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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This marks the 2nd time I re-finished the stock on my Lyman Deerstalker. The first time was last year, when all I did was re-coat it.

But this time I did it right... took it down to the bare wood, burned it a little with the torch and coated it with Tru Oil.

Came out gorgeous...

Enjoy

Good luck to all in 2010!






















 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. I was after this look, but also slightly glossy. It looks incredible in person.

mauser, I don't have any before pics saved unfortunately, but it was dark and reddish like most deerstalkers. However, it was glossy since I finished it last year.

Now, it's a totally different look. And has grain I never knew existed.

Torching the wood is tricky. I learned on doing the deer plaques, wasn't really sure I wanted to chance doing it to a gunstock.

But I grew the grapes and did it.

I torched right after I fine sanded and steel wooled the stock.

It really brought the grain out.
 

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Nuge, is the recoil pad on the deer stalker glued on? I don't see any obvious screw holes where it may be screwed on. I have done some stocks in the past with tru-oil and steel wool between coats. Kind of want to do mine but wondered if you removed the recoil pad or just taped around it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys...

The recoil pad is removed by 2 screws.... however, there are 2 sponge type fillers in the holes. That's why it looks as if there isn't any holes.
 

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SpiritNugent said:
Thanks guys. I was after this look, but also slightly glossy. It looks incredible in person.

mauser, I don't have any before pics saved unfortunately, but it was dark and reddish like most deerstalkers. However, it was glossy since I finished it last year.

Now, it's a totally different look. And has grain I never knew existed.

Torching the wood is tricky. I learned on doing the deer plaques, wasn't really sure I wanted to chance doing it to a gunstock.

But I grew the grapes and did it.

I torched right after I fine sanded and steel wooled the stock.

It really brought the grain out.
would like a few more details on how you did it ?
the flame from the tourch /
what distance?
what are you looking for when running the flame over the stock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lonewolf...

I would be happy to share the details. However, you must try and practice on a scrap piece of wood before doing a gunstock. It is very tricky with certain types of wood.

Pine, cedar, etc. are very easy, and come out very nice. Walnut is very tough, you have to be careful.

What you want to do is get yourself a handheld propane torch. You want the flame to be about 4-6" away from the wood to start... you will see if you need to get closer or farthur away as you go along.

Go with the wood grain... and keep the torch on the wood consistently. As in trying to torch the same area of sood for the same amount of time as the other areas.

With this stock, I ran the torch from bottom to top, and went up, came back down, went up, came back down. I kept doing this until the wood started to darken, and the grain started sticking out.

You want to bring the grain out, but not burn it black. The oil, gunstock finish, etc. will magnify the burning and will also magnify the pretty woodgrain you brought out.

You just have to be careful. I went over my stock about 50 times up and down. No joke. But I decided I was doing this stock right this time, and didn't care how long it took.

I purposelt burnt the area near the lock on the left side for character... thought it would be neat to have that area "burned" on a flinter.

Be very consistent with your up and down strokes with the torch along the wood grain, and always follow the wood grain. Never burn in other directions.

I kept the flame on the torch rather large, and hot. With walnut, it will take much longer to torch than your lighter woods and pines, cedars, etc.

You want to run that flame with the grain to bring it out, otherwise you'll get burn marks and the stock will look charcoaled.

This stock looked brown when I got done, but I knew the Tru Oil would bring the color out in it, and make it look good when it soaked into the wood.

Practice on a piece of wood before you do a gunstock though for sure.

Good luck and if I could be any more help, just let me know. I burn all my deer antler plaques like this as well. Always wanted to do a flintlock, finally did.
 
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