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Discussion Starter #1
Do you load fresh ones? How long do you keep the ones you have loaded? Would you trust them for the next season?
 

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I do, but only because I use the older ones to practice and site in and then backfill with new ones right before the opener. I would definitely trust the ones from last year.....or several years ago.
 

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I shoot what I have reloaded, whether they were from this year, last year or several years ago.

Why would you not trust rounds you loaded?
 

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I'm the same way....I make sure going into a season that I have 30 loaded rounds for any rifle I intend to hunt with.

I clearly will not use all that, and I'll use that to shoot the following year to at least verify the rifle again, and refill whatever I used.
 

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All of the rifles that I currently use, I have established loads for. I only load from year to year what I think I will use. Whatever leftovers there are get shot up in practice.
So I guess I do load fresh shells every year, but it's not by design because I'm afraid to shoot older ones.
I used to keep hundreds of loaded rounds on hand but I just don't have time to do that anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use to load up stock of what worked for my guns.I put a date, for which rifle and the load data.
I decided to take my Rem-700-308,for a walk in the woods.I had a box and a half of shells, I loaded up 10,to round off a box. I took the 5 fresh ones out of the box and went to the range and these shot right on.I shot a 5 shot group and put the other 5 into the box and went home. The 5 fresh ones had a little shine to them.
Went on a hunt the first Saturday of the 2012 season.Sat on a ridge were they had taken some timber from in the hollow.I saw a really good buck crossing in front of me at 75 plus yards. Wait! Wait! And then a good shot. Bang!!! It didn't jump nor run? It just kept walking. I fired 2 more and it never ran ,just walked away. The last shot i saw a puff of leaves under him!
Now that ruined my day,so i went home. The next day,Sunday,i took the gun to the range to try to see what happened.Maybe scope died or screws came loose. The gun is still fouled from the day before. I load up 3 of the old shells,from a loading of 2 years before.
I'll shorten this up.
They missed the paper,put in fresh loads and these were dead on. It was the old shells. Took all fresh ones ,the last day of buck,same spot,dead buck,one shot. Never saved shells from then on? Turns out it is or was something called "Cold Welding".
 

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What I have found is that over time, bullets tighten up in case necks. Try pulling bullets that were loaded year or more ago, you will find out. Overly tight bullets increase pressure and will change your POI.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Stoolshooter,that's what i am saying,but,you know we will be told we are doing some thing wrong.
I had some so tight i had to push them loose with my press before they would come out with a hammer puller!!!!
So,i would never trust saving or stock piling loads.
 

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stoolshooter said:
What I have found is that over time, bullets tighten up in case necks. Try pulling bullets that were loaded year or more ago, you will find out. Overly tight bullets increase pressure and will change your POI.
To stoolshooters point -brass can harden over time. At manufacture the case necks are annealed at the factory to prevent gas leaks and to hold the bullet over time.Many in the competition arena are aware the problem with splitting case necks. Norma, on their website, states that this annealing should hold the bullet tight in the case " for at least 10 years". Next time you shoot some vintage brass, look closer at the fired case necks.... there is a good chance that you will find upon close inspection that the necks have split. Research conducted many years ago at the Frankfort Arsenal concluded that oxides of nitrogen are formed during the aging of smokeless powder which may cause season cracking of the brass.
One of the first things learned in Benchrest competition is neck tension (amount of bullet hold) matters.
Add to the season cracking problem, cold welding of the bullet to the brass is another problem that can happen overtime.
So yes, shooting freshly reloaded cartridges is a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
WOL,If you hand load and feel that this may happen to your loads,just don't load up 100 of them and then store them for a few years.
It is not a proven fact that it happen all the time?
 

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Don't worry, I would never have the patience to load 100 rounds.
I usually load 10 at a time before I head to the range. I shoot those 10. Then I reload 10 more. This is for my 300 Weatherby. For my lighter rifles, I may load more or even use factory ammo. If I'm just plinking, cheap factory 30-06 rounds or handloads with cheap bullets, don't break the bank. Even handloaded 300 Weatherby rounds are sucking up 88 grains of RL22 a shot.
 

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I took a little buck two years ago with a Nos bt that was loaded..... I have no idea when... Worked fine. Found them on the shelf and I used to get Nos BT's factory second from a buddy who lived near the plant in OR. He moved 15 years ago???

Taking the kids to matches I dont even start unless I am going to do 100. I use a two single stage presses, a Lee priming tool and a electronic powder measure. I have a system and I can rip out 100 match grade in no time with each one weighed.

That reminds me, tomorrow should be a 223 night
 
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