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Hi all. New to the site and new to varmint hunting. I had some questions on the consumption of groundhog and if there are risks associated with in most in the form of parasites or worms.
I know that rabbits can get wormy over the summer.

Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

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My old neighbor loved them. He said the trick was getting young ones.

Tons of recipes out there for them. I wouldn't be too concerned about worms. Cook it well done if you do have a concern.
 

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Groundhogs are okay to eat and as someone else suggested there are a lot of recipes out there. The major things, IMHO, about preparing them is to understand that skinning a groundhog is not for the feint of heart, and that you must immediately cut out the scent glands. After that it's all up to the cook. I have had some very good, and very bad, groundhog stew both made by my mother....
 

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Bokurkey said:
I wouldn't eat groundhogs if I were you..
Why not? There's nothing wrong with eating groundhogs. I love groundhog pot pie mmmm
 

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HERE YOU GO...ENJOY
my favorite recipe

2 or 3 nice size woodchucks (groundhogs)

Salt and pepper (to taste)
Garlic powder (to taste)
Spices (whatever you like) Meat tenderizer, Italian flavored bread crumbs
3 eggs, milk, and of course some of your favorite oil for frying

Clean and skin the woodchuck, remove all the meat from the bones.

Cut meat into bite size chunks taking care to remove all the fat and glands (tiny round brown bumps)

Sprinkle chunks with meat tenderizer. Mix oil and spices into a bowl, stir well making sure everything is mixed together, add chunks, salt and pepper and garlic powder.

Place lid on bowl and shake well to ensure a fine mixture of ingredients. Place bowl in refrigerator 1 to 3 hours or until chilled.

Pour bread crumbs onto a plate or large bowl, mix eggs and milk in a separate bowl and place next to bread crumbs.

Remove the woodchuck chunks from the oil and spice mixture, dip them into the egg mixture and then place them into the bread crumbs and coat evenly with the bread crumbs.


Pour your favorite oil ( I like peanut oil) into a frying pan or deep fryer, heat to no more than 350 degrees, when the oil is hot enough add the woodchuck chunks and cook until a golden brown or approximately 5 to 10 minutes to ensure they are cooked all the way through.

When the woodchuck chunks are done, remove them from the oil and place on a plate with paper towels to drain off the excess oil.

Great for parties, just don’t tell your friends its woodchuck


Makes approximately 4 servings
 

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jimsdad said:
Groundhogs are okay to eat and as someone else suggested there are a lot of recipes out there. The major things, IMHO, about preparing them is to understand that skinning a groundhog is not for the feint of heart, and that you must immediately cut out the scent glands.
I'll second that! When I was young, we moved to PA from NJ and did the green acres thing. I was a self taught hunter and my dad's #1 rule was eat what you shoot. (I've tempered that rule for my own use since!) I'll never forget that first attempt at skinning and eating a Groundhog. I didn't know about the scent glands but remember to this day my revulsion at the smell of skinning it!
 

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Harvested 3 young ones a few weeks ago, skinned and quarted cooked in butter/olive oil with garlic and onions in a skillet. Seasoned with season all salt . Was very good. First time I tried it. All they eat is grass so not sure where a concern would be.
 

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Killed and ate a ton of groundhogs when I was younger. Breaded and fried, cooked on the grill, pulled "pork", all delicious when properly prepared. Biggest trouble we had was the weather. It's usually downright hot during groundhog season, so cleaning them and getting them cooled down should be a priority. We always stopped hunting them around Labor day. They start feeding heavier in preparation of winter, and get greasier in the process.
 

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My FIL grew up in a family of mountain folk. He had 13 siblings. He said g-hog was a staple in their diet, as it was near just post-depression, and they had very little. He said they would try to seek out the young hogs, as they were the better eating.
 

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i always wear rubber gloves when skinning any animal especially groundhogs. that fat will leave a smell on your hands that is really tough to wash off.
 
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