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I'm just wondering since I;ll be on the market for a scope for a rifle, do you really get what you pay for?? I dont really get the difference in a thousand dollar scope vs a scope that costs 1/10th that.... Just wondering what the real difference is?

Thanks

Ryan.
 

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There is nothing more important than the optics. The general rule used by gun nuts everywhere is the scope should cost as much as the gun. Do you really need premium optics for a few days hunting in PA? No, but if you are putting serious dough into a rifle you will use for years, and you can afford it, buy premium glass, you will never be sorry.
 

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yep. Buy a Leupold VX II or better and don't look back. Cabela's had them on sale but I'm not sure what their availabilty is now. Lifetime warranty and made in America instead of overseas. Check the local classified sites and you'll occasionally find a good one at a fair price. You can always send it back for a "check-up" free of charge if you have any concerns.

Mark
 

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While the high dollar scopes are good you pay a lot for the name alone, just like HD. I looked at a $500 Swarovski about a week ago and was not impressed. Saw no difference between it and scopes in the $150 -200 price range.
 

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Shock absorbtion and accuracy of adjustment are a big thing that a lot of guys overlook. Yes, that low end scope will do a lot of the same things that a high end scope will do on a 100 yard range off of a rest. Get to running around the woods and bump your gun? You may be sorry. Those clicks might move the point of impact 3/8 of an inch instead of 1/4 or even be 1/16th or less off at 100 yards on a low end scope, not a big deal right? At longer distances those little differences will show up in a big way. IMO you should not have to "tap" your scope to seat your adjustment. Add harder wear and tear and again, you will see the difference sooner or later. If its not something that you are worried about then dont worry about it, but be prepared for the end result when you buy a lower end optic. As was stated above, pay the money and you will only cry once.

Best choices for top end would be Leupold or Nightforce. Best low end, I give it to Redfield.
To each his own, my story and I stick to it like glue!


A lot of what should determine how much you pay is just how picky you are about your accuracy. If you are happy with 1.5" groups at 100, then ok. If you, your gun and your ammo have the ability to do much better and you want it to do much better, then you owe it to yourself to spend the money.
 

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I have a Nikon Buckmaster. I got it new 5 years ago for around $200...great scope. No need for $1000 scope for 2 weeks of deer season in PA
 

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Discussion Starter #8
GobbleBuck said:
Shock absorbtion and accuracy of adjustment are a big thing that a lot of guys overlook. Yes, that low end scope will do a lot of the same things that a high end scope will do on a 100 yard range off of a rest. Get to running around the woods and bump your gun? You may be sorry. Those clicks might move the point of impact 3/8 of an inch instead of 1/4 or even be 1/16th or less off at 100 yards on a low end scope, not a big deal right? At longer distances those little differences will show up in a big way. IMO you should not have to "tap" your scope to seat your adjustment. Add harder wear and tear and again, you will see the difference sooner or later. If its not something that you are worried about then dont worry about it, but be prepared for the end result when you buy a lower end optic. As was stated above, pay the money and you will only cry once.

Best choices for top end would be Leupold or Nightforce. Best low end, I give it to Redfield.
To each his own, my story and I stick to it like glue!


A lot of what should determine how much you pay is just how picky you are about your accuracy. If you are happy with 1.5" groups at 100, then ok. If you, your gun and your ammo have the ability to do much better and you want it to do much better, then you owe it to yourself to spend the money.
After reading this I see a lot more of the things I need to consider, On a side note, What makes Leupold what everyone seems to get all dreamy eyed about?? My neighbor has a leupold and a Swift and I think the swift may be clearer than the Leupold? I dont know really, thats more of why I asked....

Thanks for the input guys.

Ryan.
 

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Stetam said:
While the high dollar scopes are good you pay a lot for the name alone, just like HD. I looked at a $500 Swarovski about a week ago and was not impressed. Saw no difference between it and scopes in the $150 -200 price range.
I'm going to have to call you out on this one, One for thinking a Swaro doesn't look any better than a $150 scope and two for thinking HD isn't better than standard resolution. I didn’t know Swaro even made a $500 scope, It sounds to me like you never compared them to begin with and you certainly have never compared HD to standard resolution, whether it was television or a HD Spotting scope to one that isn’t HD.

To the OP, yes you do get what you pay for, do you need a $1,000 or more scope to hunt with, absolutely not, is it better than a $150 scope, you bet, in more ways than one, glass, reliability, durability, tracking, clarity, and the amount of light it lets in for those early morning or late evening shots. Once you spend the money on good optics you’ll never ever buy cheap again, well maybe once more, but you’ll find it was a mistake.

I like Leupold a lot and I have a few, you can't go wrong with a VXII, the VXIII are nicer and if you have the money go for the VXIII you won't regret it.
 

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I have been using Swift for several years and several rifles now, It works for me and they have a guarantee, take it back , even trade, no questions asked.and they sell for around $100.
 

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What you are getting in a higher end scope is better glass and more precise internal adjustments. The glass is key, different qualities of glass, different coating, number of coatings, coated on both sides of the lenses. All these help with the clarity and light gathering abilities. Very similar to comparing a rear projection TV to a HD -TV, the picture will have better clarity and the color"s will "pop". I have good luck with Leupold VXII, VXIII, and Nikon Monarch's. I think one of the best values right now is the Redfield line up (owned by Leupold). Buy as much quality as you can afford, you will not regret it.

Good Luck,
Valk
 

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Gunnermhr said:
Stetam said:
While the high dollar scopes are good you pay a lot for the name alone, just like HD. I looked at a $500 Swarovski about a week ago and was not impressed. Saw no difference between it and scopes in the $150 -200 price range.
I'm going to have to call you out on this one, One for thinking a Swaro doesn't look any better than a $150 scope and two for thinking HD isn't better than standard resolution. I didn’t know Swaro even made a $500 scope, It sounds to me like you never compared them to begin with and you certainly have never compared HD to standard resolution, whether it was television or a HD Spotting scope to one that isn’t HD.

To the OP, yes you do get what you pay for, do you need a $1,000 or more scope to hunt with, absolutely not, is it better than a $150 scope, you bet, in more ways than one, glass, reliability, durability, tracking, clarity, and the amount of light it lets in for those early morning or late evening shots. Once you spend the money on good optics you’ll never ever buy cheap again, well maybe once more, but you’ll find it was a mistake.

I like Leupold a lot and I have a few, you can't go wrong with a VXII, the VXIII are nicer and if you have the money go for the VXIII you won't regret it.
Uh...I have a Redfield, did look at the $500 Swaro which wasn't any better than the Redfield, which by the way cost me $140 and has just as good optics(if not better) and has a lifetime warrenty...sorry if it hurts your feelings so don't say I never compared them.

For HD I was refering to Harley Davidson. Thats a motorcycle.
 

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Ultimately it depends on how much hunting and what type of hunting you are doing. When you purchase a cheap scope it may do you just fine from about 30 minutes after dawn till about 30 minutes till the end of legal shooting hours. Also if you use it on a light kicking rifle and do only stand hunting then you might end up being okay. It is when you start to go above and beyond this type of hunting that the extra money put into a scope pays for itself. Reliability and light transmission are where you gain as you begin to pay more and more for a scope. Leupold is a great compromise for reliability, light transmission, and warranty/customer service. There are so many out there that swear by their cheaper optics and they have accounted for many game animals. There is nothing wrong with that, ultimately you have to be confident in your equipment. I personally am confident with Leupold's and the Nikon Monarch's and even the Bushnell Elites. I am even more confident in the Swarovski's, Leica's, and the higher end Zeiss optics. In a real hunting situation, not looking through them at the counter of the sporting goods store, is where you will see the better glass in these higher end european scopes. I hunt many days in the field in Pennsylvania and in other states. I pay quite a bit of money and invest a lot of time in some of the hunting trips that I take. Just this year I had to make a fading light shot with 2 minutes left of legal shooting light on a great mule deer from just over 200 yards. I personally don't think that I would have been able to make that shot with a lower end scope. My thought process has always been that I don't want to be faced with the animal of a lifetime in fading light and not be able to take an ethical shot. I don't want to be faced with the possibility of bumping my rifle and it losing its zero on me.

I can't stress it enough that you have to be confident in your equipment. Regardless of what others tell you about stuff you have to be confident in what you have. Regardless of what scope you choose, whether it be a lower end scope or all the way up to a Swarovski or Leica, you have to be confident in your equipment. If you can only hunt maybe 3-4 days out of the rifle season then there is a good chance that you really don't need that top end scope as it might not be worth it to you. You really just need to do some research and pick the optic that you feel confident in. There are so many options out there and what may work for one person might not be ideal for another. That's why I really like to talk optics with all of my customers to get a good feeling on what might work the best for each individual person. Good luck!

On a side note, where in the world do they sell $500 Swarovski's at? New or Used?

Mac
 

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Cheap optics frequently means cheap internal materials and construction; i.e., lens not properly coated, erector tube has poor springs, glued in prisms, mass production errors, internal fogging, etc. Scope quality is just as important as rifle quality. By all means, check the warranty before you buy anything: Leupold is one of the very best. Looking thru a scope does not tell you anything about internal quality.

Some years ago in a gun shop, I asked the owner why no Simmons scopes on display. His response: "We don't stock them anymore; had to send too many back."
 

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clarity at higher power is noticeably better in higher end scopes. i have never even looked through a scope that cost more than $500 though so maybe there is some sort of magic about the really good ones. my experience has with lower end simmons/tasco/bushnell to mid range leupold/nikon/bushnell.

if i was setting up a gun for varmint, i would spend the most i could afford.
 

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Listen pointer,would you put recaps on a corvette?Like i said in another reply,you only cry once.If someone says you don,t need that expensive scope,agree with them and say your right,i don,t need it i deserve it.Like the Germans say,Just For Nice.Go really crazy and buy yourself a Schmidt&Bender.Buy 2 and send me one,LOL
 

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It's amazing how easy it is to tell someone on these forums how, and what, to spend their money on. I don't know how anyone walks into the woods to hunt with any less than $5000 of equipment on their shoulder and expects to kill something...
 

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last I checked the Leupolds VXII 3 x 9 x 40 was running $239 at Cabela's. Couple that with a $20 coupon for spending more than $150 and if you talk nice they'll likely add free shipping. I'm condifent in saying this scope provides a great deal of piece of mind when hunting Penn's Woods and will keep you just under the $5,000 threshold carried by most others.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The only problem is, I need a lot more magnification lol....

out of curiosity are Barska's junk then, orrrr???

Ryan.
 
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