The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I did a quick search on here before posting this question, and didnt see anything, so I thought I would ask what you feel is the distance you will shoot with confidence on your flintlock ? (I ask, because I personally dont get good groups over 50 yards with my 20 year old 54 cal Renegade)
I am asking for accuarcy, not killing power distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,691 Posts
with my t/c firestorm 50 yards with 2 50 gr pellets and a 240 gr cva power belt. it will kill a lot further than that but not in my hands. i think i am what is known in the business as "a flincher".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
With a 300 grain xtp in a sabot I will shoot out to 125 yards; RMC flinter with 100 grains of 3f Goex or 100 of Swiss 2f. My PA Hunter likes 90 grains and a 177/.490 ball. Max range on deer would be about 75 yards. It will group ok at longer ranges but inside 60 yards it has power for quick kills; longer range with a .490 roundball is a dice roll on effectiveness. Some drop in a short distance and some don't. I just won't drop the hammer anymore beyond 75 yards with a .50 roundball; even though it's my favorite projectile to load and hunt with.

If I have to put em down quick the 300 grain to the shoulders just makes em shutter and fall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
I have shot woodchucks with my .54 Hawken at a shade over 200 yards...from a prone, rested position of course. When that big 430 gr Remington hunter bullet would hit one it was like someone teed off with an 8 pound sledge hammer. Just flips em in the air and tears em right up! I can put 3 shots into a raquet ball at 100 yards with every one of my rifles...even the little deerstalker with its short barrel. If a rifle doesn't shoot for me the way I like it, it gets worked or sold. I used to shoot 200+ rounds a year in the off season to build/keep muscle memory for hunting with and shooting flinters. My old man and his friends took the sport VERY SERIOUSLY and required attention to detail and skill or you didn't hunt with them. Not that it wasn't a complete blast because those late season flintlock hunts are some of my fondest memories. How far can a flintlock kill a deer...reliably? I would have to say that is very subjective to the person behind the rifle and how much energy the projectile has when it gets there. For me, I don't like a shot over 100 yards on a shooting stick <u>which I do not go flintlock hunting without</u>. I have made longer shots (149 yards down a grape row on the range finder), but I wouldn't conciously do it regularly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,369 Posts
The effecive range of a flintlock is determined by the width of your front sight. If it covers your target, (deer vitals) beyond 50/75 yards, you are guessing about the impact area of your shot. If you can't see the heart/lung area of your targeted deer because your front sight is too wide, then you should not pull the trigger. Our special season does not need reports of wounded/unrecovered deer.

After Christmas, we are limited to traditional blade front sights or the non-traditional
, fiber optic sights. A killing, ethical shot rests with the shooter, and I feel confident that our group of post-Christmas, Flintlock Shooters understand the limits of their flintlock weapons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
Hunterisme said:
I did a quick search on here before posting this question, and didnt see anything, so I thought I would ask what you feel is the distance you will shoot with confidence on your flintlock ? (I ask, because I personally dont get good groups over 50 yards with my 20 year old 54 cal Renegade)
I am asking for accuarcy, not killing power distance.
What bullet are you shooting and what powder and charge do you use? If it's the old Renegade like I have, they seem to like a slightly lighter weight bullet or a round ball. Mine will punch a raged hole at 50 yards with 245 gr powebelt HPs over 80 grains of Shockey's Gold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
BerksCoflinter said:
A killing, ethical shot rests with the shooter, and I feel confident that our group of post-Christmas, Flintlock Shooters understand the limits of their flintlock weapons.
Oh would that I wish that were true! I used to get guys comming into my store as close as the night before the season (Xmas eve) to buy a flintlock...any flintlock so they could hunt with it the next day! I always told them with no hidden contempt in my voice that the displays were all we had and that they were reserved for other customers. I would rather lose a sale then have some ignorant slob stumbling around the woods with a rifle they new nothing about...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
i think there is no real answer to your question because every shooter is different.i think what it all boils down to is,what do you fell comfortable with myself iam not affraid to shoot 100yrds maybe a little farther but it depends on the weather such as wind but what it all comes down to is what you fill is your max limit that you can handle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
The best way to use ANY open sight (handgun, rifle) is to shoot to the top of the sight and not cover the target with the front sight. The front sight should cover nothing you are looking to hit; it should be under the hit spot. To shoot longer range than your normal zero; you need to hold more sight up in the rear notch but you still aim to the top of the sight. The sight covers nothing.

An example is a squirrels head should appear to sit on top of the front sight; not be covered by the bead. Open sights are far more versitle when used this way and it's the only way to use the partridge sights on a handgun to hit beyond 25 yards or so. It's called a 6 0'clock hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
mossie said:
The best way to use ANY open sight (handgun, rifle) is to shoot to the top of the sight and not cover the target with the front sight. The front sight should cover nothing you are looking to hit; it should be under the hit spot. To shoot longer range than your normal zero; you need to hold more sight up in the rear notch but you still aim to the top of the sight. The sight covers nothing.
That's right!! Take a "6 o-clock" sight picture. It's the way the Marines are tought and the way my old man, a former Korean War vet marine tought me to shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
It takes some getting used to but once you stick with this method of open sighting it opens up a whole new ability to hit with open sights and various ranges. You will have to re-sight and practice until it becomes second nature but it's far more effective. Once I learned to HOLD UP more sight or HOLD DOWN more sight with a handgun wow what a difference. You just need to learn how much. All my BP guns have the same fiber optic sights and are sighted the same way. My handguns are sighted FLAT SIGHTS @ 75 yards and I hold up or down in the notch for different ranges. I have hit groundhogs at 180 yards with a Python holding up sight and could still see the chuck. Rifles are not different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
mossie said:
The best way to use ANY open sight (handgun, rifle) is to shoot to the top of the sight and not cover the target with the front sight. The front sight should cover nothing you are looking to hit; it should be under the hit spot. To shoot longer range than your normal zero; you need to hold more sight up in the rear notch but you still aim to the top of the sight. The sight covers nothing.

An example is a squirrels head should appear to sit on top of the front sight; not be covered by the bead. Open sights are far more versitle when used this way and it's the only way to use the partridge sights on a handgun to hit beyond 25 yards or so. It's called a 6 0'clock hold.
That’s the best explanation i have heard.

I normally try to cover the body (vitals) and then fire(aligning the sights and covering the target). Luckily, i have gotten all deer I have hit with this Flinter (3) but always limited myself to under 50 yards due to covering too much of the deer itself. (Yes, I have missed them too) I won’t be shooting this deer season with it, as I have tagged enough this year. This explains why I have difficulty at the range as well. Great time to resight it in, in the summer. I like the maxiballs with 80 grain over the std traditional flinterballs. Not sure why this didn’t click in my head in the past, but your “squirrel's head” analogy made perfect sense. I also liked the shooting stick suggestion too, as I like to be in the woods still hunting at times due to the cold weather. A great time in the woods for sure. I passed on (12) doe last season, and opted to not shoot, but just enjoyed being out there taking it all in.

Thanks everyone for the great suggestions and comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,709 Posts
50 yards is MY effective kill range BUT I know guys who shoot 100 yards and kill deer.
Where I hunt I hardly ever shoot over 50 yards with my centerfire rifles anyway.
Not many 100 yard shots in the swamps of 3D.

Dave
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
462 Posts
mossie said:
The best way to use ANY open sight (handgun, rifle) is to shoot to the top of the sight and not cover the target with the front sight. The front sight should cover nothing you are looking to hit; it should be under the hit spot. To shoot longer range than your normal zero; you need to hold more sight up in the rear notch but you still aim to the top of the sight. The sight covers nothing.

An example is a squirrels head should appear to sit on top of the front sight; not be covered by the bead. Open sights are far more versitle when used this way and it's the only way to use the partridge sights on a handgun to hit beyond 25 yards or so. It's called a 6 0'clock hold.
My girlfriends dad taught me this last year at the range pre season after stating my frustration with not being as accurate as I felt I should be with my flinter. I hit 1 out of 4 or 5 deer I ever shot at with it prior to last season, last year I went 1/1 with that doe being at 93 yds. with a rock solid rest, no wind, and in a field where she was feeding and completely calm. Once I sighted in like this I was so much more accurate, it really was like night and day. Gone are the days of only shooting 50 and in, while still covering most of the vitals. on the range I got comfortable shooting farther than I ever thought possible FOR ME with open sights....any deer within 125yds, as long as I have a solid rest, is withing MY COMFORT range now!

My setup is a Traditions deerhunter 240gr. T/C Cheap Shot Sabot on top of 90gr. of 2x GOEX powder and 4x GOEX in the pan; that doe was down in 40yds!
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top