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Thanks Stan! I will pass along to my Mrs...she is very good at keeping Outdoors in the classroom (IE, raises and releases trout, hatches pheasant eggs, PGC in twice a year for BB boxes and presentation...)

But I can tell you it is harder and harder for her to find time in the day for it, with the overall standardizing of what kids are supposed to get out of school...(IE a certain score on a certain state evaluation test...)
 

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This is great, thanks. A neighbor just told me that all the rec centers in this city had target ranges not too long ago. We've lost a lot of that exposure. The kids want it, though. With local schools only giving 20 minutes for combined lunch/recess, and some schools giving no break at all, it's hard to imagine such vital programs. I am also not happy with all of the youth shooting being military-funded where they are taught, and would love to see hunting/outdoors skills taught, too.
 

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That would be great westphilly, but here in the the city you will never have the ranges again, nor will you have hunting/outdoor skills taught in the phila. schools. I have lived here all my life, I am 47 shooting and hunting were never liked by the liberals in charge of our city, & schools. It is looked at as being violent & not civilized. If not for our state preemption laws Phila.would be no different then NY city. If our children are to be shooters and or hunters we will have to teach them ourselves,& look for assistence from hunting, shooting & outdoor ORGs.
 

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Mike M. said:
That would be great westphilly, but here in the the city you will never have the ranges again, nor will you have hunting/outdoor skills taught in the phila. schools. I have lived here all my life, I am 47 shooting and hunting were never liked by the liberals in charge of our city, & schools. It is looked at as being violent & not civilized. If not for our state preemption laws Phila.would be no different then NY city. If our children are to be shooters and or hunters we will have to teach them ourselves,& look for assistence from hunting, shooting & outdoor ORGs.
Oh, absoabsolutely agree, Mike M. but we will continue to have lots of young boys with guns who never had anyone to teach them ethics and safety, though, which concerns me. And there are more adults floating around who've hunted than I would have thought, Im discovering. Channeling kids' interests in guns in a positive direction would be helpful. It's a little pipe dream of mine to have gun safety and shooting sports taught to our youth to reduce accidents and violent outbursts involving firearms where peer pressure to do the right thing can help. I've evolved a lot on this issue myself (I grew up in the city, too), so I understand the intellectual and cultural barriers to having kids learn shooting sports. But I do think the interest is there. In my neighborhood, there are regular kids raising and slaughtering chickens and the largest Future Farmers of America chapter in the state is in Philly. Eventually all of this urban agriculture/environmental education interest is going to foster a broader interest in the outdoors that will include hunting. My daughter came back from a camp for inner city kids last summer where she learned about deer overpopulation with one thing on her mind - learning to hunt as a method of conservation. You could say she's special, but she has four friends - all girls - who are interested in learning, too. I find the city kids and parents I know are way more open to it than my suburban friends are with their kids. It's a dream, but I'm crossing my fingers that we find some equilibrium again. As we lose population, kids in the city will need to have more exposure to different ways of life.
 

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WestPhilly,
You go girl!!!
Keep up the work to get more young folks envolved in OUTDOOR activities. Best way to learn is to do. Go orienteering or Geocaching to learn terrain association and COMPASS use take them for observation hikes to see and train yourselves to track and trail. Neat stuff you can do if you want to put in the effort.
Smage
 

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Born and raised in Phila., this hits home. Sadly, I never had any outdoor ed. in school. I was lucky in having a grandmother that kept a garden, took me to a real butchershop, and showed me how to cook. I remember fishing the banks of the Delaware, Wiss, and Pennypack and getting in trouble for leaving in the dark or comming home late. One of the highlights of my childhood was going to Susq. Co. with a friend's family to chop and stack firewood on Labor Day weekend! As a city kid, I knew my math, but now I also knew a cord, face cord, etc. We were allowed to shoot cans before we went home if the chores were done! Sadly, so many of my friends never opened their eyes to see beyond "the block." They are still there, on "the block," many never being anywhere other than Philly and the Jersey Shore.
 

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smage1 said:
WestPhilly,
You go girl!!!
Keep up the work to get more young folks envolved in OUTDOOR activities. Best way to learn is to do. Go orienteering or Geocaching to learn terrain association and COMPASS use take them for observation hikes to see and train yourselves to track and trail. Neat stuff you can do if you want to put in the effort.
Smage
Yes, absolutely, and you can do all those things right in the city - you don't even need a car. Recently we've been able to see wild turkey, a great blue heron, a bald eagle's nest, wood ducks, mallards, Canada geese, a few deer, rabbit scat, tracks we'll have to learn to identify, ALL right within city limits and accessible by bus. No excuses for not getting this kind of education
Luckily, there is a bunch of good funding and interested people out there.
 

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DVD said:
Born and raised in Phila., this hits home. Sadly, I never had any outdoor ed. in school. I was lucky in having a grandmother that kept a garden, took me to a real butchershop, and showed me how to cook. I remember fishing the banks of the Delaware, Wiss, and Pennypack and getting in trouble for leaving in the dark or comming home late. One of the highlights of my childhood was going to Susq. Co. with a friend's family to chop and stack firewood on Labor Day weekend! As a city kid, I knew my math, but now I also knew a cord, face cord, etc. We were allowed to shoot cans before we went home if the chores were done! Sadly, so many of my friends never opened their eyes to see beyond "the block." They are still there, on "the block," many never being anywhere other than Philly and the Jersey Shore.
My kids would kill to chop wood
I was lucky to have my Dad. My mom was from Kensington and is pretty much "allergic" to the outdoors, but my Dad ranged around Delaware County as a kid so he took us on hikes and to fish all the time, mostly in the Wissahickon. One summer we followed Tookany Creek for miles and miles, picking up where we left off each time to cover a lot of territory. I meet people all the time who grew up knowing "country" skills, though - when we went to get haybales at Home Depot in South Philly for an archery target, the sales associate knew all about bowhunting from spending time with relatives in the South. A lot of the families who came up from the South to escape segregation have been going back and forth ever since, so you meet a lot of people who were sent to the Carolina or Georgia as kids to their grandmothers where they were exposed to all of this. Those folks are usually around my age (40) or a little older, and the next generation all ties will likely die out unles the outdoor education really sets hold. It's happening all over, thank goodness, but kids don't really have enough free time or freedom to really explore enough like you did.It's too structured and hurried. But, even my woefully underfunded neighborhood public school has a schoolyard garden. And there are great programs at Bartram's Garden, Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, and the Heinz Wildlife Refuge. My kids never would have had this level of exposure if it weren't for those organizations and their kids' programs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Make sure to use the resources sportsmen pay for as well; The Fish and Boat Commission and Game Commission. Both offer staff and resources that span actual hunting, trapping and fishing to the wildlife and ecosystems locally and statewide.

Many of those components can be incorporated into lesson plans that address past, present, and future industry and commerce, ecological concerns, and general conservation practices. Providing the thought that man has a responsibility to save and protect our natural world even as we utilize the resources needed for modern society.

There is a wealth of actual history and results to be learned and even seen to this day in this state where the lack of attention to the natural world were not known or protected. To this day, all citizens are still paying the cost in real money and affects of these legacies.

Conservation rather than "Green or Environmental" lesson plans should be taught. Wise use over no use or seeking road blocks should be stressed. Looking at the effects of the past and how it is impacting the here and now are important.

From acid mine drainage, dams built for expediency out living safety considerations, or how the forestry practices of a century ago still impact humans and wildlife today are all topics of interest and practical learning.


Learning about wildlife is interesting for most students. Adding the facts that sportsmen are responsible for the wide range of wildlife in the US is as important. Just as the restoration efforts of the bald eagle and other threatened wildlife is by the money provided by sportsmen - not animal rights groups.


Frankly, in light of all the gun control and overall gun safety issues in the news of late.... and decades past - there is no reason every school in the state shouldn't be teaching the Eddie Eagle Program as a mandatory class.

As you are in Philly, the history of the city now, past and even the future has and still depends on the natural resources of this state. Everything from clean water, to locally produced food depends on the larger natural world. Even without a totally hunting tilt, exposing the kids to the real aspects of wildlife and the natural world and how sportsmen are an integral part maintaining and restoring that is a great and often ignored message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program teaches children in pre-K through third grade four important steps to take if they find a gun. These steps are presented by the program's mascot, Eddie Eagle®, in an easy-to-remember format consisting of the following simple rules:

If you see a gun:
STOP!
Don't Touch.
Leave the Area.
Tell an Adult.

Begun in 1988, The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program has reached more than 20 million children -- in all 50 states. <span style="font-weight: bold">This program was developed through the combined efforts of such qualified professionals as clinical psychologists, reading specialists, teachers, curriculum specialists, urban housing safety officials, and law enforcement personnel. </span>


<span style="font-weight: bold">Anyone may teach The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program, and NRA membership is not required. The program may be readily incorporated into existing school curriculum, taught in a one- to five-day format, and used to reach both levels or simply one or two grades. Materials available through this program are: student workbooks, 7-minute animated video (available on DVD or VHS), instructor guides, brochures, and student reward stickers. Program materials are also available in Spanish. </span>


The NRA is committed to helping keep America's young children safe. In efforts to do so, we offer our program at a nominal fee. Schools, law enforcement agencies, hospitals, daycare centers, and libraries may be eligible to receive grant funding to defray program costs. Grant funding is available in many states to these groups to cover the cost of all program curriculum materials.



<span style="font-weight: bold">The purpose of the Eddie Eagle Program isn't to teach whether guns are good or bad, but rather to promote the protection and safety of children. The program makes no value judgments about firearms, and no firearms are ever used in the program.</span> Like swimming pools, electrical outlets, matchbooks and household poison, they're treated simply as a fact of everyday life. With firearms found in about half of all American households, it's a stance that makes sense.



<span style="font-weight: bold">Eddie Eagle is never shown touching a firearm, and he does not promote firearm ownership or use.</span> The program prohibits the use of Eddie Eagle mascots anywhere that guns are present. The Eddie Eagle Program has no agenda other than accident prevention -- ensuring that children stay safe should they encounter a gun. The program never mentions the NRA. Nor does it encourage children to buy guns or to become NRA members. The NRA does not receive any appropriations from Congress, nor is it a trade organization. It is not affiliated with any firearm or ammunition manufacturers or with any businesses that deal in guns and ammunition.


Video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIEBrb_wRYc




Press release:

http://www.nra.org/Article.aspx?id=1353


The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program, NRA's groundbreaking gun accident prevention program for children in pre-K through the third grades, has achieved a new milestone, reaching 18 million children in all 50 states, Canada, and Puerto Rico.......

<span style="font-weight: bold">Over the years, the program has been praised by numerous groups and elected officials, including the National Safety Council, the U.S. Department of Justice, and 24 state governors.</span> When the program was formally endorsed by the National Sheriffs' Association in 2002, Sheriff John Cary Bittick, president of the group at the time, said, "We are proud to partner with the National Rifle Association on this very important issue, and we would like to express our full support for this program. The safety of our nation's children is of paramount concern and I can think of no better way to provide them with knowledge about firearm safety than through the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program. This program, which has proven to be most effective, simply teaches children not to touch firearms and to tell adults immediately if they should come into contact with a firearm of any kind."...........
 

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Bluetick said:
Make sure to use the resources sportsmen pay for as well; The Fish and Boat Commission and Game Commission. Both offer staff and resources that span actual hunting, trapping and fishing to the wildlife and ecosystems locally and statewide.

Many of those components can be incorporated into lesson plans that address past, present, and future industry and commerce, ecological concerns, and general conservation practices. Providing the thought that man has a responsibility to save and protect our natural world even as we utilize the resources needed for modern society.

There is a wealth of actual history and results to be learned and even seen to this day in this state where the lack of attention to the natural world were not known or protected. To this day, all citizens are still paying the cost in real money and affects of these legacies.

Conservation rather than "Green or Environmental" lesson plans should be taught. Wise use over no use or seeking road blocks should be stressed. Looking at the effects of the past and how it is impacting the here and now are important.

From acid mine drainage, dams built for expediency out living safety considerations, or how the forestry practices of a century ago still impact humans and wildlife today are all topics of interest and practical learning.


Learning about wildlife is interesting for most students. Adding the facts that sportsmen are responsible for the wide range of wildlife in the US is as important. Just as the restoration efforts of the bald eagle and other threatened wildlife is by the money provided by sportsmen - not animal rights groups.


Frankly, in light of all the gun control and overall gun safety issues in the news of late.... and decades past - there is no reason every school in the state shouldn't be teaching the Eddie Eagle Program as a mandatory class.

As you are in Philly, the history of the city now, past and even the future has and still depends on the natural resources of this state. Everything from clean water, to locally produced food depends on the larger natural world. Even without a totally hunting tilt, exposing the kids to the real aspects of wildlife and the natural world and how sportsmen are an integral part maintaining and restoring that is a great and often ignored message.
Yes, yes, and yes, especially "Conservation rather than "Green or Environmental" lesson plans should be taught." Kids have not been allowed to use their natural environment and find their place in it. They are just taught appreciation and observation from a distance and not their relationship to the natural world and dependence on it and its dependence on them making good use of the resources. I remember trying to take my girls on hikes and it held no meaning for them. As soon as the concept of hunting with all of its attendant goals (tracking, survival, stewardship, responsibility, necessary knowledge of animal behavior) became known to them, it was like a light bulb went off. Now all they want to do is go back country camping, canoeing, identify plants and trees, learn all the ways of the woods. Kids who experience everything just from an observation deck (ie, the trail or the classroom) never get that full experience.
 

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this is just the type of programs our schools need. along with things like the NRA's eddie eagle program and other gun safety classes. the NRA is ready and willing to fund and provide a lot of this stuff but the liberals running our schools don't allow it. i work with scouts and it is amazing how many kids have zero clue about how guns really work. it is this type of education and awareness that will go a long way to stopping school violence.
 

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pumpgun said:
this is just the type of programs our schools need. along with things like the NRA's eddie eagle program and other gun safety classes. the NRA is ready and willing to fund and provide a lot of this stuff but the liberals running our schools don't allow it. i work with scouts and it is amazing how many kids have zero clue about how guns really work. it is this type of education and awareness that will go a long way to stopping school violence.
To be fair, I think people usually just don't understand how many guns there really are floating around the community and they are just hoping at some point they will all go away. They simply don't realize that they are all around them and, for the most part, they are here to stay. The scenario with urban kids who get caught up in messes is often that one kid wants to do something illegal using a gun they barely understand themselves. They pressure a friend to come with them to increase their gumption who often is reluctant. Now, if that reluctant friend knew how to intervene effectively and unload the firearm saying "hey, OK, you want to rob someone, but I don't want anyone to get hurt" you could reduce a lot of the senseless murders than happen in this city. Eddie Eagle is great for younger kids, but for older kids who live in really high-risk environments really showing them how firearms work and how to render them harmless would be a great step. Most of these kids want to do the right thing but they are in environments that make it hard - giving them more confidence would be good. I actually work with an urban peace program and a couple years ago one of the participating police districts gave an Eddie Eagle class for kids which surprised me because those classes never happen here because they are associated with the NRA. I am going to see if I can get more of the classes to happen because it's so important. I talked with a shooting instructor who said he couldn't get anyone from the NRA to come to the city and do it, though, which is unfortunate. I think it needs to start here with people who are known in the community, just like everywhere. One of the women I've worked with in that program lost her little brother in an accidental shooting, and I could tell you countless more tragic stories involving stupid and preventable gun deaths. At this point, people need to set aside the politics and just figure out how to make kids safe. You know the Eddie Eagle program can be taught by anyone, you don't even need to be an NRA member. It might even be free or very low-cost to order the materials.
 

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west Philly, if you camp, check out Hopewell state park.You can spend the summer learning the huntable parts of the park and game land 43. There are several lakes and steams nearby to fish.They also have cabins you can rent. South Birdsboro rod and gun club is nearby for a place to shoot archery and rifle. their dues are very resonable.
 

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sorefoot said:
west Philly, if you camp, check out Hopewell state park.You can spend the summer learning the huntable parts of the park and game land 43. There are several lakes and steams nearby to fish.They also have cabins you can rent. South Birdsboro rod and gun club is nearby for a place to shoot archery and rifle. their dues are very resonable.
I'm guessing you mean French Creek. We do camp a lot, but we have never been camping in French Creek (we usually camp up at the Delaware Water Gap or on private property near Bloomsburg and in Perry County). As chance would have it, though, we have friends who just moved into a house in the park there, probably right where the gun club is, because they said there was a club across the street from their house. They are both interested in learning to hunt, too. We're hoping to spend some time with them soon, but they have their third baby on the way and their other littles are still real little, so they'll be busy for awhile (that was us a few years' ago - I have a 9, 7 and 6 year old). It makes the most sense for us to concentrate our time there, though, since it's so accessible. We have an anniversary coming up - maybe we'll go up and scout around without the kids and get to know the area. Thanks for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This is worthy of a bump.
 

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Sigh, I just spoke with a volunteer at Tinicum today who said that the school across the street that they bring over regularly to learn about the wildlife is closing. They testified vigorously on behalf of having the kids have access to such a great resource on a regular basis, but no dice. It's just not valued enough
. So depressing...
 
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