The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right now I've got broadheads with removable blades. I'd like to be able to resharpen them easily after tuning or practicing. I think I need a tool that holds a razorblade at a specific angle while you drag the blade. Mostly looking on Amazon, can't find anything.

I'm also wide open to suggestions. Not looking to get a new hobby, burning hours and hours for perfection; just want to keep my gear in good working order.

Next year I'm going to try some 1 piece 3-blade broadheads, like VPA. It appears you can just use a flat whetstone for them.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
I made a jig to hold a Dremel with the 1" grinding wheel, a couple screws for guides, and a blade holder from two pieces of flat aluminum. It's straight out of Rube Goldberg, but it does the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
Thanks flintlock. Looks like you move the aluminum blade holder back and forth by hand to sharpen the blade. Correct?

You work right to left using the bolt as a quide, and the top of the angle aluminum as a steady rest. Very light pressure, flip over and repeat untill it shaves.

Puts a different angle on the edge, so the first time takes a little time, but easy after that. The only problem is being careful not to cut yourself checking sharpness!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
Almost sounds like you created an ice skate sharpener, for broadheads.

I've never seen an ice skate sharpener, but if you could get the angle right I bet it would work out fine. The jig I put together isn't very difficult to do, just a piece of two inch aluminum angle drilled and tapped to accept the Dremel and keep it in place. The holder is the same basic idea that's used with the Smith's Sharpening system to hold the knife blade securely, bottom screw stationary, the other two to tighten things so the don't move.

You use the top "rail" of the angle to steady the holder while sharpening, and the bolt gives a reference to make sure the angle remains what you want. This should clarify what you see in the pictures. Hope this gives you some ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,635 Posts
Next year I'm going to try some 1 piece 3-blade broadheads, like VPA. It appears you can just use a flat whetstone for them.

Thanks
The Montec G-5s are similar. Very easy to sharpen. Lay them on the stone and go for it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: flintlock hunter

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,140 Posts
Any videos of these products in use? I shoot each arrow and then sharpen each broadhead. I shoot fixed blade heads mostly muzzys, but a few others as well. I sharpen using stones, sandpaper, and some with a regular sharpening block. Some of these tools look like they could make my life easier. I work on them till they are sharp. The worst were two ramcat heads that I sharpened, Probably took me 20 minutes per head, but I am particular. I like that set up flintlock hunter posted. One question do you use a finer wheel than that or always one that course. I have noticed that when I use a course stone it almost make them rip as they cut. I thought that may make for better blood. When I use to shoot the old bear heads I used a checkering file to serate the blades, this really tore and cut deer , and made some good blood trails when it cut across the grain of meat. However when the blade hit and kind of wedged between the grain of meat the blood trail was not as good. These were a two blade, as I did not use the small bleeder blades. I like that set up just, would like to see it in operation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
In answer to the question on stone grit, that's the only one I use. Just very light , multiple passes untill it's a machined sharp edge. You need to be careful with it, since it will cut you very easily. And yes, I have experienced better blood, and shorter tracks than factory edges.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top