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07/12/2017
CWD FOUND IN THE WILD IN CLEARFIELD COUNTY
HARRISBURG, PA - Chronic wasting disease has spread to free-ranging deer in an area of the state where it previously had been detected only in captive deer.
The Pennsylvania Game Commission today announced a free-ranging whitetail buck in Bell Township, Clearfield County, has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD).
A news conference about the new CWD-positive deer and the Game Commission’s response will be held on Thursday, July 13, at noon at the Game Commission’s Harrisburg headquarters. The news conference will be available to view on the Game Commission’s social media pages.
The CWD-positive buck was shot by a wildlife conservation officer June 7 on State Game Lands 87 because it showed signs of being diseased. Preliminary tests indicated the buck was CWD-positive, and the final results confirm the buck was infected with CWD, which always is fatal to deer and elk.
The buck was within Disease Management Area 3 (DMA 3), which was established in 2014 after surveillance by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture detected CWD at two captive deer facilities in Jefferson County.
Because this buck was located near the center of the 350-square-mile DMA 3, the DMA will not need to expand.
However, the Game Commission is immediately taking steps to increase CWD surveillance within DMA 3.
The Game Commission will be allocating Deer Management Assistance Program permits within DMA 3. Each hunter can purchase up to two of the 2,800 DMAP permits anywhere hunting licenses are sold by requesting permits for Unit 3045.
The permits will become available very soon, likely by July 13.
These DMAP permits can be used to take antlerless deer on public and private lands within DMA 3 during any established deer season. Hunters must acquire permission from private landowners prior to hunting.
Harvest data from DMAP permits will augment CWD surveillance.
All known road-killed deer within DMA 3, and a portion of the deer harvested by hunters, already are tested each year for the disease. The Game Commission is looking to increase this sampling effort and obtain more-precise harvest-location information. Cooperation from hunters will be an important first step to make this happen.
The Game Commission also plans to use sharpshooters in DMA 3, in a small, focal area where the CWD-positive deer was found, in hopes of stopping the disease before it has a chance to grow and spread.
In Pennsylvania, CWD has been an increasing threat. The disease also exists among wild deer in the area of southcentral Pennsylvania defined as Disease Management Area 2. Twenty-five free-ranging deer tested positive for CWD during 2016. And an additional four CWD-positive deer have been detected since, raising to 51 the total of CWD-positives detected within the DMA 2 since 2012.
While the spread of CWD within Pennsylvania is a concern statewide and a threat to the state’s deer and its deer-hunting tradition, this latest CWD-positive within DMA 3 is a concern also because of its proximity to Pennsylvania’s elk range, which abuts DMA 3. More than 100 elk are tested for CWD each year and, thus far, the disease has not been detected among the state’s elk.
“There is no vaccine to prevent deer or elk from contracting CWD, and there’s no treatment to cure infected animals,” said Game Commission wildlife-management director Wayne Laroche. “However, if we can remove the infected animals from this area so they are no longer coming in contact with healthy deer or shedding the prion that causes the disease, we may be able to slow its spread and minimize its effects on deer and elk, and the people who enjoy them.
“It’s important our response is as effective and efficient as possible to attempt to curtail this disease before it becomes well-established in an area where it not only is a threat to our deer, but also our elk,” Laroche said.
While CWD poses a serious threat to Pennsylvania’s deer and elk, there is no strong evidence it can be transmitted to humans. As a precaution, however, hunters are advised not to eat the meat from animals known to be infected with CWD, or believed to be diseased.
There already is a prohibition on removing the high-risk parts of harvested deer from any DMA. Hunters who harvest deer and take it to a meat processor or taxidermist within a DMA are making certain that deer are available to the Game Commission for CWD surveillance.
Laroche said cooperating deer hunters within DMA 3 will play a key role in the CWD surveillance to take place there. If the harvest locations of sampled deer are known, it will be possible to more precisely target management actions, he said.
It doesn’t cost anything to drop deer heads off for sampling, and if a sample tests positive, the hunter will be notified.
Game Commission Executive Director Bryan Burhans said it’s important to respond quickly and directly to the serious threat CWD represents. Response measures in areas where CWD is known to be present improve the chances of limiting the disease to a few areas as opposed to many, he said.
“For the sake of our deer and elk, and their importance to hunters and nonhunters alike, we must do all we can to control this threat in the Commonwealth,” Burhans said.

News conference
The Pennsylvania Game Commission is hosting a news conference about chronic wasting disease, and the response planned to address the newly detected CWD-positive deer in Clearfield County.
The news conference will be held at noon on Thursday, July 13 at the Game Commission’s Harrisburg headquarters, 2001 Elmerton Ave. in Harrisburg, just off the Progress Avenue exit of Interstate 81.
Those unable to attend can watch the news conference in real time on Facebook Live.
Staff from the Game Commission, state Department of Agriculture, state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Keystone Elk Country Alliance and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation are among those scheduled to be available at the news conference.
 

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As I have been saying for awhile now, CWD has long been established throughout Pennsylvania. No surprise that a new case has turned up in free range.

There will be no containment plan that works. All of the current "solutions" have proven to not do much, yet the PGC continues to forge ahead with failing plans.
 

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As I have been saying for awhile now, CWD has long been established throughout Pennsylvania. No surprise that a new case has turned up in free range.

There will be no containment plan that works. All of the current "solutions" have proven to not do much, yet the PGC continues to forge ahead with failing plans.
And what do you think they should do?

You are also very much wrong about it being established throughout the state. There is little doubt it is going to eventually spread across most and perhaps even eventually all of the state but the people who have studied the subject know it can be slowed greatly by following the action plan in place by the Game Commission.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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my guess is they will eliminate as many deer as possible to stop this from getting to the elk. Herd Eradication instead of Herd Reduction. draw a circle on the map and any deer found inside that circle is gone.
 

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I will tell you bluntly that the pgc and other agencies are not doing there job with cwd. The only reason it is in this state and spreading is from deer farms and transporting those deer. Every captive deer should have been killed years ago and anyone moving one over the border should be locked up and fined to the max. Every day they wait is to long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will tell you bluntly that the pgc and other agencies are not doing there job with cwd. The only reason it is in this state and spreading is from deer farms and transporting those deer. Every captive deer should have been killed years ago and anyone moving one over the border should be locked up and fined to the max. Every day they wait is to long.
Once again you can thank your legislators for taking control of deer farms from the PGC and giving it to the Agriculture Dept.
 

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And what do you think they should do?
I have stated many times what should be done. And I stated them directly to you.

You are also very much wrong about it being established throughout the state.
Actually, I am correct. If you would go back and read my first posts on this subject many years ago when this discussion began, I predicted exactly what has happened.

There is little doubt it is going to eventually spread across most and perhaps even eventually all of the state but the people who have studied the subject know it can be slowed greatly by following the action plan in place by the Game Commission.

Dick Bodenhorn
That is an assumption. No one knows if the current plans have "slowed" the spread. What we do know is that CWD continues to spread despite all of these plans that have been tried over and over in the past.

We have a good template in this country. CWD has been long established for many many years in many areas in western states. They remain destination states for hunters and have strong game populations. They have CWD precautions and regulations in place. Killing off the cervids or attempting to drastically reduce their numbers is not the way forward.
 

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my guess is they will eliminate as many deer as possible to stop this from getting to the elk. Herd Eradication instead of Herd Reduction. draw a circle on the map and any deer found inside that circle is gone.
Which has not worked in the past.
 

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google "CWD Prions" there is all the info you need to know. once it is established its here to stay. cooking temperatures CAN NOT kill the CWD prions. so far as they know CWD is not transferable to humans but once it mutates and i believe it eventually will, THERE IS NO CURE, IT IS FATAL.

just like the cattle version of CWD. it became transferable to humans and has killed people. it doesnt matter where it is. right now it is not in the meat. when you get your deer processed take it to a processor that de-bones the meat and does not use a table saw or do your own. avoid spinal fluids and bone marrow.

do a google search for better information.

ALSO: take a look at how Wisconsin tried to manage the spread of CWD years ago. almost eradicated their entire deer herd....didnt work.
 

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ALSO: take a look at how Wisconsin tried to manage the spread of CWD years ago. almost eradicated their entire deer herd....didnt work.
Yep. Doesn't work or prevent the spread of the disease. It is here, and will be here for a long time. Precautions, education, and strong regulation of game farms are the ways forward.
 

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Yep. Doesn't work or prevent the spread of the disease. It is here, and will be here for a long time. Precautions, education, and strong regulation of game farms are the ways forward.
The reasons they couldn’t contain it or perhaps even slow CWD from spreading in Wisconsin was due to several factors.

Factor number one was they didn’t detect it until it was already wide spread throughout their captive heads and even had a good start in their wild populations.

The second factor was that as soon as the deer propagators learned their herds were going to killed a high percentage of their deer disappeared, many by being released into the wild while others were quickly moved to other states including this one.

Then yet other factor that prevented them from getting a better handle on it was that just like in this state, hunters who thought they knew a lot more than they did, fought them to prevent them from killing their deer herds in large numbers even within the core CWD areas. They even got the politicians involved to stop them from reducing the deer herds.

I am sure there were other factors but those are most likely the major ones.

Chronic Wasting Disease on the Rise in Wisconsin Deer; Will it Infect Humans? | PR Watch

CWD news you won't hear from state

Meanwhile Illinois, which undoubtedly had CWD spread into their state from Wisconsin, has had a much more aggressive CWD approach with sharpshooters within CWD areas has had a much better success rate at containing CWD within the northern portion of their state. See the maps at the end of the following article.

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/programs/CWD/Documents/CWDAnnualReport20152016.pdf

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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Virgina and West Virginia have dealt with CWD for years...They have their containment areas but the disease is not spreading and they are not killing off all the deer in those areas... They have no dumpsters out...Killing off all the deer does not work...
 

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I'm pretty familiar with this area.Where or how do they think it contracted CWD?The two captive deer found to have CWD were pretty far from where this one was found.Not to start a rumor but there is an interesting twist to this.A couple years ago,a customer of mine was telling me about a big 10 point he killed near an Amish farm that raised deer.When he took the buck to get mounted,the taxidermist claimed it was a captive deer at one point because it still had the hole in it's ear from the tag.later that year,the guy runs into the Amish farmer and the Amish guy gave him a rash of crap about him shooting one of the bucks he let go that year.He claimed to have been stocking big bucks in the area.I know this guy very well and no way was he feeding me a line of crap.As the crow flies,This isn't all that far from SGL 87.Yes I did call two different WCO's about it when it happened.
 

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No cure, no way to stop it, and since it was first found, all it has done is spread. And yes the prions are in the meat also, not just the parts that are restricted. Trim fat, debone, don't eat brain, but it is also in the musle tissue. Any thought of useful prevention was not used in the past. And for the deer in Wisconsin, the wolves in the northern part of the state have really reduced deer numbers.
 

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My comments will be very simple by saying this isnt good, We as hunters need to stand together to get our representatives in harrisburg on board. They are the ones that are going to stop it, not sitting behind a keyboard of phone typing on a forum. I think the soulution is containment, Keep in conatined to the areas were it is already at, There are people working in the federal goverment for a cure, and there is alot of belief that there will be one, one day. This isnt just a deer issue, this cold very easily jump from deer, to cattle, to sheep or any other kind of farm animal and humans. We as hunters need to help push the deparment of Ag to get a grip on the moving a deer and deer farms, the pa game commision has its hands tied unless there are escaped deer then they are fair game. I hope since its next to the elk range that it doesnt cross over to them, it would be detrimental to a already small(ish) elk herd.

For everyone that wants to listen to more on the topic listen to the meat eater podcast about cwd, Very much woth the 2 hour listen and very informative.
 

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We as sportsman do not have a choice except what the PGC say and try give in. Remember us sportsman are in control of this also. I take every step possible to work with the program being in the middle of the DMA. At least the PGC has dumpsters, please use them and they have been grades for road kills also. I would sooner put the parts in it then scatter out on my property. They are making an attempt and have recognized there is a problem. So lets do a little give and take and see if it can get better. The only thing I disagree on is the DMA-2 tags. I agree the dma was little big and this year they made different zones with in the dma not a bad thing. However to take the dma tag from 6.70 and making it a dmap tag I don't care for. Me as a NR that dmap is like 35 or 36.00 why would anyone want to spend an extra 10.00 especially as a management tool the PGC is asking for help. I don't know what a resident dmap tag is but I know its higher then regular unit tag.
 

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Here's an interesting article from Wisconsin:

Can chronic wasting disease jump to humans? Concerns keep rising


I'm with dpms it's here so we'll have to deal with it but Larouch should stop hitting the panic button trying to scare the bejesus out of everyone.

The heck with spending money on sharpshooters.

If the PGC really wants to thin the herd get the tags out to the hunters.

I'm sure a lot of hunters would jump at the chance to bag extra deer.

And as time goes on Mother Nature will make the final decision on CWD.
 

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it started in captive deer many people say from deer eating there own dna in minerals made from deer sent to rendering plants i don't know if that is true but some states have rules saying a deer farm must have a fence 8ft outside the inside fence to keep the wilddeer from contacted the penned deer but it is to late in pa as it is to late to shut the door now to much money invalde
 

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No cure, no way to stop it, and since it was first found, all it has done is spread. And yes the prions are in the meat also, not just the parts that are restricted. Trim fat, debone, don't eat brain, but it is also in the musle tissue. Any thought of useful prevention was not used in the past. And for the deer I Wisconsin, the wolves in the northern part of the state have really reduced deer numbers.

do you have a link or any real info on the prions being in the meat ?
 
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