifling depth has anything to do with it. Its the rate of twist that determines whether the gun should be loaded with round balls or conicals.
 

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It's a little of both.
Deep rifling does help in shooting RB's.Most inlines are shallow rifling to seal the conical better.Deep rifling grabs the patch better when shooting RB's.
The rate of twist also lets you shoot higher volumes of powder and still have accuracy along with length of barrel to burn that volume.
Faster rate of twist DOES stabilize a conical better.Inlines like the 1:20's range.
Example
My TC Cherokee 32 cal has a 1:30 twist.Most guys that have them use 15-20grs of powder and a RB.Squirrel heads are no problem.
My TC 50cal shoots 80grs with 1:48 twist while my Lyman Great Plains 50 cal. with 1;66 will handle 100grs with same accuracy.
Other than custom barrels Lyman has the deepest rifling and like .018-.020 patches followed by TC that like .015-.018 patches..
 

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Ive tried 80 grains of 3f out of my deerhunter and couldn't hit a pie plate at 25 yards. I reduced my load to 70 grains and the difference was night and day. I can consistantly keep it in a 3 inch circle at 50 yards from the bench. The 295 grain powerbelts shot ok out of my gun, but the 245 grain shot much better. Also, the triggers on those guns can.be a bear. I adjusted mine a little bit and that also improved my shooting
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I will have to try 70 grains a friends said his shot well with 90 so I will just have to play around with it more. I was wanting to just stay with round balls mostly because I’m cheap.
 

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With 1:48 twist conical bullets usually work best. My Thompson is 1:66 twist and only shoots round balls. I was told by the muzzleloader man John Dewald in Muncy,Pa. that you can’t shoot Conicals / Buffalo bullets out of 1:66 twist barrel and get accuracy.
 

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Practice, especially "following through" the ignition much like an archery release. It was most of the learning curve for me. Until I got to the point where I didn't notice the lock going off I was pretty erratic.
 

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People who shoot a flintlock for the first time many times will lift their head as the pan ignites and that will make you miss what you are aiming at. It takes a little getting use to. In addition if you put too much powder in the pan that will make you flinch. Try with just a little powder and give the stock a little slap after you close the frizzen.
 

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Learning to ignore the pan flash is the best thing a person can do to get over the flinch. It took me a long time, but now I don't even see the pan flash. That and a quick and light double set trigger setting helps too, as your body doesn't have time to react to the flash and by then the main powder charge has gone off.
 

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I'm sure the sights are fine, its you, I guarantee. Not saying that in a bad way, but with a flintlock practice definitely makes perfect. You can't go out two days before the season, having never fired the gun, and expect great results. Take it out several times a year and play around with it, and I guarantee you will see results.
Have you seen the sights on older traditions deer hunters? They are straight up awful! But at 25-50 yds one should be able to make them work at those ranges
 

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Have you seen the sights on older traditions deer hunters? They are straight up awful! But at 25-50 yds one should be able to make them work at those ranges
No, I've never even handled an older Traditions gun, but I don't doubt what you say. The newer Traditions frontier rifle my son owns has pretty crappy sights.
 
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