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I'm hoping someone can answer this. I was at New Cumberland Boro park yesterday. A young women who live next to the park (I saw her go back to her house) had her dog out. The dog jump in the water and was chasing the geese and gosling around. After a little while the dog got out of the water and ran down the bank. The women then sic'ed the dog on the geese telling it to go get the ducky's.Im quite sure that it illegal to have your dog intentionally attack water fowl. Is it?
 

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Well I do not know if it is legal but I can tell you that where I work there was a woman who was under contract with our maintainance group to bring her band of Boarder Collies ( I think she had 3- maybe 4) to the grounds once a week and have the dogs chase the geese. It was a hoot to watch as the dogs wanted to naturally heard the geese into a group and the geese were opposed to this which resulted in A - the geese got the idea that they needed to hang out somewhere else B - a tremendous reduction in goos poop littering the sidewalks C - the dogs getting a ton of exercise D - us employees pressing our noses against every available window whenever the lady and her pack showed up. It was a real show and the entertainment value was outstanding. I have not seen the lady and her band of merry K-9's in quites some time and I miss them.
 

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did you contact anyone other then this site, like the law?Is there a leash law in that boro? I can't see where harassing baby geese is keeping the pop down, since they can't fly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Im checking with the local PD about the leash law. She wasn't contracted by anyone that's for sure. I thought it was pretty rude to have the dog attack the gosling.
 

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Unless she was a licensed Nuisance Wildlife control Operator, she can not chase the geese with dogs or anything else for that matter. Even those licensed to do so may not cahse with dogs when gosslings are present or when the birds are flightless.
 

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We have a big issue with geese on the main lake where I live.They're an absolute nightmare.There used to be so much goose crap on the shore and in the paygrounds,you couldn't even take your kids down to play.Almost every summer the beeches would get shut down because the fecal count was so high in the water.I was on a wildlife management committee and we were tasked with solving the problem.Messing with the geese presents some problems because their regulated by the fed gov.People do in fact have trained dogs that harass them but there are certain restrictions and guidelines.We tried everything except the dogs.We spent a bunch of money on chemicals that were applied to the grass.When the geese grazed,they'd get sick and supposedly fly somewhere else.Unfortunately,it didn't work.Geese won't step over anything when they leave the water so we built small barriers that they'd have to step over.That worked pretty well but it's not perfect.

Until you have to deal with ridiculous geese numbers,it's hard to imagine how bad it can get.If I had my way,I'd have killed every last one on sight.I certainly wouldn't have an issue with a neighbor letting her dog harass them.
 

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dce. just think how much is in our drinking water. have you rode out past the resivior lately and seen how many geese are out there?
 

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People used to feed them when they dropped in to feed on the way back to Canada.Now they know they don't have to fly that far to breed.Any born here will return because they don't even know Canada exists.Mankind "helped" another animal by feeding it.What needs done is a spring goose season to get the adults before they breed.How do you know which geese are headed to Canada of just going to another feeding area though?
 

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Feeding has nothing to do wth resident geese, they are the offspring of birds that were released at places like Middlecreek and Pymatuning to start resident flocks. They have spread all over the state and they do not migrate to Canada, although they do cross state lines and back. When the populations got too large they used to be rounded up and given to other states who now also have a rsident goose problem. The resident goose seasons are set to exclude migrating birds.
 

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I have to agree with dce. Those who have never had to deal with the nasty vermin would never understand. There needs to be a bounty on them. Goose season should run concurrent with crow season.
 

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I agree with that and it's precisely why I never did what I felt like doing.I gotta say though,if I had to deal with that nightmare on my own property,my opinion may differ.I doubt I'd start offing them but I propably wouldn't be opposed to letting Sparky defend his territory.
 

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There are legal ways to reduce resident geese on your property. You don't even need a written permit any more to addle eggs in the nests, all you have to do is call the F&W service and register or go on line and do it. The USDA wildlife services can also be of assistance and they have officers accross the state, there is one at Summerdale.

§ 147.746. Exceptions for resident Canada geese.
(a) Egg addling and nest destruction. Private landowners and managers of public lands and their employees or agents may destroy the nests and eggs of resident Canada geese on lands under their jurisdiction when necessary to resolve or prevent injury to people or damage to property or agricultural crops between March 1 and June 30 without the need for a joint state/Federal permit when the following conditions have been met:

(1) Private landowners or managers of public land have registered with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service at http://www.fws.gov/permits/mbpermits/gooseeggregistration.html . Each person who will be conducting the activity shall be registered at this site prior to implementing control activities.

(i) Eggs may be addled by shaking, freezing with CO2 or oiling. If addled by oil, only 100% corn oil may be use.

(ii) Nests and eggs may be disposed of by burying or burning.

(2) Persons exercising privileges authorized by this subchapter shall file a report with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service at www.fws.gov/permits/mbpermits/gooseeggregistration.html no later than October 31 of each year. Failure to file a report may result in the denial of permission to addle the eggs or destroy the nests of resident Canada geese in subsequent years.

(3) It shall be unlawful to interfere with the nest or eggs of resident Canada geese without first registering with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service as required by this subchapter.

For other methods:

§ 147.744. Depredation permits for migratory waterfowl.
(a) A depredation permit issued by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to an applicant may be co-signed by the Commission when the following criteria are met:

(1) Subsequent to a complaint, the site has been visited by a WCO to verify that a problem exists. A Commission waterfowl complaint form will be furnished to the Commission by the WCO. A copy of the Federal depredation permit application will be furnished to the complainant by the WCO.

(2) The applicant has demonstrated the site is open to hunting and hunting has been ineffective or hunting is impractical.

(3) The applicant shall demonstrate that reasonable nonlethal control methods have been attempted. Nonlethal control methods shall include the following:

(i) Feeding of waterfowl is prohibited. The applicant shall address this issue and include evidence of the enforcement of a ‘‘no feeding’’ policy.

(ii) Exclusion and harassment measures (fencing, repellents, scare devices, and the like).

(iii) Habitat manipulation (eliminate feeding areas, resting and breeding habitat).

(b) The following control methods are approved for population reduction and will be specifically identified in the depredation permit:

(1) Oiling, addling or freezing of eggs.

(2) Shooting may be used to reinforce nonlethal measures according to the following guidelines:

(i) The permit will specify the number of birds to be shot with no more than 10% of the nuisance flock to be killed except on airports covered by Airport Safety Control permits issued by the Commission.

(ii) Waterfowl may only be taken with shotgun using nontoxic shot no larger than size T.

(iii) The use of blinds, bait, decoys and calls is prohibited.

(3) Depopulation of waterfowl by the applicant, its employees, wildlife control agents, WS or authorized Federal or State wildlife agency personnel will be specified in the permit under the following guidelines:

(i) The number of birds to be killed may not exceed that specified in the permit.

(ii) Killing will be conducted only by persons specified in the permit by shooting with shotguns using nontoxic shot no larger than size T, or capturing birds and euthanasia by chemical or mechanical devices approved for use by the Executive Director or a designee.

(c) Waterfowl carcasses taken under depredation permits will be used according to the following guidelines:

(1) Care will be taken to preserve carcasses for human consumption and shall be made available to food banks or others specified in the permit. Birds euthanized by chemical means will not be utilized for human consumption.

(2) When the condition of the birds is unsuitable for human consumption or food banks, or individuals are not available to accept carcasses, the birds may be disposed of in a sanitary method by burying, incineration or depositing in approved landfills or refuse facilities.



Cross References

This section cited in 58 Pa. Code § 147.746 (relating to exceptions for resident Canada geese).
 

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New Cumberland boro park along the Yellow Breeches, has had major resident goose problems for many years. It's why they banned the feeding of geese in the park some time ago.

When boro council banned feeding in the park, lots of "little old ladies" showed up at council meetings to complain, because they enjoyed going down there to throw bread at the little dears.

Haven't been in there for some time, but doubt the feeding of geese solved all their problems? My grandsons played little league baseball there about 6 to 8 years ago and I know much of the park next to the creek, was an incredible mess from geese back then.
 

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John S said:
(i) Eggs may be addled by shaking, freezing with CO2 or oiling. If addled by oil, only 100% corn oil may be use.
They're pretty good addled with butter if you get them right after they're laid and before she starts sitting.
 

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I don't know about any of you guys, but the last thing I want to do it try and steal goose eggs from a nest. The mothers can be downright nasty. I got bit by one when I was a kid, and never want to have that happen again.
 

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dce said:
We have a big issue with geese on the main lake where I live.They're an absolute nightmare.There used to be so much goose crap on the shore and in the paygrounds,you couldn't even take your kids down to play.Almost every summer the beeches would get shut down because the fecal count was so high in the water.I was on a wildlife management committee and we were tasked with solving the problem.Messing with the geese presents some problems because their regulated by the fed gov.People do in fact have trained dogs that harass them but there are certain restrictions and guidelines.We tried everything except the dogs.We spent a bunch of money on chemicals that were applied to the grass.When the geese grazed,they'd get sick and supposedly fly somewhere else.Unfortunately,it didn't work.Geese won't step over anything when they leave the water so we built small barriers that they'd have to step over.That worked pretty well but it's not perfect.

Until you have to deal with ridiculous geese numbers,it's hard to imagine how bad it can get.If I had my way,I'd have killed every last one on sight.I certainly wouldn't have an issue with a neighbor letting her dog harass them.
I'll second that, It wasn't that bad when my kids were little but we went down last year or the year before and it was nasty.
 
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