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Discussion Starter #1
About hunting no being able to put a dent in the wolf population. Hopefully, the elk will be less stressed and calf recruitment back up to where it needs to be.

Pulled this off the Montana F/W web site.

Hagener said 175 wolves were taken by hunters and trappers in the 2012 calendar year, compared to 121 taken by hunters in 2011. The 95 wolves harvested in 2013 as a result of the hunting and trapping seasons that concluded Feb. 28, will be considered in the 2013 minimum wolf counts.
A total of 108 wolves were removed through agency control efforts in 2012 to prevent further livestock loss and by private citizens who caught wolves chasing or attacking livestock, up from 64 in 2011.
Confirmed livestock depredations due to wolves included 67 cattle, 37 sheep, one dog, two horses and one llama in 2012. Cattle losses in 2012 were the lowest recorded in the past six years.
http://fwp.mt.gov/news/newsReleases/headlines/nr_4073.html

And Idaho has taken over 300 wolves so far in 2012-2013 hunting season. I did see that the wilderness areas aka River of No Return and the Selway are lagging behind in harvesting them, Im thinking its due to not being able to get to them, both those areas are so massive and roadless.

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/?getPage=121
 

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Historically Wolf populations been wiped out in the US by hunting, trapping and poisoning due to unregulated season (open season).
Montana and Idaho now have regulated Wolf season for a managed population.

Funny thing, Western ranchers been trying the same, even today, with Coyote! Never has the Coyote population been wiped out.
 

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Western ranchers been trying the same, even today, with Coyote! Never has the Coyote population been wiped out
That was my original thinking but if the wolf population stats are correct, theyre shooting some where around 1/3 of the wolf population. In Alaska they used planes and helicopters to shoot wolves when normal hunting practices failed to control the population. Im wondering if when they are hunted for a few years how tough will they be to hunt?
 
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