The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A lot of the area we hunt is in or around a park. We have to be careful,once it gets dark,driving around to the store or where ever. They wonder around like cows. But,come daylight they are gone.Go for a half a mile in the same area and never see one deer in the woods. Never kick one up. I think that they are so use to people they just lay there and let you wonder past them ? We had at lest 4 nice bucks let the walkers go past them and then get up and run behind them !These were close enough to the guys to scare them when they busted out ! They were bedded in little dents in the woods or small bush patches. It wood not happened if we would have had a little snow. With the antler thing we don't take jump shots any more.
What do you think ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,505 Posts
I think they have always been that way. Once they start feeling a little pressure they become a lot like a rabbit. They usually hang tight until the last second and then when finally jumped....they head for the back door. I have been seeing this behavior since the mid 80's. It's just what they do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
steelhead125 said:
I think they have always been that way. Once they start feeling a little pressure they become a lot like a rabbit. They usually hang tight until the last second and then when finally jumped....they head for the back door. I have been seeing this behavior since the mid 80's. It's just what they do.
This^^^^

It's also worth noting that a pressured big buck will more often than not lay still and not even get up unless you're about to step on him. That little 8x8' chunk of golden rod you can 'see right through' should be be walked right through! More than once I've put deer out of tiny bits of cover I can see right through! That lone little patch of laurel....same thing. That blown down tree-top...you get the idea. It's amazing how well they blend in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
Deer have been adjusting to people since before we all were born. Its the old story where the deer are before the hunt and where they are on opening day.
Its as important to know where the hunters are as where the deer are.

I once was sitting in a patch of woods between apartments on one side and houses on the other. Three deer were moving through the wooded area. They knew the area was safe even though a maintenance worker at the apartment complex, was using a noisy leaf blower, less than 50 yards away.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,820 Posts
Where I hunt, there are a couple homes in the general area. At one home, the occupant has a routine that involves some fairly noisy activities out of doors, twice per day. Once in the morning, and once in the evening. I won't go into detail, but suffice it to say, if you came along to hunt with me and heard this racket, you'd think, "well, that's that, our hunt's over."

The deer who live in the area who hear this commotion start up will pop up their heads to listen, and once they are sure of what it is, will just go about whatever they were doing when the ruckus began.

In rifle season, when we get "imports" from surrounding areas, those deer light the afterburners when the racket begins, but the "residents" just keep on about their business. It's pretty comical to watch, actually.

But....drop a pin in a manner that isn't consistent with the racket they hear day in and day out, and I've seen them hit top speed instantly.

They know us at least as well as we know them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,254 Posts
tdd said:
They know us at least as well as we know them.
I agree with that. I always thought it would be interesting during a fall hunting season to have all the hunters and all the deer in an area radio collared. Then on like a google earth view from above watch how they interacted with each other during hunting times. Would probably make us sick to know how many deer we have walked right past.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,314 Posts
cspot said:
tdd said:
They know us at least as well as we know them.
I agree with that. I always thought it would be interesting during a fall hunting season to have all the hunters and all the deer in an area radio collared. Then on like a google earth view from above watch how they interacted with each other during hunting times. Would probably make us sick to know how many deer we have walked right past.
I'd rather not know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,518 Posts
All you need is a good vantage point high enough to glass lots of territory and some good binocs, to do that. Been doing it for over 30 years where my camp is.

Any year my bud and I got our bucks early, we'd spend the rest of the first week driving around and watching others hunt, while also spotting deer lurking here and there.

It is pretty educational and there are lots of hilltops crossed by gravel roads, to watch many hundreds of acres from. Some woods, some open fields. Even easier with snow on.

As for deer becoming used to people and dogs, have observed that here at home for a long time. When the deer come out of the woods behind our house and head for our apples, some don't mind a noisy lab on a line, or even me.

This year there was one big doe that will come up within a few feet of me if I'm chuckin' apples to them, while the rest run out into the field to wait.

I've never tried to hand feed her an apple, but as brassy as she is, might be able to?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top