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Our first trip up we stayed at a campground on Big Rideau 1966ish.... Mom wasn't happy that there was a 50' granite cliff down to the water..... the fact if we stood on the edge we could see fish in the water didn't help - I was 8yrs old... LOL. Found another campground with "beach" on Little Rideau just downstream(?) from the old manual lock at Crosby.

Don't recall Indian Lake, Clear lake rings a bell though. Big Rideau was more noted for pike and lakers during our time up there. Don't recall that tackle shop either - we used to go to one in Newburgh. Used to take the boat down to Westport tie up at the town dock for ice cream and shopping - there used to be an old Hudson's Bay Trading Post there(before they got Yuppified). Very old building might have been an "original" location... LOL
 

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Another good option is the Navionics ap for your phone. It's 10 bucks and has depth charts for most lakes in the US. The GPS option on your phone shows where you are, therefore giving you a fairly accurate depth. You can also mark spots to return to a productive area.
Ya works great for ice fishing too
 

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79inpa

A "fish finder" is just a sonar unit. If you buy a good unit and spend the time to learn how to use it you can detect fish in some instances especially in deeper water. I only use my units to find fish about 5 to 10% of the time and only when fishing for certain fish.

The best use of sonar units is to learn the depth and bottom features of the water your fishing. An inexpensive sonar can help you ID weeds, sand, rocks etc. which is good to know.

If you fish small bodies of shallow water you usually do not need a sonar unit. You can deduce what is under the water by observing what is above the water. On bigger waters they are helpful because they let you find depths and physical features that might attract or hold fish.

One other bit of info to consider. Many sonar users believe the fish can hear or detect the sonar pings and alert them. The jury is still out on this one for me but once I learn all I can about an area from the sonar I turn it off.......just in case.

Good luck
 

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First and foremost, get out there and fish..

For free, you can download navigation maps of almost any body of water worth noting. That will point out to you depth, channels, structure, ect. All valuable information.

For the kind of fishing I mostly do (trolling Lake Ontario, and other large bodies of water) a sonar unit is a valuable accessory. It can spot schools of bait, game fish, thermocline, bottom structure and depth, and do it in real time. In the great lakes, trout and salmon spend more time under bait balls, and keying in on temperature rather than structure. When downrigging, you are often trolling your lead balls just feet from the bottom. Slight changes in depth can cause major issues with your gear if you are not paying attention. In shallow water that "looks" deep enough, sonar can be cheap insurance against major hull and engine damage. All from a unit that can be as cheap as $100.00.

So, do you NEED one to go fishing? No. But having one can make the sport a whole lot more fun, safe, and productive.

Larry
 

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Icemole, I was mistaken I meant we fished Newboro Lake and not Big Rideau. Newboro is where we caught a bunch of decent pike. Indian Lake, Clear Lake, and Newboro Lake all were interconnected begining with Indian Lake just north of Chaffeys Locks. These were south of Westport and the Upper Rideau and Big Rideau. Oh and if I recall that tackle shop was actually barber shop I think that doubled as a tackle shop in the rear.

I loved going up there. My first Canadian fishing trips! Clear Lake had a big rock face that you could hike up too and jump off. For my graduation present, my dad took me and 3 of my friends and my stepbrother up there for a week. He was shocked when he saw us all jumping off it one day. I think he was mainly concerned with making sure my stepbrother came home to his mom in one piece, 🤣
 

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Ravin R9
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Most of my fishing is done on rivers like the Delaware & Main stem Susqy.
Both bodies of water at the areas I fish are not that deep so success comes with being able to read the water.
In my case I don't need electronics for fishing moving water like riffles and eddies.
 

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Most of my fishing is done on rivers like the Delaware & Main stem Susqy.
Both bodies of water at the areas I fish are not that deep so success comes with being able to read the water.
In my case I don't need electronics for fishing moving water like riffles and eddies.
Your casting right?
 

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Most of my fishing is done on rivers like the Delaware & Main stem Susqy.
Both bodies of water at the areas I fish are not that deep so success comes with being able to read the water.
In my case I don't need electronics for fishing moving water like riffles and eddies.
Depends if trolling or casting. If trolling need one for depth, other then that wouldn’t need one
Exactly don’t need one for casting. If trolling different story.
 

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I'm a fairly inexperienced fisherman. Most of the lakes I fish are fairly small and shallow. My fish finder never shows fish in shallow water but it does tell me the depth and shows me something about the structure. I find it useful for showing humps or drop offs which seem to usually be good spots, but mine at least is not really a fish finder.

When we go to Canada, the lakes tend to be deeper, and it will show some fish occasionally. But iv'e had little luck catching those fish, and i'm not sure if they really are fish. But it's still useful for finding structure and that's usually key to finding fish so I use it for that.
 

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Ravin R9
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No need to troll if I'm fishing moving water.
The only time I troll is on a lake for trout with spinners and rapalas. Have had good success doing this without the use of electronics.
I would think the use of electronics come into play when fishing deep lakes and being able to
see ledges and drop-offs.
 
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