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So I tried my hand a "mudding" drywall and needless to say it turned out poorly. It truly is an art to get that just right.

Although this is a DIY forum I wondered if anyone could recommend someone in the DuBois area that could finish off a 12X12 (give or take) room for me?
 

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Can't help with finisher .
First rule of spackling is NEVER put on more than you are willing to sand off. Which should be almost none, light first coat and sand lightly,follow by 2 more light coats ,sanding to get hi spots
 

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Get yourself a pole sander and I like to use the mesh to sand, especially if you have a lot to grind down. If it’s really ugly you might want to use a power sander but be prepared for the dust storm.
Once you have it reasonably flat get a large blade and put more mud on it one pass, in one direction. After it’s dried it should be easy to just knock down the roughness.
To finish I always go over with the double sided sanding blocks only pressing lightly.
It’s not hard to finish drywall but it does take practice and patience.
Always seems once you get it down right you don’t do it for a while and end up felling like an amateur again. Good Luck
 

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I just did this at my place, I used a wet rag to smooth the joints out,no dust just drip,
 

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Get a paint mixer for a drill.Mix the joint compound adding water as needed until it is like thick pancake batter.When you get the compound it is too thick without mixing well and usually adding water.It will go on much smoother for you.A 12 inch taping knife for the final coat helps.I don't sand between coats,if there is a hi spot dragging a taping knife down the joint will remove it.
 

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one more thing, when you get the buckets of joint compound home turn them upside down overnight.when you open them in the am or when ever they will be creamy smooth with no mixing.
 

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If you did not final sand, instead of using sandpaper, use a wet sponge. instead of taking mud off, you are smoothing it out. You wont get that crisp look as if you sanded but will look a lot better then what you have. Note: if you sanded to the mesh/paper joint tape, put a additional coat on it.
 

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Birch812 said:
Get yourself a pole sander and I like to use the mesh to sand, especially if you have a lot to grind down. If it’s really ugly you might want to use a power sander but be prepared for the dust storm.
Once you have it reasonably flat get a large blade and put more mud on it one pass, in one direction. After it’s dried it should be easy to just knock down the roughness.
To finish I always go over with the double sided sanding blocks only pressing lightly.
It’s not hard to finish drywall but it does take practice and patience.
Always seems once you get it down right you don’t do it for a while and end up felling like an amateur again. Good Luck
I would advise against a belt sander, unless there's an inch of mud on the wall it's unneeded, all he'll end up doing is sanding down to tape and having to re mud it.

Since i can't see how it looks, if it seems that when you mud your edges are really built up its a simple fix. All you have to do is feather the mud while applying it, I do this by only using 12" blade and reaching into the pan and getting the mud, scrape the sides off, and hen as you apply the mud to the wall, keep a finger on both sides of the blade wih pressure and that will get rid of the edges.
 

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Did 3 rooms last winter. It was an old post and beam farm house with crooked walls, etc. Managed to get it pretty good in two rooms. One room just had too many uneven joints. The mudding job, was done to the best of my ability. Looked like crap, but surprisingly, when painted, many of the flaws disappeared. There is definitely something about the contrast between mud and dry wall that makes it look worse before paint.
 

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It ain't rocket science and you have gotten a bunch of really good ideas and recommendations here. Keep after it on your own and you will be amazed at how easy it is to get the hang of it. If you are using paper tape switch to self sticking fiberglass; keep the mud mixed; wipe off with a wet sponge to reduce sanding; take your time; let things dry before going back at it. And - you ain't working on an episode of This Old House so don't expect to do as they do (tape, cut, slap, sand and paint all in a day).
I used to dread sheet rock finishing and after doing it a couple of times I now actually look forward to it as something I can handle easily.

:thumbs:
 

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As stated previously, use as much mud as you would like to sand off. I just finished remodeling my entire house, new drywall in bathrooms and kitchen. First room to get drywall was the master bath. Never having finished drywall before I found myself doing everything wrong, adding too much mud and sanding between every coat. The entire process took way too long just to finish mudding a bathroom. After I had my relative come in and show me how to do it correctly, the other 2 rooms were a breeze.
 
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