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I usually shoot FF in my flinter, but I'm almost out, and am heading to the store to pick up another can before I do the yearly pre season check up/range trip. Is there that much difference between FF and FFF? I hear some guys say FFF gives qicker ignition than FF. Also, in a pinch I could use FFF in the pan, if I forget/lose my normal FFFF in my primer. So, stick with the FF or go for the FFF?
 

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I would try the 3F, My flinter likes 3F, Though there is little change in accuracy. With 3F I use 10 grains less powder than I would with 2F.
 

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1. yes some folks use 3fg in the pan, it is a bit slower in ignition, but it is a nearly imperceptible difference ie maybe a few thousandths of a second. Some guys have carefully crushed 2 fg to make primer powder. Using a wooden dowel to crush some powder on another piece of wood and not more than a few grains at a time. Powder burns on the fingers are quite painful)

2. 3fg is generally for guns under 50 caliber, but can be used in 50's and 54 in MODERATE loads. It burns with a bit more pressure and in many cases burns cleaner. If you are the type that needs to use over loads of powder, the switch from 2fg to 3fg could be face altering.

3 You didn't say what kind of gun or more importantly how long the barrel. In a short barrel gun, you can boost velocity and decrease trajectory a small bit by switching to 3fg. If you were trying to hit an antelope out on the high plains it might give you an extra 20 yds.

Here in the Pa deer woods, where ranges are usually less than 100 yds, it doesn't really matter.

It may change your point of impact enough that you will need to re sight your gun before the season.

I'd stick to 2fg if you are shooting 50 cal or greater.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Zimm, it's a TC Renegade (Barrel is only 26 in), in .50 cal. 90gr is what I shoot for my hunting load. I don't plan on shooting more than 100 yards, most places I hunt, I can't shoot that far anyway.
 

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On of the Lyman black powder manuals covers this topic with chrono and pressure data. In short, it's OK even in .54 cal, but you use less weight of powder for the same velocity.
I've been using 3f for 30 years or more. I still use 4f in the pan.
 

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fouling is both a matter of powder granulation, amount of charge and tightness of the patch ball combo When powder is burning and the pressure drops due to the bullet/ball exiting the muzzle, fouling seems to go up dramatically regardless of powder granulation in a loose patch ball combination fouling is increased as well. There are fellows who claim fouling is less in their guns with 2fg.

While that seems to be against the general rule, every gun and load has it's quirks. In a short barreled gun, loads should be such that the powder is substantially burned before muzzle exit, or fouling will increase no matter what.
 

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I had a Centermark Tulle in .62 caliber. I talked with Ray Woodall original owner/founder of CenterMark Arms, for two to three hours on the day I pick it up from his shop. He showed me targets sent to him from guys who'd won National Championships with his guns. Their loads were surprising to me tosayb the least, but I tried and used them. These guys were using 80 to 95 grains of FFFg, and .010 to .015 cotton patches; and all used the .600 lead roundball. I used 80 grains of FFFg, a .012 cotton pillow ticking and a .600 roundball. I tried others in my load experimental loads.n But mu gun like this load. You still need to check, experiment and develop your on load combinations. I use 75 grains of FFg in my .54 cal rifle and 80 gr FFg in my smooth .54 caliber.
 

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Mad_Jack said:
I had a Centermark Tulle in .62 caliber. I talked with Ray Woodall original owner/founder of CenterMark Arms, for two to three hours on the day I pick it up from his shop. He showed me targets sent to him from guys who'd won National Championships with his guns. Their loads were surprising to me tosayb the least, but I tried and used them. These guys were using 80 to 95 grains of FFFg, and .010 to .015 cotton patches; and all used the .600 lead roundball. I used 80 grains of FFFg, a .012 cotton pillow ticking and a .600 roundball. I tried others in my load experimental loads.n But mu gun like this load. You still need to check, experiment and develop your on load combinations. I use 75 grains of FFg in my .54 cal rifle and 80 gr FFg in my smooth .54 caliber.
OMG. Another centermark owner? I have one of their Fusil du Chasse .62 fowler from about 15 years ago. I killed one buck many moons ago with it. I wish it was rifled! I shoot about 80 grains of 2f with a 595 an a .020 patch . It's great to 50, but after that it's garbage. Somoothie!
 
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