The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In the recent issue of Outdoor News there was an article about the decline of the songbird population of nearly 30 percent in the last 50 years. It was mentioned that global warming and habitat loss are probable causes.

This was brought up on the Feral Cat thread when two posters mentioned that the decline is much steeper and larger. One was me and it has been noticed and commented on by me and my neighbors. The other poster had the same experience to report.

In my case, I would estimate the drop is more like 60-70 percent in the last 2-3 years. The suggestion was made that a drop this big and quick could be caused by a disease.

I started this thread to determine how widespread this type of decline in population is and is the cause a disease or something else. Global warming and habitat change would not work this quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,178 Posts
the decline is bad. there is another thread about this & I noted how I have gone from filling the feeder

2 or 3 times a week to once a week. :surprise2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,777 Posts
Due to drawing bears, I don't start up the bird feeders until rifle deer season is over. I end it about mid February for the same reason. In past years the traffic has been heavy. I'm not doubting other peoples experiences. Maybe the practice of feeding birds itself has led to a decline? Wouldn't that be something!

Whenever global warming is mentioned, I become suspect of any new crisis. I agree that a disease is more likely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,211 Posts
A while ago I posted a similar item but not sure if it was on this site. Since then I still have not seen a lot of birds. Sure some, but not many at all.
I am not a sky-is-falling person but this bothers me as they are important parts of our ecosystem. Maybe it's a cycle?

Also noticed that the dozen or so squirrels I had in the yard at the feeder have been reduced to 1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/neonicotinoids-birds-seeds-1.5281002

In this Canadian study they fed about a dozen birds with each of two different low doses of nicotinoids laced oil, and gave untreated oil to another dozen for comparison. They observed the birds for about six hours, then released them with tiny tags on their backs. The tags send a signal as the birds fly past receiving towers dotted across the region.

The wild birds also experienced loss of appetite and weight loss, and tended to spend an average of 3.5 days recovering before continuing their migration.The good news was that once they did, they had no trouble going in the right direction, even though lab studies suggested that neonics affect birds' ability to orient themselves.

The researchers think wild birds just don't fly until that effect wears off.

They noted that hunkering down to recover could leave the birds more vulnerable to predators or extreme weather. And the delay itself could have more serious negative impacts.

neonicotinoids, (nicotine) are used in growing sunflowers and millet at planting. It remains in the seed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
I ran into a couple ANF employees at CCSF and they were studying tweety birds. They were catching and banding them. They told me that there is a Japanese fruit fly and the females were laying her eggs in berries and that is effecting the fruit eating birds. But I don't think that explains what happened at my bird feeder. Could be wrong.

Curley, I have a sunflower bird feeder that I hang well out of reach of bears (I have a trail cam on my deck and get pictures of bears trying to reach it with no avail), SOL bears. The suet which attracts woodpeckers and nuthatches, I bring in every night.

I feed birds a foot off one of my windows (so I get a close up view) all year long and they came to the feeder from day light to dark, I even get flying squirrels at night. This year most birds completely disappeared. I still get cardinals at dawn and dusk along with a few nuthatches during the day at the sunflower feeder. The many, many chickadees, titmouse and finches that frequented the sunflower feeder, disappeared all at once. I used to feed them a 2 gallon jug of sunflower everyday. This has happened to others I have talked with too. I'm puzzled and as rocky said I leaning to disease. Buy the way, I clean my feeders once a week every week. I don't think it is bad feed as the cardinals and nuthatches eat it. I'm puzzled...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
In the recent issue of Outdoor News there was an article about the decline of the songbird population of nearly 30 percent in the last 50 years. It was mentioned that global warming and habitat loss are probable causes.

This was brought up on the Feral Cat thread when two posters mentioned that the decline is much steeper and larger. One was me and it has been noticed and commented on by me and my neighbors. The other poster had the same experience to report.

In my case, I would estimate the drop is more like 60-70 percent in the last 2-3 years. The suggestion was made that a drop this big and quick could be caused by a disease.

I started this thread to determine how widespread this type of decline in population is and is the cause a disease or something else. Global warming and habitat change would not work this quick.
Yeah because there is NO global warming crap!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
There is concern that neonicotinoid pesticides might harm to bees and song birds.

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?...and+birds&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart

This. Pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers. We are just now beginning to see what decades of using these poisons will do. Global warming is a joke. Climate change has always been going on but it is not caused by man. BUT spraying poisons all over the ground, our water and our wildlife is and always was a bad idea. Put your roundup away boys and use natural methods and fertilizers.


I haven't filled my feeders in over a week. Birds are just not around. Not good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,921 Posts
Most likely the same thing that is harming humans is harming birds. All of the chemicals we are exposed to and/or ingest both purposely and unpurposely takes it toll over time. The advantage humans have is modern medicine to combat the effects, which is weakening us as a species as well over time. The human species is getting weaker instead of stronger over time, which is the opposite of how nature intends. Not good for us either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Neonicinide has been around a long time and this problem hit fast and hard and from what see i nearly all birds are affected. It seems like a bubonic plague for birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
Most likely the same thing that is harming humans is harming birds. All of the chemicals we are exposed to and/or ingest both purposely and unporposely takes it toll over time. The advantage humans have is modern medicine to combat the effects, which is weakening us as a species as well over time. The human species is getting weaker instead of stronger over time, which is the opposite of how nature intends. Not good for us either.

Yup, I agree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,698 Posts
Member of our camp is a birder so I ask him if he was seeing any decline in small birds and if so what's the cause.
Here's his response.

I’m not aware of any declines with regard to “feeder birds”. Gold/house Finches, cardinals, jays, house sparrows and chipping sparrows seem to have boom and bust years...also feeder birds often leave feeders in the warmer weather and a casual observer thinks the birds have died off. Conjunctivitis can wipe out local populations. House finches and cardinals are especially prone to it.
If you feed hummingbirds keep your feeders up. This is the time western species show up.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
Member of our camp is a birder so I ask him if he was seeing any decline in small birds and if so what's the cause.
Here's his response.

I’m not aware of any declines with regard to “feeder birds”. Gold/house Finches, cardinals, jays, house sparrows and chipping sparrows seem to have boom and bust years...also feeder birds often leave feeders in the warmer weather and a casual observer thinks the birds have died off. Conjunctivitis can wipe out local populations. House finches and cardinals are especially prone to it.
If you feed hummingbirds keep your feeders up. This is the time western species show up.
I don't know where he is but my Gold finch population at my feeder and our cone flowers has gone from 8 to 10 at a time to 2 or 3 and my mocking bird population has disappeared. Something is going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,698 Posts
This guy lives near Williamsport, could be different in his backyard.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
This guy lives near Williamsport, could be different in his backyard.
Yeah, that is the problem, this is a big state and things are not the same all over. It does not necessarily show a sate wide problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,178 Posts
I dont know what is going on but the bird feeder attendance is almost zero so far this week.......:surprise2: :sad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,756 Posts
Ask most people who have bird feeders, what the problem is, its the small hawks. Their numbers are up since they were protected about fifty years ago. Yes raptor numbers are up, they do not seem to be bothered by climate change or the poor habitat. Everything they prey on has dropped in numbers while their numbers rose. Don't have to be too smart to come to the conclusion that maybe an increase in the predators that eat birds could be responsible for the decline. Strange, that we hear that we should hunt and trap predators like coyote and the furred predators to reduce predation, but yet if the predator has feathers, they are not seen as able to reduce prey numbers. All predators should be controlled based on numbers, not emotions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Even the hawks have disappeared at my place another weird thing- red headed buzzards have been replaced by black headed ones there were 8 lined up on a fence yesterday
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top