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Re: 2014

My. Brittany ran with a spinone during a leg of his junior hunt test. Seemed to run circles around that dog, but he found his birds. That spinone hunted well. When he wasn't hunting, he was sacked out. Cool dog.! g
 

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Re: 2014

I have trained a few over the last few years and I have not been impressed with any as a bird dog. I am not sure of the breeding and where they came from, but most were average at best in regards to finding birds and a few were very below average to poor in regards to ability and bird desire.

Most were still being used in both the field and showed in the ring and most of the breeders wanted them to be worked in NAVHDA and to get their Natural Ability as a minimum. Several had issues just trying to complete the NA by the time they were 18 months old.

I am not sure how they are on shedding, but I know they are a mess with burrs and things that stick to them. The beard can also be dirty and stinky when eating and drinking because they dip it in whatever they are eating or drinking.

This is just an overview of what I have experienced and I am sure there are fine dogs out there if you can find the right breedings. I would do my research on breeders if you do decide to go in this direction.

Anytime you deal with non-common breeds, you deal with more issues of ability and hunt. You also typically pay a more premium price because of their rarity. For me, I don't like to pay more for half and that is what you get at times with many of these breeds. I am a big believer in staying with traditiions bird dogs if you want a bird dog. They are better prepared to do the job and typically cost less.

Regardless of what you do, research the breeder and good luck in finding the right pup.

Just my take on what I have seen
 

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Re: 2014

Just IMHO and through photos, if you want a good bird dog and couch buddy a setter is the way to go:


 

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Re: 2014

I've seen several at hunt tests back when I was doing that. Not a single one seemed to have the fire in the belly that I want to see in a bird dog. They were big, slow, and unmotivated. This opinion is based on seeing only a half dozen or so but each one was that was braced with a dog of another breed had the other dog run rings around them.
 

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Re: 2014

Actually the slowness of their pace would be a serious con as far as I'm concerned, but that's a matter of personal preference. The thing I think that would be considered a con in most people's eyes was their very obvious lack of desire and prey drive, but that may have just been the half dozen dogs I saw. Perhaps there are better ones out there to be found.

From the book Pointing Dogs Volume One, The Continentals, author Craig Koshyk states, "For people who prefer smaller dogs with a lot of zip, the laid-back personality and all-day pace may not be their cup of tea. And the Spinone's size can pretty much eliminate it from the list of anyone living in a small home or driving a compact car. But for hunters who can appreciate the breed's looks, working style, and personality, a Spinone from proven working lines can make a terrific hunting partner.

He lists the pros of the breed as Very Good to excellent water workers, Strong point, natural retrieve, dynamic parent club run mainly by hunters for hunters, and strong commitment to NAVHDA among North American Breeders. Cons are listed as, Some can be quite large, too slow and or close working for some, can be droolers and sloppy drinkers, rare, but potentially fatal health issues.

This, by the way, is a great book for anyone interested in the continental pointing breeds. It has a chapter on every continental pointing breed in existence, some of which are very rare. The guy who wrote it is a professional photographer and it has thousands of spectacular photos. You can order a copy on line at www.dogwilling.ca.

Full disclosure, the author is a friend of mine and my shorthair is pictured on page 227 and the guy walking off into the Saskatchewan sunset on page 351 is yours truly. But those two things aside, it is a great book which took 12 years to write.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Re: 2014

Actually the slowness of their pace would be a serious con as far as I'm concerned.

That is not a con that is something they intially breed in to the dogs.
 

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Re: 2014

A couple of blocks down the road from us is a Spinone. It is NOT hunted and is just a house dog. It is not friendly around other dogs, to me it is to aggresive and I wont let my dogs near it. They dont think it is a problem, they think it is "funny". It is always barking and tearing stuff up in there yard. It may be an anomoly but it is not a nice dog at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Re: 2014

Rober said:
A couple of blocks down the road from us is a Spinone. It is NOT hunted and is just a house dog. It is not friendly around other dogs, to me it is to aggresive and I wont let my dogs near it. They dont think it is a problem, they think it is "funny". It is always barking and tearing stuff up in there yard. It may be an anomoly but it is not a nice dog at all.
Now that is a con!!!! I have no interest in dealing with this
 

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Re: 2014

At the risk of making a serious inquiry or comment and sending someone flying off the handle with ensued comment editing:

jayson2984 said:
Big Don: "Actually the slowness of their pace would be a serious con as far as I'm concerned."

That is not a con that is something they intially breed in to the dogs.
I'm in the same boat with Don regarding their pace. I see their speed as a con (assuming Don meant it as a con for bird hunting) for really any bird found in PA, barring a flight of woodcock that are thick as fleas or on a small preserve that most pointing breeds would make quick work of, run off of or unto a roadway. Even then out of those two scenarios, only the second makes their slow pace a positive which would hinge on if they can get the birds pinned before they reach the edge of the property.

Don, Did Craig come out with his setter book yet?
 

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Re: 2014

jayson2984 said:
Rober said:
A couple of blocks down the road from us is a Spinone. It is NOT hunted and is just a house dog. It is not friendly around other dogs, to me it is to aggresive and I wont let my dogs near it. They dont think it is a problem, they think it is "funny". It is always barking and tearing stuff up in there yard. It may be an anomoly but it is not a nice dog at all.
Now that is a con!!!! I have no interest in dealing with this
This is not to say that they are bad dogs as it is just my experience with them. I have said to most people that there are no bad dogs, just bad owners and that just could be the case here. When I walk past they always ask how come my dogs are so well behaved and I tell them that a "well exercised dog is a well behaved dog". They say, no really what is it, and I say no really exercise him and make him tired and he will be more obedient. They just dont get it. Do your research as all have said. Go and see the parents, go to a trial and see if a Spinone is really what you want. Reserach in a book is fine, but nothing beats "eyes on"
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Re: 2014

Deutsch-Drahthaar? Pros/cons


***curly hair is not a con***
 

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Re: 2014

Lyco Setter said:
At the risk of making a serious inquiry or comment and sending someone flying off the handle with ensued comment editing:

jayson2984 said:
Big Don: "Actually the slowness of their pace would be a serious con as far as I'm concerned."

That is not a con that is something they intially breed in to the dogs.
I'm in the same boat with Don regarding their pace. I see their speed as a con (assuming Don meant it as a con for bird hunting) for really any bird found in PA, barring a flight of woodcock that are thick as fleas or on a small preserve that most pointing breeds would make quick work of, run off of or unto a roadway. Even then out of those two scenarios, only the second makes their slow pace a positive which would hinge on if they can get the birds pinned before they reach the edge of the property.

Don, Did Craig come out with his setter book yet?

No. He said that the setter/pointer book wouldn't take nearly as long as the first book did, but I suspect it'll still be a year or two down the road. He does very careful, extensive, and expensive research. I'd love to know what he'll end up losing on the original book. It was definitely a labor of love!
 

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Re: 2014

I guess we'll simply have to determine our definition of "con"!
Personally,I don't give a darn if it's an inbred trait or not, if it's something that I don't like to see in a bird dog, it's a "con" to me, meaning I don't want a dog that exhibits that particular trait. Slowness and seeming lack of intensity happens to be very high on my list of undesirable traits, therefore it's a "con". I would avoid dogs that had that trait bred into them. Others might not.
 

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Re: 2014

jayson2984 said:
Deutsch-Drahthaar? Pros/cons


***curly hair is not a con***
I'm on my first DD, she's a year old, and I've been around a lot in the past year. I haven't found a con yet. Best family dog I've ever owned and a serious hunter of any game furred or feathered.
 
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