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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend bought a Traditions Deerhunter 50 cal flintlock back in Febuary. The other day we took it out for the first time and the gun got spark 2 out of 15 times. Needless to say we were fustrated. I've been around flintlock muzzleloaders sence i was 12 and i know it shouldn't take 6 flints to make it go off. The frizzen had a deep gouge in the center of it{makes no sence to me}. I myself own two flintlocks the one is a Thompson center Hawken and the other is a 50 cal Austin & Hallek fancy flint and neither have the same problems. If any one owns one of these and has the same problem let me know cuze this is driving me crazy.
 

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A buddy of mine had a problem with his, I think it is a traditions but I gotta find out to be sure. I know he got frustrated with it and now it sits collecting dust.
 

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dances with buck said:
My friend bought a Traditions Deerhunter 50 cal flintlock back in Febuary. I myself own two flintlocks the one is a Thompson center Hawken and the other is a 50 cal Austin & Hallek fancy flint and neither have the same problems.

Cheap vs quality.

Hope everything works out.
 

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Hard to say without actually seeing it. Could be a soft frizzen, could easily be the flints. Generally, a hard steel frizzen does better with an English flint. TC's for years used mild steel frizzens that were case hardened and the cut agate flints worked better with them. If it is the frizzen, there is an easy cure, either a new one, of half soling. I've half soled a couple frizzens over the years and that is a traditional way to fix mild steel frizzens. Half soling is fastening a very thin carbon steel veneer to the frizzen face. Old fashioned wind up clock spring was very good for this. Take the frizzen off, rough the face with some heavy grit 40 or 60, and cut a thin piece of clock spring about the same size as the frizzen. rough up the outer curve side and then use epoxy as a glue to hold the spring stock to the frizzen. Use3 a c-clapm to hold it in place for 36 to 48 hours and then carefully using slow speed so you don't heat the srping stock grind away the edges that stick out. I've done this with some old cheapo repro frizzens and even some older TC frizzens and it works better than new. (My brother still hunts with one)
 

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I don't have a traditions, but my father does. In his gun, and in my renegades, we get the best spark from knapped english flints. I've tried others in my guns and this is all I use after having unreliable ignition from others. Give it a try and let us know how it works.
 

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Dances, I think Zimmer has it right. It sounds like a thin, case hardened frizzen if it was easily gouged. His recipe of fixing it sound workable (but, beyond my talents). I think I would opt for a new frizzen. If it won't spark, you're wizzing in the wind.

Try Zimmer's suggestion, however, it would certainly be rewarding to know you personally solved the problem. Good luck!
 

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Try a Lyman frizzen and black english flints.
 

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i second the lyman frizzen.i would take it back and get a lyman or tc if possible.you shouldn't have to fix a brand new gun imo
 

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Traditions has been mfg the Deerhunter line for many years with minimal complaints from folks just entering the wonderful flintlock arena.. My read on this is that the factory supplied soft composite "el crapo flint" is the problem. TC's & others out of the factory box also dont use a good German Agate or english flint providing optimum spark.

If it were me...get a good german agate or english flint & i think it will go BOOM many more times then not!


If the above aint the answer...call Traditions since gun is still under warranty. A clip from Traditions Warranty Q&A Page:

How long is the Traditions warranty on Muzzleloaders?
Muzzleloading Rifles, Shotguns, side-lock pistols and single-shot pistols carry a Limited Lifetime Mechanical Warranty
 

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TATERDAVID said:
he said he tried 6 flints
Amen...i can read my friend too.
Please reread my post regarding what flints are best. 6 pieces of crap=6 pieces of crap assumin same replacements used. Just a thought.
 

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i suppose, but i doubt he had 6 factory flints since he said he was a expierienced flinter.my lyman even with the factory provided flint has never not gone boom.

we're all trying to help and sounds like between the flint and the frizzen is the problem.he changed flints and that didn't work so kinda leads us to the frizzen area as our next concern, imo.course could be weak springs but since he said he was expierienced i'm leaning toward a bad frizzen
 

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Run a file across the frizzen. If it bites; it's too soft. I'm guessing its too soft because you have a gouge on just a couple of runs.

I don't work with these guns so I don't know if a lyman frizzen will work or not. Seems the lyman is going to be too big for it.

There is a product called kasenit that I use to harden frizzens. If you're proficient with a torch and not colorblind; you can harden that frizzen in about 15 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We put English flints in the gun and it still gouges the frizen real bad.
 

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Then it is definitely a too soft or too mild frizzen. A new one is the easiest, half soling next easy and case hardening it your self is the next. There is a commercial case hardening preparation called Kasenit, which works great, pretty much easy to use. A second method is to wrap the frizzen in old scrap leather wind it tight with wire and then coat the thing with clay (soil clay) throw the whole ball in a really hot camp fire and let it there over night and let it cool in the ashes overnight. Something about the smoking leather and red hot frizzen lets the metal absorb some carbon. Dixie Gun works describes how to do this in the back of the catelogue, in the reference section.

Your problem sounds unusual for a Traditions. They have some quality control problems, but I didn't think the frizzen hardening was a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The first thing I'll do is take it back to cooperstown where
my friend bought the gun and see what he says.
 

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Cooperstown is where we used to get our t/c frizzens "re soled" back in the 70's and early 80's. I doubt they still do it, but I'm sure they can help you with the situation.
 
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